Oracle Debuts Private Cloud, Infrastructure-as-a-Service #oowOracle
 has announced a new infrastructure-as-a-service, as CEO Larry Ellison termed it, and a Private Cloud service that is an extension of the existing Oracle cloud.

Private Cloud is a virtualized compute and storage service that runs all of Oracle's software and is completely compatible with the Public Cloud that debuted at OpenWorld 2011.

Oracle Now Competing Against Amazon

With a new model of selling as-needed compute power, Oracle is now competing against Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud (Ec2), Ellison said at his OpenWorld keynote speech Sept. 30. This new model of subscription-based computing is part of Oracle's cloud network, and is key to the Private Cloud concept.

screenshot-privatecloudopenworld-2012.jpg

Oracle Private Cloud lives in an on site data center.

Private Cloud hosts all of the apps a company needs, can scale, is compatible with other Oracle systems, and is installed on-site rather than on an Oracle server. Oracle manages and owns that infrastructure, however -- and that is why Ellison has taken to calling it an IaaS. 

Pluggable Database Unveiled

Ellison had four announcements in his OpenWorld address, and the second is called Database 12c (the c stands for cloud). It's a wrapper for databases that delivers multi-tenancy to the database layer. Plug in databases from many different sources, and Oracle can deliver all that information to one place.

While services like Salesforce.com offer multi-tenancy at the application layer, Ellison said that it's better to do it at the database layer. That's because security, reporting and auditing tools don't work as well in the application layer, he said.

screenshot-pluggabledatabaseopenworld-2012.jpg

Ellison called Database 12c the world's first multi-tenant database.

Database 12c will officially be available in 2013, so details were scant. Ellison did say the system would be much more efficient hardware-wise, while at the same time being able to run more databases. All week during the OpenWorld conference, more news will come out about the specifics of each of these releases. We also hope to hear which companies have actually signed up to use Private Cloud.