Yesterday Salesforce completed its acquisition of RelateIQ, a startup that combines CRM and data science to get the right messages to the right person at the right time. The sales price was $392,133,512 -- not bad for a company that was founded three years ago.

While much was reported when the sale was first announced, little has been said as to what happens next, other than Salesforce gaining improved big data, data science and analytic capabilities.

Yesterday VentureBeat wrote, without identifying its source, that Salesforce would create an R&D division, Salesforce X, where RelateIQ’s data scientists would work.

Not a bad idea considering that RelateIQ’s Chief Technology officer, DJ Patil, was named one of the 7 most powerful data scientists in the world by Forbes magazine, and is credited (along with Jeff Hammerbacher) to have coined the term “data scientist”.

Patil’s team members aren’t slackers either. Rusian Belkin, Twitter’s former VP Engineering, Search and Content, leads Engineering at RealateIQ. And then there’s Daniel Francisco, Relate IQ’s Manager of Product, he was Chief of Staff and Product Manager at Linkedin.

Even if the Salesforce X rumor is wrong, it’s a good idea. So how about it, Mr. Benioff? You have one of the best data teams in the world working for you and chances are good that they’re more into doing interesting work than money. The latter of which they probably have plenty of because all of the successful startups they’ve worked at.

Splunk Changes IT with its App for Stream and the Cloud

Many of us see big data insights and analytics as tools that can be used to figure out which ads should be posted on the websites we visit, to help us discover new LinkedIn connections, Facebook friends and so on.

But some of the biggest uses of big data and analytics aren’t consumer facing at all. Instead they monitor computer hardware, network performance and to discover hacker attacks.

Splunk is one of the leaders in helping the Enterprise and smaller businesses to get this kind of work done. After all, companies are becoming increasingly network dependent and if there’s a major network failure or hacker attack, you’re out of business.