This week, social media was drowned out by the likes of Chromecast and Hootsuite's Vidyard app, but have no fear, there were some other news that caught our attention. 

A Fake Tweet Here, A Fake Tweet There

It was a week for fake Tweets, apparently. Not only did Chipotle fake its own hacking to celebrate its anniversary, Twitter also put out some rogue tweets on purpose. In the company's blog post where they announced an integration of Twitter and television, is a shot of a new Twitter ads dashboard showing tweets from Twitter users talking about TV commercials. At first glance they look like real tweets. But if you did a quick searched, it was clear that while the Twitter users who are featured are real, their tweets were not. And as it turned out, these users were unaware their profile pics and accounts were being presented in a post on Twitter’s blog. Twitter has since apologized in a Tweet and have deleted the original images used in that blog post. 

Unlike Facebook, where you might expect for your photos or profile image to be used in advertisements, provided you haven't updated your privacy settings, Twitter users had no idea that similar things could happen to them. 

Custom Scheduling Comes to Buffer

If you haven't given up Tweeting, Buffer's new tool might give your time management skills a lift. The social media productivity app has released Custom Scheduling. It's been one of the most requested features for Buffer over the past few years and the company finally delivered. The new feature allows users to custom schedule anything they want, including custom scheduling retweets right from 


I know what you're thinking -- what's the difference between a buffered Tweet and a scheduled Tweet? According to Buffer, the key difference is specificity. A buffered tweet is set up to deliver Tweets over the course of a day, spaced out accordingly. While a custom scheduled Tweet is one that goes out precisely when you want it to. 

Embed that Infographic

SlideShare announced that users can now include fully optimized infographics on their SlideShare accounts. Previously users could technically upload infographics as a document, but the viewing player wasn't optimized properly for the content. Now, infographics can be easily uploaded, viewed, embedded, and shared from within SlideShare. Here's an example of what an embedded infographic will look like: 

By bringing infographics to SlideShare, the company has made it easier for designers to add their graphics to their online portfolios, which can be easily linked to one's LinkedIn pages and shared across social media. Additionally, it gives infographics a nicer way to be displayed than just as an image file.