In addition to the good stuff  -- social media participation strategies, mobile productivity, etc. -- these final weeks of our expert enterprise collaboration party addressed how enterprise 2.0 is failing to deliver, and why it might not be a good fit for your organization at all. 

  • The Importance of Context: Why Enterprise 2.0 Still Fails to Deliver Value. Enterprise 2.0 has been cited by analysts, vendors and consumers as one of the most important emerging trends in business technology in the last decade. Yet we still haven’t witnessed a glut of measurably successful Enterprise 2.0 deployments.
  • This is not a measurability problem — it stems primarily from the rampant misapplication of consumer technologies in the form of point applications. As the name indicates, Enterprise 2.0 requires enterprise-ready technologies. This requires more than tossing handfuls of disconnected and undirected blogs, forums, social networks, micro-blogs and wikis into the enterprise. Indeed, successful Enterprise 2.0 deployments begin by focusing on business problems and succeed by creating an integrated enterprise solution.

  • Maybe Enterprise 2.0 Just Isn’t for You. I used to think any company could benefit from collaboration, and the sooner the better. That was before a project with everything going for it — budget, executive support — went sideways, and I came to an important realization: readiness is vital. If your organization isn’t ready for E2.0, don’t push it. 
  • 5 Steps for a Successful Social Knowledge Network Implementation. While using social media technologies for business has been gaining momentum, understanding how to most effectively take advantage of these tools across the enterprise is still evolving. Here are 5 steps to successfully implement your social knowledge network (SKN).
  • Enterprise 2.0: Increase Productivity and Extend Reach via Mobile. Thinking of deploying Enterprise 2.0 solutions in your organization? Here's a little advice on how to do and how it increases productivity — especially if you include access via mobile devices.
  • 3 Ways Documents are Related to Enterprise Collaboration. Documents are a big part of our work lives and rarely do we work on them alone. So document centric collaboration isn't new, but the way in which we do it is changing.
  • Enterprise Collaboration: Get Your ROI Right. If you’ve been following the evolution of the enterprise collaboration space over the last 12 — 18 months, you may have noticed two attitudes toward the ROI of collaboration technologies. The first views collaboration tools as an expense that needs to be justified in order for organizations to decide whether to adopt them or not. The second views collaboration tools as an expense that needs no justification, akin to email or shared drives — the question for organizations is not whether, but what, when and how.
  • Developing Strategies for Enterprise Participation in Social Media. The rules of the game are changing, and they’re changing faster than ever before. You’ve seen the signs because they have been there for quite some time. Yet, if you’re like many organizations out there, you’re not sure how best to engage or even where to start.
  • The Long Hill for Enterprise Collaboration. Enterprise Collaboration has been dear to the hearts and minds of the Content Management world for quite some time.
  • Every few years, there are waves of exciting new products that offer to enhance collaboration for the average worker, but adoption always seems slow. Why? For the answer to the question, let’s turn to the market leader — email.

  • Global Collaboration Survey Reveals Collaboration Challenge. Collaboration technologies are changing the business culture. In an age of real-time collaboration and instant expectations, meaningful collaboration can mean the difference between success and failure. And, it is fast becoming perceived as essential for business success.
  • A recent global survey of 538 C-level executives and IT decision-makers, conducted by Kelton Research, shows that companies perceive clear value from employee collaboration services and software. However, while there are perceived and real business benefits, executives and IT decision-makers also recognize specific risks in collaboration.

  • Social Media Is Challenging Notions of the Data, Information, Knowledge, Wisdom (DIKW) Hierarchy
  • The Data, Information, Knowledge, Wisdom (DIKW) hierarchy is a uniquely relevant topic as social technologies take hold and challenge not only the relationships between data, information and knowledge within enterprise organizations, but also how information and knowledge are captured and transferred amongst your staff.