Hyland Software.jpg If enterprise content management systems improve efficiency in the enterprise, imagine what it could do for public facing public sector services. That’s exactly what Hyland Software (news, site) is going to find out when it extends its OnBase ECM to the public via PFU public kiosks.

The new partnership will see the kiosks, which will act as a front end to industry-specific OnBase ECM deployments, being made available to the public in government, healthcare and higher education offices and aims to make the management of documents so easy that members of the public will be able to do it themselves.

The objective is to cut the amount of work that public service workers have to do themselves by introducing public self-service in many situations such as information requests, medical consent forms and student self-registration.

Computers In Kiosks

Kiosks will be familiar to many people already. Designed for public use in public service centers they are interactive systems that consist of a computer and display screen and allow people to input requests and information.PFU_Kiosk_2010.jpg
Hyland/PFU Kiosk

However, it differs slightly from standard computers in that it is designed for specific purposes with specific applications only designed with a particular user in mind.

PFU, a subsidiary of Fujitsu, specializes in producing computer hardware, peripheral and enterprise software and systems, and has only recently entered the US market with its kiosks.

OnBase, Kiosks And The Government

Obviously though, PFU lacked the accumulated experience that a vendor already working with public service has, not to mention software that could work in a public sector environment, so it has teamed up with Hyland Software who has adapted its OnBase software for:

  • Government: Gives member of the public more comprehensive access to data in shorter time frames.
  • Healthcare: Speeds up administration processes required before care can be given.
  • Higher Education: Speeds up time-consuming tasks -- like registration -- that can be done by students themselves.

OnBase On Site

Behind all this is OnBase. OnBase Integrated Document Management and Workflow software can manage and optimize complex business processes, but also allows clients -- in this case government organizations -- to pick and choose which particular items they want in a package.

It has both on-premise and SaaS editions both of which seem suitable for the kiosks and offer many advanced features such as:

  • Standalone solution for managing business processes
  • Point-and-click configuration for rapid deployment
  • Usable, effective rules processor
  • Line-of-business application-centric, task execution
  • Load balancing
  • Simultaneous notification
  • Automatic criteria calculation
  • Reporting plug-ins

In fact, there is a whole range of features that will be suitable for government agencies where Hyland already has a strong foothold, particularly in the area of healthcare.

The extension of enterprise content management to public use is a novelty for the moment, but sounds like a good idea if it makes front-end services more efficient. Of course there is always the human element to consider and whether the time saved by the public using OnBase will be used constructively elsewhere.