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Latest Mobile Enterprise News & Articles

Why Your Boss Should Buy Your Next Watch

Somewhere not too far away Ebenezer Scrooge is licking his chops. He can’t wait until you get a smart watch. Whether it’s an Apple or Android, he doesn’t care. All he wants to do is suck a few more minutes of your precious life from you and a gift on your wrist is all it will take.

Except that he probably won’t even have to buy it. You’ll do the shopping and fork over your hard earned cash. Just so you can check last minute stats before the marketing call you’re about to make or be notified the second that your customer finally signs your purchase order.

The watch will make you a more productive worker. Regardless, we know it’s you that wants the watch. That you’re buying it so you can track your health and fitness. Listen to music on the run. And speak memos into your watch just like Dick Tracy.

But trust us, you’ll be using it for work, too, probably much more than you imagine. So why not have your boss fork over the cash for it, or at least subsidize it.

Get Ready for Apple Watch Wearing Employees

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1.2 million pre-orders of your newest wearable product in one day, resulting in $627 million on the books is not a bad day’s work.  

While the debates will continue on what the actual sales figures are for Apple Watch and other wearables, the real point is this: Apple Watch is creating a defining moment for wearables, as they cross over from technology gadgets to mass device consumption.

And what’s significant about mass adoption is that, in the age of consumerism, when it happens in the consumer base, enterprise adoption isn't far behind.    

It’s not just about Apple Watch sales, it’s also about the fact that its success will pull competing products into the market. They say a rising tide raises all boats. 

With the April 24 release date rapidly approaching, IT organizations don’t have much time to think through and adjust their policies (unless you plan on disabling Wifi and Bluetooth access on all your iPhones). 

So here are five things to consider when preparing your organization for this first wave of wearables about to bombard your enterprise.

HP Builds Mobile Compliance Cred With New Product

HP has planted a stake in the ground in a space of growing importance to companies: managing compliance and security in internal communications in the mobile environment.

Specifically, the company launched HP Connected MX, a product it describes as enabling "organizations to confidently deliver information accessibility to their mobile workforce while facilitating organization visibility, control and protection of information at the edge."

Translation: it is a connected back up solution that keeps employees and other internal users from accidentally or carelessly sending sensitive information to an insecure smartphone or laptop.

What You Should Know About Enterprise Mobility

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With all of the research and resources being poured into mobile, you’d think every single company would have a mobile strategy in place — and be hard at work executing it. However, the number is probably lower than you think.

According to a study by Lopez Research, more than 75 percent of enterprise companies surveyed concede their e-mail, calendar and contact applications are all they have enabled for mobile.

“The vast majority of businesses are either just getting started or are just starting to realize they need to accelerate their mobility needs,” said Adam Stein, vice president of mobile solution and product marketing for SAP.

“Twenty-five percent are using apps for workforce management, productivity gains and to improve the customer experience. And that really helps them make gains in the mobile organization."

Here's a Portrait of Your Typical Mobile Microsoft User

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The typical mobile user of Microsoft's collaboration tools — Office 365, SharePoint, Yammer and OneDrive — isn’t a social media maven, according to a survey of user habits. But he can't live without document access.

While that may not be much of a surprise (Microsoft is the platform for the serious office worker, after all) the following finding is: iOS is the dominant mobile browser by far for accessing documents and collaborating with Microsoft tools in the enterprise.

That's an eye-opening factoid given the number of Android phones in general in circulation and the only relatively recent inroads Apple has made in the enterprise, David Lavenda, VP of product strategy at harmon.ie, told CMSWire. 

Appcelerator Eyes Big Fish in Mobile App Dev Space

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Appcelerator, a Gartner mobile app developer leader, released a platform today that allegedly solves a pain point for mobile developers: integrating data into mobile apps.

The Mountain View, Calif.-based provider released Appcelerator Arrow, a framework for building and running mobile-optimized APIs. The feature is an addition to the two-year-old Appcelerator Platform.

"Data is the slowest, costliest and most complex aspect of mobile development," said Jeff Haynie, CEO of 70-employee Appcelerator, founded in 2006.

"Building a coherent, compelling and rich app experience means orchestrating data from a wide range of backend sources, which right now is Wild West of legacy formats and integration protocols. Arrow eases this data problem for mobile app developers."

Mobile Is Changing Your Social Collaboration Apps

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Social collaboration applications have been in a race since their inception to see which could be the most feature laden. It was an arms race of sorts, with each side adding more ways to communicate and collaborate and — in the process — becoming more monolithic.

Applications that started as simple activity feeds and corporate microblogging platforms blossomed into much bigger software systems. Modern enterprise social networks, for example, allow end-users to share all manner of content including files and audio. Some allow sharing of business objects which encapsulate data and actions associated with a business process.

Even basic lightweight task management — a specialty feature just a few years ago — has morphed into sophisticated workflows with metadata driven program logic and is available in the majority of social collaboration tools.  

Marc Benioff Shops Again, Buys Mobile Security Startup

Maybe Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff’s corporate shoppers were ducking in-and-out of SXSW sessions last month looking for smart acquisitions. If so, then they not only learned How to Rob a Bank, but also spotted a genius buy in Toopher.

Its co-founder and CTO Evan Grim, in his personal LinkedIn profile, describes Toopher as “an invisible, location-based multifactor authentication solution designed around user behavior and powered by your phone's location awareness."

Grim claims by blending strong technology with lean and thoughtful user experience, "Toopher automates the authentication process via your phone, making it 'go invisible' — not only preventing online fraud and identity theft, but creating a security solution that people actually want to use. No more passwords hacks, no more codes. It's simple, secure, and your phone stays in your pocket.”

Toopher’s hometown newspaper, the Austin American Statesman, confirmed the sale last night. The purchase price, as far as we can tell, hasn’t been revealed.

The company’s name,”Toopher” is a play on the term “two factor.”

Enterprise Mobile Messaging Not All the Rage

Enterprise mobile messaging is hot. Or is it?

Researchers at the Framingham, Mass.-based International Data Corporation (IDC) discovered sending messages through a mobile device may not exactly be setting the world on fire.

Business don't engage with mobile messaging technology (specifically SMS, MMS and push notifications) for operations, employee engagement and customer communications as much as some may think.

Workspot Offers Remote Desktops Without Virtual Desktops

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The rise of virtualization in the workplace has made us question the need for operating systems to be installed on our computers, just so we can use our software. And the rising proliferation of cloud-based software that can run in our browsers, demonstrates that we don’t even need great computers (or sometimes even good ones) to run good software.

But while we’re in a questioning mood, perhaps the way we run virtual desktops in the workplace deserves some fresh scrutiny. Specifically, if the real purpose of client-side devices, including the mobile kind, is to give us access to our services hosted elsewhere, then what is the desktop really for?

3 Ways Red Hat's 'Mobile Right' Strategy Changes Enterprise Apps

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Throughout the world, businesses have already moved to smaller, more mobile, more tactile screens as their means of interacting with critical business information. Cloud dynamics has made it easier for server-based applications to reach these people on their new devices.

So the Big Transition — worthy of capital letters — should already have happened. For many customer relationship management (CRM) users, it certainly has. Customer outreach platforms are reaching out to customers where they are. They are not on their PCs.

But for a great many users of ERP, BPM and — the big one — content management systems (CMS), their IT platforms do not yet employ mobile access models. There’s no app for everything you need to do to run a business. For too many web sites, the “mobile version” relies very heavily upon pinch-to-zoom.

Must all enterprise applications become mobile because their users are mobile? The answer to this question may not be what you expect, especially the one we received from Red Hat.

What's Taking So Long With Enterprise Mobility?

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Every year companies and research agencies conduct surveys to establish the current state of enterprise mobility within the business market. If you are one of those people who keep an eye on such reports you've probably noticed that the numbers haven't really changed much in the past couple of years.

So my question is, why?

Microsoft Boasts: 'Code Once and Send to Any Device' #MWC15

Microsoft has opened the box on its Windows 10 universal app platform at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain — and developers are expected to like what they see.

Kevin Gallo, director of Windows Developer Platform at Microsoft, said the platform advances Microsoft's development goals. It lets developers to code once and send that code to any Windows device, from a mobile phone or tablet to an Xbox console.

All of these Windows devices will now access a single Store for app acquisition, app distribution and updating.

What You've Been Missing: A Standard for Enterprise Apps

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If you’ve ever tried to set up Box, Workday, Oracle, SAP or one of many other Enterprise apps on an Enterprise Mobility Managed (EMM) device, you know it’s not fun.

In fact, chances are good you’ve downloaded a handful of apps you’ve never used — just because you couldn’t properly configure them.

“Public apps often get stuck on the device,” said Kabir Barday, lead product manager, application development at AirWatch by VMware.

Would-be users frequently become frustrated entering user names, passwords, server URLs and ports. Sometimes it’s cumbersome. Other times, they don’t have easy access to the required information.

The result? Error messages like “App can’t be displayed." But that’s not the biggest difficulty. The real problem is the loss of productivity.

Cool Stuff You're Missing at Mobile World Congress #MWC15

So what if it’s a little cloudy in Barcelona, Spain today. The high is 76 degrees Fahrenheit. Those of us who live in the US Northeast would certainly enjoy the reprieve from the snow and the cold.

But the weather isn’t the reason that we’d be near the shores of the Mediterranean today. The Mobile World Congress is the draw.

It’s the event where vendors like Samsung are unveiling iPhone rivals, where Microsoft is revealing its revamped mobile play and IBM is showing off the spawn of its marriage to Apple … and so much more.

Google Joins the BYOD Party

For a while it seemed that Google was so busy getting geeky with glasses and driverless cars that it was blind to the big opportunity directly in front of it — bringing enterprise level security to the nearly 1 billion Android mobile devices that, in some way or another, are used on the job or for work purposes every day.

“For many, these phones have become essential tools to help us complete important work tasks like checking email, editing documents, reviewing sales pipelines and approving deals,” said Rajen Sheth, director of product management, Android and Chrome for Work at Google.

“But for the majority of workers, smartphones and tablets are underutilized in the workplace,” he added, noting that the business and innovation potential on these devices is for the most part, untapped.

And though Google initially spoke about separating work data and personal data on mobile devices at its I/O Conference last June, it didn’t make Android for Work available to the masses until now.

Google Acquires Facebook Marketing Firm Toro

Google is back on the acquisition trail. Late last night it announced it had bought Toro, a startup that enables developers to market their apps on Facebook.

Originally known as Red Hot Labs, it was created by Amitt Mahajan and Joel Poloney, who had previously co-founded a MyMiniLife, a virtual world which users to create their own spaces and homes.

AirWatch by VMware Shakes Up Enterprise Mobility Management

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When VMware spent $1.54 billion to acquire Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) startup AirWatch last year, it raised plenty of eyebrows.

Some saw it as an act of desperation: VMware didn’t have a strong mobile play at a time when personal computers were becoming less and less of an endpoint.

Others saw it as brilliant: AirWatch understood something that many of its competitors did not — namely that “your smart phone or tablet is your computer” and that companies would need to go beyond safeguarding email and file sharing to protecting application data in transit as well.

As with any acquisition, there was also the question of integration. Would Palo Alto, Calif.-based VMware wreck everything that worked about Atlanta, Ga.-based AirWatch?

That doesn’t seem to have happened, especially in the wake of today's release of AirWatch8.

Do Enterprises Need a Secure Texting App?

Texting apps like WhatsApp, SnapChat and Viber are all the rage in the consumer space. But what about texting apps for the enterprise?

With more companies embracing bring your own device (BYOD), it's logical to assume there's a need for a secure enterprise texting solution. As Shaun Smith, technology practice director at Xceed Group, noted, that BYOD has its benefits — as long as companies conduct due diligence and weigh those benefits against the possible risks.

Enter ArmorText, a Reston, Va.-based company that's developing a secure messaging client for the enterprise, targeted specifically at those in regulated markets. The company has already raised nearly $2 million in outside funding.

ArmorText is positioning itself as the answer to BYOD security concerns: It claims its products and services will make BYOD the rule in the workplace rather than the exception.

Microsoft Ups Its Productivity Play With New Calendaring App

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It may seem like Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella is talking big sky when he makes bold statements, claiming his company will “reinvent productivity for a new generation,” a generation whose professional and personal lives are spent primarily in mobile apps and in the Cloud.

But if you look at what he’s been able to accomplish since last summer, it’s kind of daunting. Now you can not only access Office and many of its individual components via almost any mobile device, but your experiences with Microsoft’s apps are also on par with the best of what can be found in the App Store or on Google Play.

And if there’s a place where the Redmond, Wash. tech giant falls short, it doesn’t stay that way for very long. Not on Nadella’s watch.

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