Personalizing Customer Experience with Big DataBack in 1991, I trained in a database marketing boot camp. I worked on American Express (AMEX), managing it’s Gold Card direct marketing efforts. AmEx, a leader in personalizing printed communications, had created its most successful program when it highlighted in direct mail pieces that someone was a “Member since XXXX.” Yes, membership had its privileges. But for American Express, this personalization triggered a lift.

Show Me What You Got

Now it’s over 20 years later. And while 2013 was the year of big data in the back office where companies tried to set up the proper infrastructure and human resources to be part of this phenomenon, 2014 will be the year to personalize big data on the screen.

The term personalization has many meanings to many people. For the purposes of this post, I am focusing on "the content on the screen." Customizing what the user reads and sees will be the challenge, especially because a responsive design approach still requires careful consideration about what is personalized on a tablet versus an iPhone.

Big Data Will be Operationalized

With personalization being a key theme in 2014, marketers will need to get their hands dirty and truly understand the different categories in their customer database. They need to design their digital platforms with their database in mind, knowing that different areas of the screen can pull in content from both the customer and product database.

For example, Amazon pulls in two different types of data based on my purchase behavior: books on digital marketing, which I am interested in, and children’s videos, which I access every night via their Instant Video. Their customer database might carry just the title name, the author and the price. The assets for that information would be in a product database. The two need to work closely together on the screen.

Every day, Netflix and Amazon demonstrate their ability to leverage this kind of data to talk to their customers on an individual and personal level. Sometimes, I think they could go a step further in personalizing information on the page, especially because one of the big battle grounds in 2014 will be same day delivery. Amazon and Walmart can incorporate GPS data to determine potential offline purchases or product drop off points.