HOT TOPICS: Customer Experience Marketing Automation Social Business SharePoint 2013 Document Management Big Data Mobile DAM

Document Management, Document Management Software

Cloud Storage, Shadow IT and the Real Question to Ask

The battle for file sharing and storage has been happening for a while, but things started heating up when Microsoft decided to offer OneDrive for Business as a standalone service — it took a direct hit at Box and Dropbox. The question is, does it really have an advantage?

What Box's (Supposed) Delayed IPO Might Suggest

Wall St Bull by Asa Aarons.jpg

If it’s true that Box has delayed its IPO, then we have one thing to say. Told you so.

We called it last week when we couldn’t find any signs that the enterprise file-sharing (EFSS) startup had embarked on its pre-IPO road show. It was hard for us to believe the company’s CEO, Aaron Levie, could dazzle potential investors without making so much as peep.

After all, Levie is smart, funny and he’s even a former magician. Suffice to say, he knows how to work a crowd.

But he didn’t get to do that last night. Not even on Twitter.

Box filed the paperwork for an initial public offering in late March, and announced its intention to trade on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol "BOX." But we wonder: Are the bulls getting anxious on Wall St.?

Game On! Industry Responds to OneDrive for Business

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella's vision of “Cloud for everyone, on every device” no doubt includes Enterprise File Sync and Share (EFSS).

Earlier this week the company put Box, and almost every other vendor in the space, on notice with a blog post, “Thinking outside of the Box.”  

Its author, John Case, corporate vice president of Microsoft’s Office Division, had a fairly simple message for the marketplace:

The era of making isolated, single-solution decisions is rapidly coming to a close. Smart businesses are now choosing partners that have a holistic, comprehensive and connected set of cloud offerings and in doing so, creating a 'data culture' in their organization.”

In other words, Microsoft users should look to OneDrive for Business as the way to go for EFSS.

When you take into account that 670 million users use Microsoft Office and Office 365, what Microsoft’s message boils down to is pretty simple: If you’re a point EFSS solution in our world, you’re redundant.

Microsoft's OneDrive for Business is No Slam Dunk

There’s no place like Microsoft, and there’s no need to leave.

That’s what the world’s largest software company hopes you’ll believe when you get a look at OneDrive for Business, its Enterprise File Sync and Share (EFSS) service.

While there’s nothing wrong with the idea — being everything to everyone isn’t a bad business strategy, if the community appreciates it and you can pull it off. And Microsoft thinks it’s off to good start. It owns the desktop, after all. Most of us have grown up using and are now raising kids who also use Word, Excel, PowerPoint …

So, earlier this week, when John Case, corporate vice president of Microsoft’s Office Division, announced the company would be increasing the default storage on its EFSS offering from 25GB to 1 TB, it seemed like a sweet deal. In fact, it still does. Ditto for granting the same allotment to Office 365 ProPlus subscribers.

But is giving away extra storage the winning ticket in the EFSS space?

Probably not.

OpenText Expands, More Companies Offer Salesforce Integration

document-management-roll-up.jpg

It’s been a busy few weeks in the document management space. OpenText announced it will be doubling its workforce in Canada in the next seven years and Perceptive released Content 7.

For those using Salesforce.com, SpringCM and Steelbrick have teamed up to provide sales lifecycle management, while Oris4 is connecting SharePoint and Salesforce.com. We also took a look at managing metadata in SharePoint.

Why Box's Bad Financials Might Be Right on the Money

2014-21-April-box-cofounders.jpg

In the weeks surrounding Box’s initial public offering announcement, the enterprise file sync and share vendor (EFSS) and its founder, Aaron Levie, couldn’t make enough news.

There was a mention of Levie’s appearance at SXSW and his name-dropping about Ashton Kutcher being an investor. And there was boxdev, Box’s Developers conference, which intended to build a community of 1,000 plus developers and give them the tools that they need to build rich solutions around Box.

While each of the aforementioned went off fabulously well, the IPO announcement sandwiched in between left the reputations of both Levie and Box less than optimal.

Why? Because Box’s S-1 filing revealed the company is spending much more than it is making — specifically, for every one dollar the company takes in, it spends $1.38.

Selectica CEO Boasts 'We're Like a CMS on Steroids'

Blaine.jpgSelectica CEO Blaine Mathieu said the latest version of his company's contract management solution makes it easier for corporate executives and their teams to control risk, create opportunities and deliver business value.

The company's Contract Lifecycle Management (CLM) version 6 release includes a host of additional features, including advanced integrations with DocuSign and Salesforce, added support for Microsoft Office and new contract packages that enable users to create and version multiple contracts with a variety of templates as well as check-out, check-in and compare documents simultaneously.

It also offers a variety of customer experience enhancements, including improved search, faster navigation and an improved user interface.

The SharePoint Information Governance Problem

The SharePoint Information Governance ProblemIf you have any experience with SharePoint as a document management platform today, you know that most organizations struggle to use it effectively. You’re also likely familiar with the negative impacts that typically result from using SharePoint ineffectively: a proliferation of sites, often on a proliferation of SharePoint versions, with no clear standards on what documents should (and shouldn’t) be stored there or how, no clear guidelines for users on how to classify their documents, little to no capabilities for promoting effective information lifecycle management, little to no end user governance or oversight for things like site and document library structures, security and access settings, or document hygiene, and dozens, hundreds or even thousands of orphaned sites that, taken together, represent a digital landfill of staggering proportions.

Microsoft Takes Office to the Chrome Store

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Microsoft's Satya Nadella annoucning Office for iPad.jpg

Only two weeks after Office landed on iPad and about eight weeks since it made it easy to find through the launch of Office.com, Microsoft is chasing users wherever it can find them — and in this case it's Chrome Web Store, right in the middle of Google’s own stomping ground.

It also appears to have quietly retired its Scroogled campaign.

It would probably be a bit silly to overestimate the real impact of this, given that users were always able to access Office apps through the Office.com in the Chrome browser. But with a new CEO on board, any sign of changes in the way Microsoft is doing business should be paid attention to. 
 

Is Dropbox's Condoleezza Problem Gone?

2014-14-April-SS-Condoleezza-Rice-320.jpg

It was supposed to be a feel-good week for Dropbox. CEO Drew Houston unveiled a handsome stack of new, well-received products. Then he invited Condoleezza Rice to serve on his board.

We’ll get to that problem in a second, first a recap of the other Dropbox announcements.

It was with great delight last Wednesday that Houston introduced Carousel, a place in the Cloud where you could store the pictures and videos of your life and access them from any device. The user experience is not only delightful, but it also has some interesting filters and features which, in comparison, make Instagram less cool.

This Week: Hackers Take Over B2B Site + Game-Changer for Big Data

No One's Safe From Hackers
A distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack employed an apparently unprecedented technique to cause thousands of online video viewers to unwittingly bombard a B2B e-commerce website with junk traffic.

Marketing Tips by the Bay
Marketo was in San Francisco for the Marketing Nation Summit to tout its customer experience platform and discuss making emails more human among other topics. Meanwhile, Forrester swooped into the Bay Area and stressed that marketing campaigns are dead.

SharePoint's Mobile Challenges
While changes to Office don't equate changes to SharePoint, the iPad launch spurred on a broader discussion amongst critics of the faults with SharePoint's mobile collaboration capabilities.

Content Catch-up in Mobile Enterprise
As companies work to extract value from mobile disruption, delivering a consistent experience across devices as their biggest challenge.

Office 365 Moving Essentials
Making the case to move to Office 365? These 10 talking points should help you explain your recommendations to management.

Top 7 Success Factors for Optimizing Customer Experience
Improve your marketing efficiency and realize the complete benefits of optimizing customer experience.
Download White Paper

sponsored item

Most Popular

Editor's Picks

Around the Web

Featured Events (all events | post your event)

Featured Research 

Alfresco CTO: Intelligent, Adaptable, Amazing Tech Ahead

2014-10-April-John-Newton.jpg

John Newton has a vision of what technology and enterprise collaboration will look like in 2024. 

Trust these future goggles. They've got plenty of experience. Newton is the CTO and chairman of Alfresco, an open source enterprise content management provider. But back in 1990, he co-founded, designed and led the development of Documentum, which was later acquired by EMC.

"Assuming that it continues on more or less the pace it has so far, and there’s no reason not to think that, there is some amazing stuff that’s possible," Newton told CMSWire in a phone interview from the AIIM Conference this month, where he spoke. "Extremely high resolution displays. Virtual reality types of devices. New ways of inputting into computers. A lot of wearable technology that will go beyond the consumer stuff and actually make systems more usable for us."

Dropbox's Enterprise Invasion Starts Now

And there’s a prize inside …

Hey CIO, you can stop pulling out your hair, Dropbox is going to help you gain control of your rogue company files.

There’s no one that can do this the way Dropbox can — they claim 275 million (passionate) users.

Metalogix Tackles Those Tricky Email Migrations

Metalogix Email Migrator 3.jpg

Very soon, your organization is going to be moving a large amount of content to the cloud, for financial reasons if nothing else. That can be especially tricky when the content involves email, which brings its own set of headaches.

Metalogix says it can ease your pain with its recently released Email Migrator 3.0, which enables organizations migrate mailboxes to another Exchange server or Office 365.

What BeyondRecognition Brings to Document Management

Ever heard of BeyondRecognition? If not, the time to learn is now. The Chantilly, Va.-based "document textnology" software provider offers document managers an alternative to optical character recognition (OCR), while delivering results with accuracy and speed.

OpenText Wants to Shut the Box

Talk about a roller coaster. The last two weeks have been full of highs and lows for Box co-founder and CEO Aaron Levie.

Last Monday, Box filed its S-1 on its way to an IPO.  Instead of elation, most market watchers reacted with shock — and not the good kind. The Enterprise File Sync and Share (EFSS) company revealed losses of $168 million on revenue of $124 million. Even those who adore Levie called those stats “horrific”.

On Wednesday, Box held its first developers conference boxdev — Levie’s big shot supporters, like former Microsoft Windows’ chief Steven Sinofsky, were there, as well as VC’s  like Jerry Chen of Greylock Partners, Ben Horowitz of Andreessen Horowitz, Mamoon Hamid General Partner — The Social+Capital Partnership, and several others. And the developers building solutions on top of Box’s platform were there for the lovefest as well. Levie was clearly king for a day.

But then Friday Box rival, Dropbox, revealed it had just purchased Readmill, a German company whose collaborative and social features could provide Dropbox with the same functionalities as Box’s Box View, which it announced at boxdev.

And then late last night OpenText, one of the top companies in the Enterprise Information Management space, announced it was seeking preliminary and permanent injunctions halting the sale of Box's products in connection with an ongoing patent infringement lawsuit.

Dropbox Bought Readmill - We Know Why

Or at least we think we know why.

On Friday, as you were heading out for happy hour, we found out that Dropbox had acquired Readmill, a reading app that allows users to do things like highlight passages, take notes and share notes as they read, discuss passages and so on.

Will Box Developers Make @Levie King?

Aaron Levie at Conference.jpg

You could sense the excitement around Box’s first developers conference before it even began — there was an all-star line-up of venture capitalists, tech executives and, of course, Box’s own CEO, Aaron Levie on the agenda. The night before there was a picture of Levie rehearsing his keynote, in what looked to be peach-colored pants posted on Instagram (they were not Khakis).

A Box employee had put up a tweet that links to a funny, old video of former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer shouting “developers, developers, developers” while sweating. He was taunting Levie that he would be calling Box developers to action in the very same way the following day.

No matter what you could point to, it was clear that yesterday was planned to be a big, potentially pivotal day for Box. A pivot which could move the company beyond its present status as cloud-based file sync and share provider to that of a platform vendor for computing’s next era.

Will the Box Bubble Start Deflating Now?

AaronLevie.jpg

Everyone seems to love Box, whether they use the cloud sync and storage company’s products or not.

Aaron Levie, the company’s co-founder and CEO, seems to be the perfect front man for a generation of digital natives that refuses to be tethered to their desks, to be told where to keep their “things” or to be asked to tone it down when they know it is their birthright to be bold.

More than eight years ago, Levie and his high school buddies stepped outside of their dorm rooms and committed their brains, their energies and their brawn to build a service that provides companies and individuals with the ability to store and synchronize their documents and other content in the cloud which they can later access from anywhere, at any time, via (almost) any device.

Their timing was perfect — within a few short years mobile devices emerged as our windows to the world and everyone wanted to keep their documents, and other content in the Cloud.

Box quickly became one of the most talked about companies in Silicon Valley.

That hasn’t changed. In fact the chatter just got louder.

Yesterday, via Twitter, Levie announced that Box was filing an initial public offering.

OneDrive for Business Takes On SharePoint

OneDrive for Business is Microsoft’s file sync, share and collaboration service. It used to be part of Office 365, but that has now changed.

Microsoft announced that OneDrive for Business will become available as a standalone subscription service on March 3. This is good news for those who want the simplicity of Dropbox, but the security and control of Office 365.

While some might see this as competition for the usual suspects in the file sharing space — Dropbox, Box, Google Drive — I think it's a possible alternative to another, namely, SharePoint.