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Latest Mobile Enterprise News & Articles

Workspot Offers Remote Desktops Without Virtual Desktops

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The rise of virtualization in the workplace has made us question the need for operating systems to be installed on our computers, just so we can use our software. And the rising proliferation of cloud-based software that can run in our browsers, demonstrates that we don’t even need great computers (or sometimes even good ones) to run good software.

But while we’re in a questioning mood, perhaps the way we run virtual desktops in the workplace deserves some fresh scrutiny. Specifically, if the real purpose of client-side devices, including the mobile kind, is to give us access to our services hosted elsewhere, then what is the desktop really for?

3 Ways Red Hat's 'Mobile Right' Strategy Changes Enterprise Apps

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Throughout the world, businesses have already moved to smaller, more mobile, more tactile screens as their means of interacting with critical business information. Cloud dynamics has made it easier for server-based applications to reach these people on their new devices.

So the Big Transition — worthy of capital letters — should already have happened. For many customer relationship management (CRM) users, it certainly has. Customer outreach platforms are reaching out to customers where they are. They are not on their PCs.

But for a great many users of ERP, BPM and — the big one — content management systems (CMS), their IT platforms do not yet employ mobile access models. There’s no app for everything you need to do to run a business. For too many web sites, the “mobile version” relies very heavily upon pinch-to-zoom.

Must all enterprise applications become mobile because their users are mobile? The answer to this question may not be what you expect, especially the one we received from Red Hat.

What's Taking So Long With Enterprise Mobility?

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Every year companies and research agencies conduct surveys to establish the current state of enterprise mobility within the business market. If you are one of those people who keep an eye on such reports you've probably noticed that the numbers haven't really changed much in the past couple of years.

So my question is, why?

Microsoft Boasts: 'Code Once and Send to Any Device' #MWC15

Microsoft has opened the box on its Windows 10 universal app platform at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain — and developers are expected to like what they see.

Kevin Gallo, director of Windows Developer Platform at Microsoft, said the platform advances Microsoft's development goals. It lets developers to code once and send that code to any Windows device, from a mobile phone or tablet to an Xbox console.

All of these Windows devices will now access a single Store for app acquisition, app distribution and updating.

What You've Been Missing: A Standard for Enterprise Apps

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If you’ve ever tried to set up Box, Workday, Oracle, SAP or one of many other Enterprise apps on an Enterprise Mobility Managed (EMM) device, you know it’s not fun.

In fact, chances are good you’ve downloaded a handful of apps you’ve never used — just because you couldn’t properly configure them.

“Public apps often get stuck on the device,” said Kabir Barday, lead product manager, application development at AirWatch by VMware.

Would-be users frequently become frustrated entering user names, passwords, server URLs and ports. Sometimes it’s cumbersome. Other times, they don’t have easy access to the required information.

The result? Error messages like “App can’t be displayed." But that’s not the biggest difficulty. The real problem is the loss of productivity.

Cool Stuff You're Missing at Mobile World Congress #MWC15

So what if it’s a little cloudy in Barcelona, Spain today. The high is 76 degrees Fahrenheit. Those of us who live in the US Northeast would certainly enjoy the reprieve from the snow and the cold.

But the weather isn’t the reason that we’d be near the shores of the Mediterranean today. The Mobile World Congress is the draw.

It’s the event where vendors like Samsung are unveiling iPhone rivals, where Microsoft is revealing its revamped mobile play and IBM is showing off the spawn of its marriage to Apple … and so much more.

Google Joins the BYOD Party

For a while it seemed that Google was so busy getting geeky with glasses and driverless cars that it was blind to the big opportunity directly in front of it — bringing enterprise level security to the nearly 1 billion Android mobile devices that, in some way or another, are used on the job or for work purposes every day.

“For many, these phones have become essential tools to help us complete important work tasks like checking email, editing documents, reviewing sales pipelines and approving deals,” said Rajen Sheth, director of product management, Android and Chrome for Work at Google.

“But for the majority of workers, smartphones and tablets are underutilized in the workplace,” he added, noting that the business and innovation potential on these devices is for the most part, untapped.

And though Google initially spoke about separating work data and personal data on mobile devices at its I/O Conference last June, it didn’t make Android for Work available to the masses until now.

Google Acquires Facebook Marketing Firm Toro

Google is back on the acquisition trail. Late last night it announced it had bought Toro, a startup that enables developers to market their apps on Facebook.

Originally known as Red Hot Labs, it was created by Amitt Mahajan and Joel Poloney, who had previously co-founded a MyMiniLife, a virtual world which users to create their own spaces and homes.

AirWatch by VMware Shakes Up Enterprise Mobility Management

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When VMware spent $1.54 billion to acquire Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) startup AirWatch last year, it raised plenty of eyebrows.

Some saw it as an act of desperation: VMware didn’t have a strong mobile play at a time when personal computers were becoming less and less of an endpoint.

Others saw it as brilliant: AirWatch understood something that many of its competitors did not — namely that “your smart phone or tablet is your computer” and that companies would need to go beyond safeguarding email and file sharing to protecting application data in transit as well.

As with any acquisition, there was also the question of integration. Would Palo Alto, Calif.-based VMware wreck everything that worked about Atlanta, Ga.-based AirWatch?

That doesn’t seem to have happened, especially in the wake of today's release of AirWatch8.

Do Enterprises Need a Secure Texting App?

Texting apps like WhatsApp, SnapChat and Viber are all the rage in the consumer space. But what about texting apps for the enterprise?

With more companies embracing bring your own device (BYOD), it's logical to assume there's a need for a secure enterprise texting solution. As Shaun Smith, technology practice director at Xceed Group, noted, that BYOD has its benefits — as long as companies conduct due diligence and weigh those benefits against the possible risks.

Enter ArmorText, a Reston, Va.-based company that's developing a secure messaging client for the enterprise, targeted specifically at those in regulated markets. The company has already raised nearly $2 million in outside funding.

ArmorText is positioning itself as the answer to BYOD security concerns: It claims its products and services will make BYOD the rule in the workplace rather than the exception.

Microsoft Ups Its Productivity Play With New Calendaring App

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It may seem like Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella is talking big sky when he makes bold statements, claiming his company will “reinvent productivity for a new generation,” a generation whose professional and personal lives are spent primarily in mobile apps and in the Cloud.

But if you look at what he’s been able to accomplish since last summer, it’s kind of daunting. Now you can not only access Office and many of its individual components via almost any mobile device, but your experiences with Microsoft’s apps are also on par with the best of what can be found in the App Store or on Google Play.

And if there’s a place where the Redmond, Wash. tech giant falls short, it doesn’t stay that way for very long. Not on Nadella’s watch.

The 2 Irresistible Forces of Enterprise Mobility

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“What happens when an irresistible force meets an immovable object?” I was a teenager when I first heard this question. It was an interesting thought exercise at the time, but the practical application in business is more about two forces that go in different directions. For an example, look no farther than when an IT leader sees things differently than a business leader.

Good Offers New Enterprise Mobility Management Suite

Sunnyvale, Calif.-based Good Technology, a mobile security solutions provider, has launched a new platform that it promises will simplify enterprise mobility management (EMM). Its newly launched Good Management Suite is a cross-platform solution that adds mobile application management, a secure browser and an enterprise-focused application store to its mobile device management (MDM) functionality.

According to Gartner, EMM suites consist of policy and configuration management tools and a management overlay for applications and content intended for mobile devices based on smartphone operating systems. They are an evolution from previous-generation MDM products that lacked application and content management.

Good Technology CMO Lynn Lucas told CMSWire the new platform is a response to market needs. Enterprises need more than a product to manage their mobile devices: They want a platform allows them to manage devices, mobilize content and enable the delivery of mobile applications.

Is Microsoft Investing in a Google Android Competitor?

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Anyone who still thinks that Android is truly open source, move along, there’s nothing here for you.

For those that believe Google has imposed too much control over it, then news that Microsoft may be investing in a small start-up called Cyanogen that is setting itself up as a competitor to Google will probably be welcome.

The Wall Street Journal reported this morning that Microsoft has plans to become a minority investor in Cyanogen, which is building an Android platform that is outside the control of Google and which it defines as open source.

Microsoft Offers New Outlook Apps for iOS, Android

In less than two months, Microsoft has capitalized on technology from its Acompli buy to create new Outlook apps for iOS and Android. Microsoft, which acquired the San Francisco-based provider of mobile email apps for $200 million in early December, boasted today that "Acompli is now Outlook."

Both apps will work with Microsoft products like Office 365, Exchange and Outlook.com as well as Gmail, Yahoo Mail and other services. Acompli is now available on the App Store and Google Play for smartphones and tablets.

According to Microsoft they will replace existing Outlook Web Apps (OWA), although not right away. Microsoft plans to leave the OWA for iPhone/iPad/Android apps on the market until it fully integrates all of their advanced features, which it expects to do by summer.

Leave Your iPad at Home, Forget BYOD, Says HP

Face it, HP notes: iPads, Android and Windows tablets may be great but they weren’t built specifically for business. And the house that Meg Whitman rules may have a valid argument when you consider that the devices are being used by gazillions of kids strapped into shopping carts drawing animals for Night Zookeeper, by teens playing Candy Crush Saga and by moms who have adopted them as digital recipe displays when they cook. Never mind everyone watching Netflix.

Think about it. Do you want to make sales presentations on the device that your kid rests his lollipop on? Or that you and your honey used last night to watch a racy movie? Maybe yes, maybe no, but that’s not the main reason HP thinks that you might want to use different devices at work and at home.

“They (consumer-grade devices) also pose significant challenges to IT departments who have to support their now mobile workforces while keeping corporate data managed and secure,” said Ron Coughlin, senior vice president and general manager, Personal Systems, HP.

4 Trends in Workplace Communication [Infographic]

Flexible hours, the ability to work remotely and more time off will motivate employees to work harder in 2015. But there’s another motivator on this list you might not expect: better communication tools.

This is just one of the findings of a recent survey conducted by uSamp Research on behalf of RingCentral. The results were published in an infographic, Business Communications are “Always On” in 2015.

“What we’re seeing is a change in which people communicate, and how business communication is perceived,” said Kira Makagon, EVP of Innovation for RingCentral. “It has a lot to do with an employee having the freedom to work from anywhere, wanting the freedom to work from anywhere and almost demanding the freedom to work from anywhere.”

What Enterprise Apps Could Learn From Consumer Apps

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Development of mobile apps for consumers and enterprise are two different animals. Consumer apps come from a broad range of sources, from individual hobbyists building Flappy Bird clones to publicly traded kings of the consumer app industry unleashing Candy Crush Sagas upon the workers of the world. For many consumer app creators, the approval process and product cycle is not complicated: make your game or widget, get the bugs fixed, and put it out there for everyone to enjoy. If it’s engaging and you catch viral lightning in a bottle you might see the ROI shortly, from ad impressions or in-app purchases.

Enterprise app development typically includes many more levels of approval, including getting buy-in from an organization’s CTO and other key stakeholders. This can result in more refinement to ensure all the requirements of the enterprise are met, but this comes with the risk that the app could sprawl to become an over-packed, unwieldy platypus.

Building a Digital Workplace with Office 365

Our workday world has changed dramatically with the advent of always on internet access and the explosion of mobile devices in the enterprise. Employees are no longer tethered to their desks in office buildings but are in the field working face to face with clients and customers. Microsoft’s vision for the future of work is made up of the Cloud OS (Office 365) and the mobile devices you use every day to get work done. The intersection between the two is the digital workplace.

A Look Back: Broken Promises of the Mobile Enterprise

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Perhaps nothing in information technology offers a richer mix of expectation and disillusionment than the mobile enterprise. It's become like the lover who keeps promising a long-term relationship but never commits.

Since workers became enamored with smartphones eight years ago, it has seemed obvious those devices will one day connect with the applications and data within the company's fire-walled network. And that will happen. It just didn't happen in 2014.

Mobile devices and the enterprise have yet to form a happy marriage. Despite significant advances this year, hurdles remain before the mobile enterprise can achieve the kind of speed, safety and productivity that office workers have come to expect from their network.

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