Social Computing is a hot topic, especially when it comes to implementing it in the enterprise. Here's a guide to what we've covered recently in this rapidly expanding marketplace.

1. Don't make an E2.0 Boo Boo

2009 seems to be the year that Enterprise 2.0 was finally accepted by the general mass of enterprises. Of course, when lots of companies start playing with new toys a lot of mistakes can be made. Andrew McAfee came up with a list of things not to do that any company would do well to read and follow.

2. Salesforce Chatter Gets the Market Gossiping

Things don't get much bigger in Enterprise 2.0 than the juggernaut that is Salesforce.com and they created waves this month by adding social and collaborative features to its long-standing Web-based platform. Called Chatter, it opens the way for developers to create enterprise-class tools to rival those in the consumer space.

3. Get a Hold on Enterprise 2.0

November saw the Defrag 2009 Conference take place and it was a great spot to pick up information on the latest systems, techniques and paradigms. A presentation on Exchanging Ideas to Increase Productivity was just one that can help show the way. Anyone coming at Enterprise 2.0 from a standing start will do well to read this and our other round-ups from the event.

4. Solutions for the Little Guy

Enterprise 2.0 isn't all about giant corporations, there are lots of smaller vendors producing products for smaller-sized companies to use. The latest of these is from Ubidesk and features SharePoint-style collaboration, document and management features at a not-so executive cost. Getting workers talking is half the key to a successful project and products like this encourage conferring and discussion.

5. Embrace Social Media

Companies need a good reason to invest in technology in these straitened times. Our social-setting article gives some fundamental reasons plus the pros and cons on why your organization should join in the fun. We also look at some of the tools you should use and how they can make an impression on the bottom line.