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Latest Mobile Enterprise News & Articles

Leave Your iPad at Home, Forget BYOD, Says HP

Face it, HP notes: iPads, Android and Windows tablets may be great but they weren’t built specifically for business. And the house that Meg Whitman rules may have a valid argument when you consider that the devices are being used by gazillions of kids strapped into shopping carts drawing animals for Night Zookeeper, by teens playing Candy Crush Saga and by moms who have adopted them as digital recipe displays when they cook. Never mind everyone watching Netflix.

Think about it. Do you want to make sales presentations on the device that your kid rests his lollipop on? Or that you and your honey used last night to watch a racy movie? Maybe yes, maybe no, but that’s not the main reason HP thinks that you might want to use different devices at work and at home.

“They (consumer-grade devices) also pose significant challenges to IT departments who have to support their now mobile workforces while keeping corporate data managed and secure,” said Ron Coughlin, senior vice president and general manager, Personal Systems, HP.

4 Trends in Workplace Communication [Infographic]

Flexible hours, the ability to work remotely and more time off will motivate employees to work harder in 2015. But there’s another motivator on this list you might not expect: better communication tools.

This is just one of the findings of a recent survey conducted by uSamp Research on behalf of RingCentral. The results were published in an infographic, Business Communications are “Always On” in 2015.

“What we’re seeing is a change in which people communicate, and how business communication is perceived,” said Kira Makagon, EVP of Innovation for RingCentral. “It has a lot to do with an employee having the freedom to work from anywhere, wanting the freedom to work from anywhere and almost demanding the freedom to work from anywhere.”

What Enterprise Apps Could Learn From Consumer Apps

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Development of mobile apps for consumers and enterprise are two different animals. Consumer apps come from a broad range of sources, from individual hobbyists building Flappy Bird clones to publicly traded kings of the consumer app industry unleashing Candy Crush Sagas upon the workers of the world. For many consumer app creators, the approval process and product cycle is not complicated: make your game or widget, get the bugs fixed, and put it out there for everyone to enjoy. If it’s engaging and you catch viral lightning in a bottle you might see the ROI shortly, from ad impressions or in-app purchases.

Enterprise app development typically includes many more levels of approval, including getting buy-in from an organization’s CTO and other key stakeholders. This can result in more refinement to ensure all the requirements of the enterprise are met, but this comes with the risk that the app could sprawl to become an over-packed, unwieldy platypus.

Building a Digital Workplace with Office 365

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Our workday world has changed dramatically with the advent of always on internet access and the explosion of mobile devices in the enterprise. Employees are no longer tethered to their desks in office buildings but are in the field working face to face with clients and customers. Microsoft’s vision for the future of work is made up of the Cloud OS (Office 365) and the mobile devices you use every day to get work done. The intersection between the two is the digital workplace.

A Look Back: Broken Promises of the Mobile Enterprise

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Perhaps nothing in information technology offers a richer mix of expectation and disillusionment than the mobile enterprise. It's become like the lover who keeps promising a long-term relationship but never commits.

Since workers became enamored with smartphones eight years ago, it has seemed obvious those devices will one day connect with the applications and data within the company's fire-walled network. And that will happen. It just didn't happen in 2014.

Mobile devices and the enterprise have yet to form a happy marriage. Despite significant advances this year, hurdles remain before the mobile enterprise can achieve the kind of speed, safety and productivity that office workers have come to expect from their network.

CMSWire Top Contributors 2014 - Hyoun Park

2014-22-December-Hyoun-Park.jpgHyoun Park is a prolific tweeter — and much more: A Boston University MBA-trained marketer, a trained social scientist with experience in cross-cultural gender studies and an industry analyst covering social technologies, mobility and enterprise communications. Did we mention he has experience with Moneyball — the analytic quest for success in baseball — as well as other kinds of predictive analytics? We'll make a prediction of our own: You'll enjoy all of Hyoun's posts on CMSWire in 2015.

What's Hot and What's Not in Enterprise Mobility Trends

2014-22-December-Cell-Phone-Ski.jpgMobility has been a hot topic in the enterprise space for nearly two decades, but the times have changed since the world was dominated by Blackberry and Palm. The enterprise mobility space is now a robust, highly specialized, and rapidly responsive environment where even Microsoft allows users to edit Office files on third-party mobile applications.

Why? User experience, integration and productivity rule the market. And for IT administrators, understanding the trends that drive this ever-changing marketplace is crucial.

Apple, IBM Mega Deal Reveals First Offering

2014-10-December-The-Reveal.jpgIBM's 2014 has been all about partnering with consumer giants.

On the heels of its summer mega deal with Apple, enterprise software and hardware giant IBM struck a partnership with Twitter.

Today, IBM unveiled the first offering from that Apple deal — IBM MobileFirst for iOS solutions. IBM's apps and cloud services mesh IBM’s big data and analytics capabilities to iPhone and iPad users in the enterprise. 

In reality, these IBM deals are enterprise-targeted, but the foundation is business giant meets consumer giant.

International Consumer Machines? ICM? Not quite, but in a year where IBM could use a boost, they're definitely turning to their consumer friends to boost their enterprise big data and analytics offerings. 

TigerText Expands Its Secure Texting for the Enterprise

2014-09-December-BradBrooks-quote.jpgLike it or not, your coworkers probably share sensitive corporate information in texts. For them, it's a matter of convenience that helps them to collaborate with coworkers. For many businesses, that represents a nightmarish brew of security concerns, compliance violations, data loss and policy breaches.

Today, TigerText expanded its enterprise-grade texting service, hoping to add to the 5,000 healthcare facilities that already use its secure cloud-based network. The five-year-old company also has its eye on expansion into the financial services and government sectors, which face comparable challenges in controlling the information shared by workers.

If IT leaders have learned nothing else during the BYOD era, they learned that resistance is futile. Workers will use their own smartphones at work and the best strategy is to help them to do so safely. In healthcare, for example, doctors and other caregivers form shadow networks to share updates on patient status and other factors, often in violation of government privacy regulations and employer information governance policies.

How a Mobile Social Network Connected a Start-Up's Employees

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Do enterprise social networks (ESNs) have the ability to influence or change company culture or identity? They do, although the experience will vary dramatically from organization to organization, and may be quite subtle or slow.

Where Enterprise Mobile Fits in the Digital Workplace

“Let’s just make the intranet accessible on mobile devices. It looks fine on my smartphone, I just have to zoom in a little.”

Nope. No, no, no. That is not a good enterprise mobile strategy. It misunderstands the role of mobile devices in employees’ work lives and the transformative power of well-designed mobile tools.

For those looking to develop strategic, integrated digital workplaces that deliver high business value, understanding the role of mobile devices is critical.

Did Microsoft Buy Acompli?

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UPDATE: It’s now official. Acompli confirms Microsoft has acquired it. Sources say that it sold for around $200 million, though no one we have approached is willing to go on record with a number. While we’re waiting for Microsoft to spell out its reasoning for making the purchase, it’s safe to assume that it’s yet another step up CEO Satya Nadella’s ladder to a mobile first, cloud first world.

Not just that, but it also gives the enterprise yet another reason to move to and stick with the Office 365 platform, with which Acompli is already integrated. It also offers “amazing” support for email and file services from Apple, Dropbox, Google and Box, the company boasts.

In a blog post, Acompli co-founder and CEO Javier Soltero explains that his team sought to create a mobile e-mail product for enterprises that is “Loved by users and trusted  for IT," which is pretty much what every enterprise collaboration vendor promises to do. But based on our quick look at the solution, it has hit the mark and is destined to keep raising the stakes with Microsoft’s ample resources to fuel its growth.

Current Accompli users should note that, according to Soltero, their “app and accounts will continue to work and the team will continue on our fast pace of improving and adding new functionality every couple of weeks.”

Google for Work Puts Security in the Hands of Employees

Microsoft may be making a lot of noise about additional security features in Office 365, but Google has been working away behind the scenes too, if perhaps in a less vocal way. Yesterday, it launched the Devices and Activity dashboard, which monitors Google accounts on enterprise devices.

The new dashboard provides IT administrators a way of monitoring who has been accessing what accounts, where and why, but adds an underlying current to the security discussion that's becoming increasingly important in enterprises: responsibility.

IBM Aims to Ease Mobile Enterprise Management

2014-25-November-IBM Mobile.jpgPity the chief information officer, who has faced waves of new challenges over the past few years as the mobile enterprise gained steam.

First, workers brought their own devices to work and demanded network access. Then mobile workers wanted remote access to business apps across all brands of tablets and phones. And all the while concerns about budgets, security and administration grew nearly as fast as the number of users.

It's not over. Juniper Research predicts that there will be 1 billion worker-owned smartphones and tablets connected to enterprises by 2018. Getting an upper hand on this means finding ways to monitor adoption rates, improve the worker experience, keep a tight lid on security and do it all within budget. 

How to Tame Your Mobile Security Dragon

It's complicated. It's expensive and we don’t have the budget for it. There are no unifying standards. The apps are complex. Did we say it was complicated?

These are some of the reasons why a lot of companies do not secure the enterprise's mobile operations are fully — or even at all — as they should. (You can find the complete list in Part 1.

There is a measure of truth in these reasons but still not shoring up the mobile piece of the enterprise promises nothing but trouble.

Is Word for iPad Ready for Prime Time?

Conventional wisdom says that the average user uses only 10 percent of a software product, however each user tends to use a different 10 percent. To accommodate many different types of users, software packages incorporate a zillion features that require insane amounts of memory. On the PC with hundreds of GB of storage this is acceptable, but can it carry over to mobile devices like the iPad?

5 Reasons IT Is Scared of Mobile Security

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Last month Spiceworks released a study about mobile security in the enterprise – or, as the case may be, lack thereof.

The company found that despite ever-present threat of hacks into corporate systems, corporate IT shops are not investing in mobile device management software or buying mobile device security software, at least not at the levels they should given the deep inroads mobile devices have made in the corporate environment.

Spiceworks found that very few IT departments are monitoring employee usage of their mobile device and in fact, more than 25 percent of the organizations of the IT executives surveyed do not have a formal mobile device policy in place.

It's scary information when you consider that 96 percent of supported smartphone and tablets do have access to corporate data, Spiceworks' Peter Tsai told CMSWire.com. "I would say that there is very likely a lot of vulnerable data out there."

IT ops, though, are not run by stupid people—they know the risks they are taking, Tsai continues.

Office 365 Strengthens Mobile Device Management #TEE14

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Cloud first, mobile first. Remember that one? If you don’t, let us remind you that it’s the new Microsoft mantra that was chanted first by Satya Nadella on his first public outing as the company's new CEO.

Earlier this week at TechEd Europe, Microsoft talked a lot about securing social business in the cloud through Data Loss Prevention (DLP). Yesterday it talked about managing mobile data.

But this wasn’t just about managing mobile data and devices in a general sense, with a doff of the hat to Microsoft’s work on Windows Phone. This was about managing mobile devices and data specifically for Office 365.

Developers, IT Decision Makers Worlds Apart on Mobile

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Developers and senior IT decision makers have differing views of mobile maturity and its development in their organizations. That's not surprising.

But this much difference?

Appcelerator, a mobile enterprise platform provider, and IDC recently surveyed 8,010 mobile developers and 121 IT decision makers. They found vastly differing opinions on where mobile is and where it's going.

"Same planet, different world," Brad Hipps, Appcelerator's vice president of marketing, told CMSWire. "They really have diametrically opposed views of what's happening."

Connecting Workers to Information in the Digital Workplace

2014-27-October-Information-Booth.jpgTwo billion jobs will be lost by 2030 … and that’s a good thing?

So says Paul Miller, author of the newly released book "The Digital Renaissance of Work: Delivering Digital Workplace Fit for the Future." Miller is quick to point out those lost jobs are menial, routine jobs which will be eliminated through automation technology. At the same time, new, more satisfying jobs will replace the lost ones.

This is no far-off prediction. According to Gartner Research, 60 percent of today’s US jobs are non-routine, up from 40 percent in 1975. And automation of routine work is already changing the nature of how "stuff" gets done. For example, in the 2012 book "Race Against the Machine," MIT professors Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee show how the automation of transportation provided by driverless cars will soon eliminate 4.5 million jobs.

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