GoDaddy Launches Data Center on Demand, Making Cloud Computing More Competitive
Cloud computing and hosting just got more competitive as domain registrar GoDaddy (news, site) joins in on the game with a new service called Data Center on Demand. With the new IaaS offering, GoDaddy is competing directly with the likes of Amazon AWS and Rackspace Cloud.

GoDaddy has been offering shared hosting, virtual dedicated servers and dedicated servers for some time now, although this would be the company's first chance at getting into the cloud computing market. The new IaaS service is already under a limited release, and GoDaddy plans to launch to the public this coming July. The service basically lets users "create a virtual data center with multiple servers working together," that can "dynamically grow or shrink your environment as needed." Data Center on Demand features load balancing, multiple networks and templates for cloud environments.

GoDaddy's cloud computing service

GoDaddy's cloud computing service

Technical Expertise Required?

Godaddy's IaaS offering is reportedly more complicated than its competitors, as the service will require technical expertise. GoDaddy even goes as far as suggest that you should have dedicated IT staff to manage your cloud deployment as the service currently doesn't have control panels. GoDaddy promises easier management once the service is launched to the public, with Cloud.com's CloudStack private cloud software for the IaaS' resource-orchestration layer.

Will Pricing Win the Game for GoDaddy?

However, Data Center on Demand might have users wondering about the pricing scheme. Unlike most other cloud services that charge per resource usage, GoDaddy's service charges monthly fees for fixed resources. Other resources are then charged on a per-piece or pay-as-you go basis, with discounts for prepaid payments.

Plans range from US$ 49.99 to US$ 279.99 monthly starting with a single server with 1 GB RAM, 40 GB storage, and inclusive of unlimited inbound bandwidth and 100 GB outbound bandwidth. According to GoDaddy, the new service is targeted at medium to large enterprises, startup companies that plan to scale and web developers.

Being the largest domain registrar, GoDaddy might have enough clout to make the current kings of the hill in cloud computing -- such as Amazon AWS and Rackspace -- worry. GoDaddy is likely to use pricing as its competitive strategy, although we would have to wait and see if this approach will be attractive to end users.