It’s not official. But it’s just about certain that Microsoft plans to kill Internet Explorer (IE).

At the Convergence conference in Atlanta yesterday, Microsoft CMO Chris Capossela acknowledged the company is researching a new brand or new name for its browser.

This is not the first time Microsoft has hinted the end is near for IE. But it is the first time that anyone from Microsoft has addressed the subject directly.

By Any Name ...

Capossela told the audience the company is researching new branding or a new name for its browser should in Windows 10. "We’ll continue to have Internet Explorer, but we’ll also have a new browser called Project Spartan, which is codenamed Project Spartan. We have to name the thing," he said.

In short, the new browser for Windows 10 will not be IE.

But don't think IE will disappear overnight once Windows 10 is released. Those currently using legacy Windows versions are not all going to upgrade immediately.

So expect two browsers at least for a while: IE 11 and Spartan (or whatever it is eventually named).

Once users move to Windows 10, they’ll have to move to Spartan — and IE will slowly fade into the sunset.

The first evidence that Microsoft planned to replace IE emerged following the Windows 10 preview in January.

In response to questions that arose during the event, Microsoft published a blog post by Jason Weber, Group Program Manager, Internet Explorer. He noted that Windows 10 would ship with the browser codenamed Spartan.

He further claimed Spartan provides a more "reliable, and discoverable experience with advanced features including the ability to annotate on web pages, a distraction-free reading experience and integration of Cortana for finding and doing things online faster.”

Earlier this month, a ‘leaked’ video (if you believe in leaks from Microsoft) offered a lot more detail about Spartan.

Whether a new name will shake off IE’s poor reputation among users is the real question here. But given its current standing, it wouldn’t be hard to achieve some improvement.