Oracle_logo_2010.jpg It was announced nearly two months ago, but the ink has finally dried on the contract. Vitrue has been swallowed by Oracle as it continues to build and peruse social media capabilities that will tie into its customer experience management strategy.

Oracle, Vitrue

Terms of the deal have not been released -- much like the recent Involver acquisition -- and not a lot has changed since the deal was first announced in May, certainly not for Oracle.

For Vitrue it’s been a little bit different; no sooner had it announced that Oracle agreed to buy it out, than Oracle started stamping its print all over the website and brand name.

Not that there is a problem with that. After all it’s an Oracle company now and Oracle is perfectly entitled to stamp its mark everywhere. What Oracle hasn’t really done is explain what exactly it is going to do with Vitrue.

But it’s probably not too hard to guess as social media appears to be one of the spaces where Oracle is prepared to spend freely.

In the original statement about the acquisition, Oracle said that it would be using Vitrue to take Oracle’s social engagement strategy to a new level by giving brands the ability to scale across social networks, push marketing messages from global to local, and create unique brand experiences across networks.

Which is all very nice, and fits in well with the recent Involver acquisition and the Collective Intellect too:

Together, Oracle and Vitrue plan to enable a unified social experience across customer interactions, resulting in meaningful customer engagements with consistent brand experiences across all channels and media, “ the statement adds.

Oracle’s Social, CXM

And so continues Oracle’s social media strategy, which feeds into a much more significant strategy -- for Oracle, that is -- of developing its customer experience management functionality.

Earlier this week, in the Forrester Wave for CRM Q3 2012, we saw that this was beginning to pay off handsomely for Oracle and is likely to continue to do so in the coming years with four of its customer experience products in the Wave and two in the Leaders segment of the Wave.

If Oracle is feeling that its social strategy in this context is a bit tired, then it is only in relation to Salesforce's strong social abilities in the cloud. In that respect, it’s still trailing.

There is another problem that Forrester identified in the Oracle strategy that suggested customers are beginning to show signs of confusion about the Oracle portfolio, some expressing concern about the level of investment in acquired technologies as Oracle keeps expanding.

This will undoubtedly be one of the major challenges facing Oracle in this space in the coming months, so let’s wait it out and see where it goes.