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Latest Mobile Enterprise News & Articles

Apple, IBM Mega Deal Reveals First Offering

2014-10-December-The-Reveal.jpgIBM's 2014 has been all about partnering with consumer giants.

On the heels of its summer mega deal with Apple, enterprise software and hardware giant IBM struck a partnership with Twitter.

Today, IBM unveiled the first offering from that Apple deal — IBM MobileFirst for iOS solutions. IBM's apps and cloud services mesh IBM’s big data and analytics capabilities to iPhone and iPad users in the enterprise. 

In reality, these IBM deals are enterprise-targeted, but the foundation is business giant meets consumer giant.

International Consumer Machines? ICM? Not quite, but in a year where IBM could use a boost, they're definitely turning to their consumer friends to boost their enterprise big data and analytics offerings. 

TigerText Expands Its Secure Texting for the Enterprise

2014-09-December-BradBrooks-quote.jpgLike it or not, your coworkers probably share sensitive corporate information in texts. For them, it's a matter of convenience that helps them to collaborate with coworkers. For many businesses, that represents a nightmarish brew of security concerns, compliance violations, data loss and policy breaches.

Today, TigerText expanded its enterprise-grade texting service, hoping to add to the 5,000 healthcare facilities that already use its secure cloud-based network. The five-year-old company also has its eye on expansion into the financial services and government sectors, which face comparable challenges in controlling the information shared by workers.

If IT leaders have learned nothing else during the BYOD era, they learned that resistance is futile. Workers will use their own smartphones at work and the best strategy is to help them to do so safely. In healthcare, for example, doctors and other caregivers form shadow networks to share updates on patient status and other factors, often in violation of government privacy regulations and employer information governance policies.

How a Mobile Social Network Connected a Start-Up's Employees

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Do enterprise social networks (ESNs) have the ability to influence or change company culture or identity? They do, although the experience will vary dramatically from organization to organization, and may be quite subtle or slow.

Where Enterprise Mobile Fits in the Digital Workplace

2014-02-December-Texting-Riding.jpg“Let’s just make the intranet accessible on mobile devices. It looks fine on my smartphone, I just have to zoom in a little.”

Nope. No, no, no. That is not a good enterprise mobile strategy. It misunderstands the role of mobile devices in employees’ work lives and the transformative power of well-designed mobile tools.

For those looking to develop strategic, integrated digital workplaces that deliver high business value, understanding the role of mobile devices is critical.

Did Microsoft Buy Acompli?

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UPDATE: It’s now official. Acompli confirms Microsoft has acquired it. Sources say that it sold for around $200 million, though no one we have approached is willing to go on record with a number. While we’re waiting for Microsoft to spell out its reasoning for making the purchase, it’s safe to assume that it’s yet another step up CEO Satya Nadella’s ladder to a mobile first, cloud first world.

Not just that, but it also gives the enterprise yet another reason to move to and stick with the Office 365 platform, with which Acompli is already integrated. It also offers “amazing” support for email and file services from Apple, Dropbox, Google and Box, the company boasts.

In a blog post, Acompli co-founder and CEO Javier Soltero explains that his team sought to create a mobile e-mail product for enterprises that is “Loved by users and trusted  for IT," which is pretty much what every enterprise collaboration vendor promises to do. But based on our quick look at the solution, it has hit the mark and is destined to keep raising the stakes with Microsoft’s ample resources to fuel its growth.

Current Accompli users should note that, according to Soltero, their “app and accounts will continue to work and the team will continue on our fast pace of improving and adding new functionality every couple of weeks.”

Google for Work Puts Security in the Hands of Employees

Microsoft may be making a lot of noise about additional security features in Office 365, but Google has been working away behind the scenes too, if perhaps in a less vocal way. Yesterday, it launched the Devices and Activity dashboard, which monitors Google accounts on enterprise devices.

The new dashboard provides IT administrators a way of monitoring who has been accessing what accounts, where and why, but adds an underlying current to the security discussion that's becoming increasingly important in enterprises: responsibility.

IBM Aims to Ease Mobile Enterprise Management

2014-25-November-IBM Mobile.jpgPity the chief information officer, who has faced waves of new challenges over the past few years as the mobile enterprise gained steam.

First, workers brought their own devices to work and demanded network access. Then mobile workers wanted remote access to business apps across all brands of tablets and phones. And all the while concerns about budgets, security and administration grew nearly as fast as the number of users.

It's not over. Juniper Research predicts that there will be 1 billion worker-owned smartphones and tablets connected to enterprises by 2018. Getting an upper hand on this means finding ways to monitor adoption rates, improve the worker experience, keep a tight lid on security and do it all within budget. 

How to Tame Your Mobile Security Dragon

It's complicated. It's expensive and we don’t have the budget for it. There are no unifying standards. The apps are complex. Did we say it was complicated?

These are some of the reasons why a lot of companies do not secure the enterprise's mobile operations are fully — or even at all — as they should. (You can find the complete list in Part 1.

There is a measure of truth in these reasons but still not shoring up the mobile piece of the enterprise promises nothing but trouble.

Is Word for iPad Ready for Prime Time?

2014-20-November-Work-iPad.jpgConventional wisdom says that the average user uses only 10 percent of a software product, however each user tends to use a different 10 percent. To accommodate many different types of users, software packages incorporate a zillion features that require insane amounts of memory. On the PC with hundreds of GB of storage this is acceptable, but can it carry over to mobile devices like the iPad?

5 Reasons IT Is Scared of Mobile Security

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Last month Spiceworks released a study about mobile security in the enterprise – or, as the case may be, lack thereof.

The company found that despite ever-present threat of hacks into corporate systems, corporate IT shops are not investing in mobile device management software or buying mobile device security software, at least not at the levels they should given the deep inroads mobile devices have made in the corporate environment.

Spiceworks found that very few IT departments are monitoring employee usage of their mobile device and in fact, more than 25 percent of the organizations of the IT executives surveyed do not have a formal mobile device policy in place.

It's scary information when you consider that 96 percent of supported smartphone and tablets do have access to corporate data, Spiceworks' Peter Tsai told CMSWire.com. "I would say that there is very likely a lot of vulnerable data out there."

IT ops, though, are not run by stupid people—they know the risks they are taking, Tsai continues.

Office 365 Strengthens Mobile Device Management #TEE14

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Cloud first, mobile first. Remember that one? If you don’t, let us remind you that it’s the new Microsoft mantra that was chanted first by Satya Nadella on his first public outing as the company's new CEO.

Earlier this week at TechEd Europe, Microsoft talked a lot about securing social business in the cloud through Data Loss Prevention (DLP). Yesterday it talked about managing mobile data.

But this wasn’t just about managing mobile data and devices in a general sense, with a doff of the hat to Microsoft’s work on Windows Phone. This was about managing mobile devices and data specifically for Office 365.

Developers, IT Decision Makers Worlds Apart on Mobile

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Developers and senior IT decision makers have differing views of mobile maturity and its development in their organizations. That's not surprising.

But this much difference?

Appcelerator, a mobile enterprise platform provider, and IDC recently surveyed 8,010 mobile developers and 121 IT decision makers. They found vastly differing opinions on where mobile is and where it's going.

"Same planet, different world," Brad Hipps, Appcelerator's vice president of marketing, told CMSWire. "They really have diametrically opposed views of what's happening."

Connecting Workers to Information in the Digital Workplace

2014-27-October-Information-Booth.jpgTwo billion jobs will be lost by 2030 … and that’s a good thing?

So says Paul Miller, author of the newly released book "The Digital Renaissance of Work: Delivering Digital Workplace Fit for the Future." Miller is quick to point out those lost jobs are menial, routine jobs which will be eliminated through automation technology. At the same time, new, more satisfying jobs will replace the lost ones.

This is no far-off prediction. According to Gartner Research, 60 percent of today’s US jobs are non-routine, up from 40 percent in 1975. And automation of routine work is already changing the nature of how "stuff" gets done. For example, in the 2012 book "Race Against the Machine," MIT professors Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee show how the automation of transportation provided by driverless cars will soon eliminate 4.5 million jobs.

Here's What Happens When Employees BYOD

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Security-related headaches around BYOD may make users want to BYOB.

That's what you can conclude from a new survey that shows organizations with bring your own device (BYOD) policies have twice the number of security concerns as other organizations.

“BYOD introduces a variety of potential risks from security and policy perspectives, as well as end-user privacy,” said Eugene Liderman, director of the office of the CTO at Good Technology, the company that sponsored the Mid-Market Mobility Trends Survey.

What You Should Know About Mobile Content Creation

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Until recently there was a clear divide in the enterprise between mobile devices and less portable computers, like laptops and desktops. The former was used primarily to consume content, while the latter was used to create content.

But those lines are blurring at a surprisingly rapid pace, according to a new report by bigtincan. In its biannual survey on tech trends, the company found there was a 37 percent increase year-over-year in content creation on mobile devices like smartphones and tablets. (While laptops are, strictly speaking, also considered mobile tools, they were specifically lumped in with desktops in this survey).

In the simplest terms, that means more workers are using smartphones and tablets — their own or company-provided — to create work emails and documents as well as view them. There are a number of factors behind this trend, said David Keane, bigtincan founder and CEO.

The Metamorphosis of the Social Enterprise

2014-26-September-Change.jpgThe Social Enterprise is dead … but it hasn’t disappeared. Rather, it has been replaced by a remarkably similar concept: the Digital Workplace. According to Gartner, the Digital Workplace "enables new and more effective ways of working, improves employee engagement and agility, and exploits consumer-oriented styles and technologies."

Lost Your Phone? You're Probably a Guy [Infographic]

2014-25-September-battle-of-the-sexes.jpgIn the spirit of everything politically incorrect, let's talk about the superiority of women over men. OK, that's a stretch.

Let's talk about the documented, somewhat scientific finding that men can be much more irresponsible than women when it comes to losing their electronic devices.

That's the conclusion from TeamViewer, a provider of remote control and online meetings software. The company just announced the findings of its airbackup Employee Behavioral Study, which examined the behavior and attitudes of American office workers and how they affect on-the-job data loss.

Based on a sponsored Harris Poll of more than 2,000 American adults last month, men just can't keep their phones in their pockets.

Nearly half of employed men (46 percent) admit to being likely to lose the electronic device they use for work and all the important company files on it, compared to only 27 percent of employed women. And young men are the worst — with a whopping 60 percent of men ages 18 to 34 years-old owning up to likely device loss, compared to 30 percent of women in the same age group.

GSMA Predicts 2B M2M Connections by 2020 #Mobile360

ATLANTA — Brace yourself for an onslaught of machine-to-machine (M2M) connections.

GSMA, a global mobile industry trade association, predicts there could be as many as 2 billion M2M connections by 2020 — double the current forecast. The estimate was included in a report released this week in conjunction with GSMA's Mobile 360 North America conference here.

M2M, an integral part of the Internet of Things (IoT), describes the use of applications enabled by communication between two or more machines. The GSMA study only counts M2M connections that access mobile networks (cellular M2M) and excludes consumer devices such as smartphones and tablets.

Currently, approximately 468 mobile operators offer M2M services across 190 countries, accounting for about three percent of global mobile connections. GSMA expects M2M will account for at least 10 percent of the global mobile market by 2020 under desirable market conditions.

GSMA Focuses on Connected Living in Atlanta #Mobile360

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ATLANTA  —  GSMA, an association of mobile operators best known for its massive annual Mobile World Congress trade show in Spain, opted for a more intimate setting this week. 

Rather that the  85,000 mobile industry stakeholders it attracts in Barcelona, the inaugural Mobile 360 North America conference here lured less than 300 attendees.The two-day event kicked off yesterday at the W Hotel in the Midtown section of the city.

Attendees included heavy-hitters in the mobile industry, include C-level executives from the likes of AT&T, Verizon, ZTE and Ericsson.

The theme of the conference, “Driving Innovation in Connected Living.” It was held to address the growing mobile ecosystem in North America — the world’s largest broadband market, as well as what we can expect in years ahead.

A Look at the Top of Gartner's Mobile App Development World

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Customers want mobile apps. And providers are answering.

Gartner has chosen the providers it feels are best at enabling IT developers to create mobile applications for customers, partners and employees. It announced them in its Magic Quadrant for Mobile Application Development Platforms released this month.

It tabbed SAP, IBM, Kony, Adobe, Appcelerator and Pegasystems as the leaders in the space, followed by "challengers" Salesforce and MicroStrategy.

The "niche players" field is large: Apple, Microsoft, Google, Oracle, DSI, Motorola Solutions, Embarcadero, Verivo Software and ClickSoftware. Gartner also named Xamarin, Terelik and Sencha as "visionaries."

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