Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for official-twitter-bird-white-on-blue.png The animosity between companies seems to be affecting the flow and interoperabilty between apps. So, its been some time coming for Microsoft's new SkyDrive app, while Twitter tries to replace some of the features it lost when the social apps started falling out with each other.

Microsoft and Apple Playing Nice?

It is actually hard to tell on this one. If you believe the gossip, Apple were apparently refusing to release the app until Microsoft made upgrading storage an in-app purchase (giving Apple a cut of the proceeds). The new app, rolling along to version 3.0, brings a lot of improvements and features, but there's no sign of an upgrade option within the app. So perhaps Microsoft, just took that ball off the field and went home with it. 

What we do get is a more Windows 8 look to the app with Microsoft's clean, flat, look. There's support for the iPhone 5 and optimizations for users running an iPad mini, using their greater/diminished screen space. On the practical side you can now download full resolution photos and choose what resolution to upload images at (presumably for those on tight mobile deals). 

SkyDrive finally gets upgraded for iOS users

Other improvements include better interaction with other iOS apps, plus the usual raft of bug fixes and performance improvements. Until we get Office for iOS, there's no extra features for Word or other Office files, but that might have to wait until an official iPhone Office app. 

Twitter's App Doing More

Having just announced a host of updates to the service, the iOS v5.5 app is now live, which makes use of the much-touted Cards feature to make accessing other apps and content easier. This allows users to download an app they don't have or open and access a feature within an app that they do. That could help repair the damage done in the Facebook (via Instagram) and Twitter fallout that broke a major benefit of Twitter app interoperability. 

What that probably means is a load of Twitter adverts trying to sucker people into downloading apps to get to content, but if you choose who you follow on the service wisely, we'd hope that doesn't become too much of a problem. 


Other improvements include faster launch times and general performance upgrades, plus you can look into the "Retweeted by" option in the details menu, and a number of minor bug fixes. There's no huge changes to the user interface, although the top of the Discover menu now seems a bit more interesting.

As a user, I don't care who was "right" or "wrong" in these situations, I just want the best apps with full functionality. If the major players can't sort their stuff out, perhaps its time to look to new apps that don't have so many axes to grind.