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No matter how many acronyms get thrown around, a few truths lie at the center of the digital experience: 1. it's complicated, 2. it's about to get more complicated and 3. if you're basing it on anything other than a customer-centric focus, it's back to the drawing board for you. 

During the future of digital experience Tweet Jam the participants debated the finer points of rip and replace approaches vs. incremental integration, the need (or lack therein) for standards and in general tested the boundaries of the 140 character limit. Read on for some highlights.

Where Web Content Management Fits

Backbone, critical, foundational, heavy lifter -- the panel was (mostly) in agreement about the important role that web content management plays in the digital marketing toolbox, but you'd be wrong if you thought it was all that's required. Analytics, e-commerce, CRM, marketing automation all play parts in creating today's digital experiences. 

(Editor's Note: In the interest of following some of the conversations that took place during the chat, some Tweets were moved out of chronological order.)

Out With the Old, In With the New?

Breaking up is hard to do.

The participants debated the finer points of legacy platforms vs. a clean sweep in technology. For most, it will come down to integration. A course of incremental integration -- rather than a full-scale rip and replace -- across data, tools, people and processes will be the path forward.

Chicken vs. Egg Question

Choosing between agility and functionality was a bit of a Sophie's Choice for most, but the panel agreed that acronyms and adjectives don't mean much if your business doesn't keep the customer's needs at the center of any digital experience planning. 

Who Needs Standards?

When asked what, if any, standards are needed in the digital experience space the general response was "Nice in theory, not so easy in practice."

Is the digital experience space too large to create across the board standards? Or will standards emerge naturally as the space itself evolves?  

Disruptive Forces

Wearables, Internet of Everything, Mobility, Big (or Smart) Data -- the usual suspects cropped up in the list of disruptive forces. Businesses already feel pressure from some (if not all) of these forces, but what can they do to get up to speed when some still struggle with handling a customer interaction that moves from laptop to smartphone?

Do You Believe in Magic?

We returned to web content management for the final question. WCM platforms do the heavy lifting for multiple business areas, not just marketing. Have they evolved to meet the needs of all stakeholders? Will businesses ever make full use of all the functionality they offer? 

The answers weren't clear, but the argument can still be made for the marketing department to work closely with IT to work out the solution best for the business's needs.

Title image by Creative Commons Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 2.0 Generic License  h.koppdelaney