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Latest Information Management News & Articles

HP and Oracle: 2 Big Fish Play Nice Together

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Sometimes the big boys play nice with one another, like Adobe and SAP.

This week, HP and Oracle are playing nice — or at least their technologies are.

This is the tech world, after all, and vendors realize their customers use other vendors here and there.

HP is trying to capitalize on this with its new pre-engineered solution designed to help enterprises move their Oracle application workloads in the cloud.

It continues a tech relationship that began with Oracle in the 1980s.

"This capability can benefit most Oracle clients that are currently running E-Business Suite, PeopleSoft or Siebel, so the base of clients that can benefit from this pre-packaged solution by HP is very large," said Robert Hildenbrand, vice president of worldwide Oracle Applications Services for HP Enterprise Services.

A Primer on Cloud Options

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The question for most organizations today is not if they will be moving all or part of their business to the cloud, but when and how. Agility is the name of the game as the demands of an ever-growing global workforces become greater, and a move to the cloud just makes sense — technologically and for the business.

The advantages of taking your business operations into the cloud have been well-documented: high levels of scalability, a decrease in IT costs and a mobile work environment that allows your employees to plug in and be productive from anywhere. For productivity, most businesses are choosing between two options — Software as a Service (SaaS) and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) — while some turn to Platform as a Service (PaaS) to create software that is then delivered over the Web.

So how should you decide as a business which setup is best for you? Let’s look at the options.

Digital Disruption's Unglamourous Side: Digital Governance

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Most global enterprises look to digital transformation as the only way to remain competitive. They also view it as an opportunity to increase multi-channel customer engagement while reducing IT infrastructure costs.

But some enterprises are slow to adapt to today’s technological evolution. While the idea of flying cars is a ways off, the idea of implementing cloud applications and big data analytics shouldn’t be just as far-fetched. A number of reasons explain why some still live in the offline ages, one of the bigger ones being lack of understanding. Why fix what isn't broke?

OpenText Digs into Analytics with B2B Network Integration

OpenText will be focusing a lot on analytics in the next few months, according to recent comments company Mark Barrenechea made in connection with the Actuate acquisition.

Last night, the Waterloo, Ontario-based software company lived up to that promise by announcing that it was adding analytics to its B2B integration network, Trading Grid. According to a statement from OpenText, the new analytics are for companies that are looking for deeper insight into their business processes and the ability to tweak those process with data rather than guesswork.

No Country for Old Sales Reps

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Software sales is not the most venerable vocation in the ECM industry. It might be the least. Really good reps are few and far between.

You know the old saying that “no man can serve two masters”? It takes an exceptional human being to cope — week-in and week-out — with the frontline pressure of delivering revenue to their company while at the same time thinking strategically about their customer’s needs and serving their best interest.

10 Cloud Roadblocks and What to Do About Them

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As organizations face growing pressure to properly manage their digital content growth, cloud vendors have been marching out a series of improvements in an attempt to gain their favor. One such example is Microsoft’s recent announcement about achieving ISO 27018 and HITRUST compliance. Consumer cloud services are ubiquitous and cloud adoption is steadily climbing in the enterprise. Yet IT organizations still lack experience on how to approach cloud services.

More SharePoint 2013 Search Tips for Power Users

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As a power user of SharePoint you may wonder how to make the most of all of the search features in SharePoint 2013. We covered Continuous Crawl, Content Search Web Part and Query Rules previously, so let's take a deep dive into Search Schema and the new Refinement Panel.

6 Key Facts the C-Suite Should Know About Windows 10

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This fall, Microsoft will issue the general release of the next version of its operating system to both consumers and enterprises.

Windows 10 will very likely be the last major upgrade that Microsoft will ever offer. After that, updates will be incremental and instantaneous. Meanwhile, your business may be humming right along with Windows 7.

So when you’re talking about Windows 10 in the boardroom, here are the basic facts you should bring up.

IBM Finally Builds a Solid Cloud Platform #IBMInterConnect

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After nearly two years of attempting to redefine “cloud” to mean “the hodgepodge of services IBM has cobbled together,” IBM this week put forward a clear and respectable vision of a viable software-defined data center that organizations can actually, finally put to use.

“It all is going to come down to digitization,” said Don Rippert, IBM's general manager for cloud services strategy during a keynote session Monday at IBM’s InterConnect 2015 conference in Las Vegas.

He was referring to the IBM philosophy put forth in October 2013 in a report entitled, “The Customer-Activated Enterprise.” The report explains that modern customer experiences are only feasible by engaging customers on a digital level.

“You’ve heard it over and over again,” said Rippert. “We’re going to keep saying it until you guys demand we stop saying it or until you believe it — I don’t know which. The beatings will continue until morale improves.”

IBM Promises a Better Hybrid Cloud at #IBMInterConnect

IBM is making its focus on the hybrid cloud clear at its InterConnect conference in Las Vegas this week.

Big Blue has already announced a series of initiatives, including new releases and new functionality around existing releases, along with news about multiple new data centers. It also revealed plans to move at least half of its cloud development team into is hybrid cloud computing business.

Keeping SharePoint In Check with Information Governance

Historically, SharePoint was thought to cause as many information governance problems as it solved. The 2001 to 2003 versions did not show Microsoft putting much effort into helping customers with information governance. But after the massive take up of SharePoint Portal Server 2007 licenses, and the often negative conversations coming out of the sizable SharePoint user community, Microsoft started to take governance issues seriously. Governance-focused sessions started popping up at the conferences, and governance articles and check lists made an appearance on TechNet.

Why You Should Be Worried (and Angry) About Lenovo

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By now, the entire tech world has heard all about the egg on Lenovo’s face. The incident — Superfish’s catastrophic security screw-up — was all over the news last week: "New Lenovo PCs shipped with factory-installed adware," said Engadget. "Lenovo poisoned its own PCs with Superfish adware," from CNET. "Lenovo caught preloading 'Superfish' adware on laptops," according to TechSpot.

The coverage has been extensive, detailed and informative. There’s one big problem with it, though: it’s all wrong.

Superfish is far, far worse than anything those articles might have led you to believe. It’s more accurate to say that it’s a near-total gutting of your machine’s network security. Security analyst Marc Rogers described Superfish as “quite possibly the single worst thing I have seen a manufacturer do to its customer base.” Here’s why.

Buyer Beware: Demystifying Open Source Software Licenses

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Not too long ago, acquiring software was pretty easy: gather requirements, meet with vendors to evaluate products, select the winner. Legal review took place late in the process, and the final terms that both customer and vendor could live with were generally agreed to quickly.

That was then. This is now.

Can Lenovo Regain Consumer Trust After Secretly Installing Adware?

Sometimes it's not enough to say you're sorry. Take Lenovo. The $40-billion-a-year Beijing, China-based tech company admitted it was wrong to pre-install third-party adware on some of its consumer notebooks last fall.

But it's not off the hook yet. Users and industry analysts claim the company betrayed its consumers by using a "virulent, evil adware" called Superfish Visual Discovery to attack secure connections, access sensitive data and inject advertising. 

"Lenovo sold out their customers for some extra cash," said Marc Rogers, a 20-year tech security industry veteran, principal security researcher at San Francisco-based CloudFare and security blogger. "In doing that, it completely crippled one of the key security controls that customers rely on when using the Internet — SSL."

Microsoft Leaks Offer a Glimpse of SharePoint 2016

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Microsoft has started leaking news about SharePoint 2016 — and they suggest the company plans to showcase an early edition at Ignite, its upcoming all-in-one conference for everyone from senior decision makers, IT pros and "big thinkers" and to enterprise developers and architects. 

In a just released podcast, Bill Baer, senior product manager for SharePoint, said the company will offer a look at the latest version of SharePoint at the conference, which will be held in Chicago from May 4 through 8.

What Information Managers Can Learn from Athletes

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Have you ever read the biography of a champion athlete? I love reading biographies, but these are my favorite. They usually go a little like this: the future champ starts off as the underdog, but through a mix of talent, strategy, grit and determination becomes the victor. Books about using the principles of sports in corporate strategy are also good reads, although I was probably the last person in America to read “Moneyball.”

All this reading makes me think about applying championship strategies to information management. As in, why don’t we? We should.

Embracing Change in the Digital Workplace

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Today we begin a new beat here at CMSWire: software-defined systems.  I know. Your marketing buzzword alarm has just sounded, and you may be wondering just how quickly you can reach for the Back button. 

But follow me a moment.  If you’re one of the many dozens of readers I’ve collected over the years, you know that I’ve never been one to swallow the bait — or more importantly, to pass it on to you so you’ll swallow it.

Up to now, technology publications have treated hardware and software as separate fields from one another, as different as geology from astronomy.  So the applications that businesses ran, such as content management systems, were believed to be of interest to a person unique from the one who buys the processors or rigs the network.

But something very important happened in the past five years:  The systems on which services such as the content management systems (CMS) ran moved from a hardware platform to a software platform.  Rather than processors running the CMS — or the enterprise resource planning (ERP), business process management (BPM), digital asset management (DAM) or customer relationship management (CRM) — new classes of processors sustain the software that runs the CMS.  That layer of software, made feasible by virtualization, is fluid, flexible and mobile. 

Don't Open Your Email: Agari Warns Malicious Messages Have Soared

It's hard to quiet the voice of Paul McCartney when you read through Agari's latest study on The State of Email Trust. All you have to do is read the introductory paragraph of the report, which the security solutions provider released today:

Email security improved somewhat in 2014, but most companies still haven’t implemented technology that prevents cyber criminals from sending messages that appear to come from their domains — a failure that leaves customers vulnerable to phishing attacks." 

Think about that for just a moment — and odds are you, too, can visualize McCartney's words:

Someone's knockin' at the door
Somebody's ringin' the bell
Do me a favor,
Open the door and let 'em in." 

Businesses are unwittingly opening the door to cybercriminals who trick people into sharing sensitive information, leading to identity theft and other crimes. 

What's more, because victims of phishing attacks often blame the companies they thought sent the forged emails, the attacks erode the trust companies spend years building with customers.

Success Means Back to Basics for Content Management

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It's a crazy world in content management these days. The dying term "enterprise content management" lives on out of sheer momentum. Information governance is on the rise. The cloud is making everyone reconsider their basic understanding of how they build and deliver business solutions. Mobile devices have returned IT departments to the manic days of early laptops. And the Internet of Things threatens to overwhelm IT before they finish tackling mobile.

Established vendors scramble to look relevant and innovative in the midst of the chaos, while new vendors strive to poach the most dissatisfied customers. Roadmap discussions share features that are two years too late or are subject to immediate change because the technology is shifting too fast.

'Managing Chaos': The Long, Winding Road to Digital Governance

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Governance is a lot of different things to a lot of different people. For records managers it's all about metadata. For C-level managers it's a way of preventing lawsuits. For others it's an organizational straitjacket.

This week Lisa Welchman published her much anticipated book on digital governance, "Managing Chaos." Welchman is a recognized expert in the digital governance field and president of Digital Governance Frameworks at ActiveStandards. I could't wait to read this book. And (spoiler alert) — I was not disappointed.

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