The State of Workforce Technology Adoption Relies on Data About How We Work
Last week Forrester taught us about the issues of mobile device management within the enterprise. The next day it released a report that helped us put it in perspective.

What Your Data Can Tell You About Productivity

In The State Of Workforce Technology Adoption: US Benchmark 2011 How US information Workers Adopt And Use Technology, Forrester provides baseline data from every US industry, department, and organization size, all so we can begin to gather our data about our own workforce technology levels. Having surveyed 4,985 US information workers, Forrester’s report analyzes the state of workforce technology adoption and behavior. Here’s what it uncovered.

Ultimately, what it found points to data. The more you know about how your employees work, how they communicate with one another (or how they don’t!), the tools they use and the applications they rely on to get work done, the better your organization can help to increase productivity and eliminate barriers.

For instance, it found that email and the browser are universally adopted across industries, while other methods of communication -- such as instant messaging, which only 27% of information workers use daily -- vary throughout. They also found that most laptop users typically stay in one place and that, for 20% of the information workforce that is both highly mobile and has access to large amounts of confidential information, smartphones can greatly increase the risk of information leaks.

What does this all tell us? It cries out: Look at your data.

The Art of Winning with Data

Recently, the movie Moneyball was released. Based on the book by the same name, written by Michael Lewis, Moneyball teaches us that it takes more than just a "good feeling"  about someone to make a baseball team win. Players who get on base help score runs, more so than relying on players who can only consistently hit home runs. In our case, the workforce is our team. For us to determine what makes us close more projects, make more widgets and make the most money, doesn’t it make sense to look at how we work?

Bring-your-own-device policies are already a reality in many US organizations. Accordingly to Forrester, 48% of information workers buy whatever smartphone they want and use it for work.

Bring-your-own-device policies are already a reality in many US organizations. Accordingly to Forrester, 48% of information workers buy whatever smartphone they want and use it for work.

Before we can begin to understand the impact that smartphones and tablet devices can have, we need to look at how they are currently being used. Thankfully, we’ve got Forrester to help us. In its report it outlines several scenarios in which data tells the story. From a Day in the Life of an Information Worker to how social collabortation tools are being used across generations, roles and responsibilities, one thing is clear: Your data tells a great story – you just have to ask the right questions and in turn, know what to do with the information.