A group of researchers at Altimeter Group have identified four business disruption trends, and how future digital economies will be built, in part, by the me-cosystem. It's the world of data and technology that could deliver more useful, relevant and engaging experiences to individuals.

30 Disruptive Technologies

Altimeter is working on an open research project, and it's come up with about 30 disruptive technologies that are now, or soon will be, having a disruptive impact on business. It includes things like haptic surfaces, 3-D printing, bio-engineering and even human piloted drones.

Additionally, Altimeter has identified 15 trends that it recommends business leaders pay close attention to. This list includes popular buzz words like big data, Internet of things, and quantified self (human API). Altimeter is looking for feedback on its list, and it will be releasing a series of reports that go into more depth on the four main disruption themes for business.

For now, the introductory report is available as a sort of primer on the topic, and any insights Altimeter can gain from the public could be included in the follow up reports, the company noted in a blog post last week.

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How should dynamic businesses respond to the me-cosystem?

Digital Economies + the Me-cosystem

The rapid rise of digital technology forms the backdrop of Altimeter's thinking in this report, and it includes the Internet of things (the world of connected devices) but also subjects like wireless power. The ability for us to nearly immerse ourselves in technology -- think wearable devices like Google Glass -- will allow for a more contextualized virtual experience, the report found.

Based partly on this, a new digital economy will likely wreck havoc on traditional supply chains as buyers, sellers and marketplaces more directly interact. The resulting shift in expectations of those groups will force dynamic companies to create and nurture a culture and infrastructure that allows for flexibility; what Altimeter calls an ad-hocracy.

Tell us in the comments if you think a new digital economy is upon us or if you think it is still at least another five years away.