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Latest Mobile Enterprise News & Articles

Office 365 Strengthens Mobile Device Management #TEE14

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Cloud first, mobile first. Remember that one? If you don’t, let us remind you that it’s the new Microsoft mantra that was chanted first by Satya Nadella on his first public outing as the company's new CEO.

Earlier this week at TechEd Europe, Microsoft talked a lot about securing social business in the cloud through Data Loss Prevention (DLP). Yesterday it talked about managing mobile data.

But this wasn’t just about managing mobile data and devices in a general sense, with a doff of the hat to Microsoft’s work on Windows Phone. This was about managing mobile devices and data specifically for Office 365.

Developers, IT Decision Makers Worlds Apart on Mobile

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Developers and senior IT decision makers have differing views of mobile maturity and its development in their organizations. That's not surprising.

But this much difference?

Appcelerator, a mobile enterprise platform provider, and IDC recently surveyed 8,010 mobile developers and 121 IT decision makers. They found vastly differing opinions on where mobile is and where it's going.

"Same planet, different world," Brad Hipps, Appcelerator's vice president of marketing, told CMSWire. "They really have diametrically opposed views of what's happening."

Connecting Workers to Information in the Digital Workplace

2014-27-October-Information-Booth.jpgTwo billion jobs will be lost by 2030 … and that’s a good thing?

So says Paul Miller, author of the newly released book "The Digital Renaissance of Work: Delivering Digital Workplace Fit for the Future." Miller is quick to point out those lost jobs are menial, routine jobs which will be eliminated through automation technology. At the same time, new, more satisfying jobs will replace the lost ones.

This is no far-off prediction. According to Gartner Research, 60 percent of today’s US jobs are non-routine, up from 40 percent in 1975. And automation of routine work is already changing the nature of how "stuff" gets done. For example, in the 2012 book "Race Against the Machine," MIT professors Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee show how the automation of transportation provided by driverless cars will soon eliminate 4.5 million jobs.

Here's What Happens When Employees BYOD

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Security-related headaches around BYOD may make users want to BYOB.

That's what you can conclude from a new survey that shows organizations with bring your own device (BYOD) policies have twice the number of security concerns as other organizations.

“BYOD introduces a variety of potential risks from security and policy perspectives, as well as end-user privacy,” said Eugene Liderman, director of the office of the CTO at Good Technology, the company that sponsored the Mid-Market Mobility Trends Survey.

What You Should Know About Mobile Content Creation

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Until recently there was a clear divide in the enterprise between mobile devices and less portable computers, like laptops and desktops. The former was used primarily to consume content, while the latter was used to create content.

But those lines are blurring at a surprisingly rapid pace, according to a new report by bigtincan. In its biannual survey on tech trends, the company found there was a 37 percent increase year-over-year in content creation on mobile devices like smartphones and tablets. (While laptops are, strictly speaking, also considered mobile tools, they were specifically lumped in with desktops in this survey).

In the simplest terms, that means more workers are using smartphones and tablets — their own or company-provided — to create work emails and documents as well as view them. There are a number of factors behind this trend, said David Keane, bigtincan founder and CEO.

The Metamorphosis of the Social Enterprise

2014-26-September-Change.jpgThe Social Enterprise is dead … but it hasn’t disappeared. Rather, it has been replaced by a remarkably similar concept: the Digital Workplace. According to Gartner, the Digital Workplace "enables new and more effective ways of working, improves employee engagement and agility, and exploits consumer-oriented styles and technologies."

Lost Your Phone? You're Probably a Guy [Infographic]

2014-25-September-battle-of-the-sexes.jpgIn the spirit of everything politically incorrect, let's talk about the superiority of women over men. OK, that's a stretch.

Let's talk about the documented, somewhat scientific finding that men can be much more irresponsible than women when it comes to losing their electronic devices.

That's the conclusion from TeamViewer, a provider of remote control and online meetings software. The company just announced the findings of its airbackup Employee Behavioral Study, which examined the behavior and attitudes of American office workers and how they affect on-the-job data loss.

Based on a sponsored Harris Poll of more than 2,000 American adults last month, men just can't keep their phones in their pockets.

Nearly half of employed men (46 percent) admit to being likely to lose the electronic device they use for work and all the important company files on it, compared to only 27 percent of employed women. And young men are the worst — with a whopping 60 percent of men ages 18 to 34 years-old owning up to likely device loss, compared to 30 percent of women in the same age group.

GSMA Predicts 2B M2M Connections by 2020 #Mobile360

ATLANTA — Brace yourself for an onslaught of machine-to-machine (M2M) connections.

GSMA, a global mobile industry trade association, predicts there could be as many as 2 billion M2M connections by 2020 — double the current forecast. The estimate was included in a report released this week in conjunction with GSMA's Mobile 360 North America conference here.

M2M, an integral part of the Internet of Things (IoT), describes the use of applications enabled by communication between two or more machines. The GSMA study only counts M2M connections that access mobile networks (cellular M2M) and excludes consumer devices such as smartphones and tablets.

Currently, approximately 468 mobile operators offer M2M services across 190 countries, accounting for about three percent of global mobile connections. GSMA expects M2M will account for at least 10 percent of the global mobile market by 2020 under desirable market conditions.

GSMA Focuses on Connected Living in Atlanta #Mobile360

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ATLANTA  —  GSMA, an association of mobile operators best known for its massive annual Mobile World Congress trade show in Spain, opted for a more intimate setting this week. 

Rather that the  85,000 mobile industry stakeholders it attracts in Barcelona, the inaugural Mobile 360 North America conference here lured less than 300 attendees.The two-day event kicked off yesterday at the W Hotel in the Midtown section of the city.

Attendees included heavy-hitters in the mobile industry, include C-level executives from the likes of AT&T, Verizon, ZTE and Ericsson.

The theme of the conference, “Driving Innovation in Connected Living.” It was held to address the growing mobile ecosystem in North America — the world’s largest broadband market, as well as what we can expect in years ahead.

A Look at the Top of Gartner's Mobile App Development World

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Customers want mobile apps. And providers are answering.

Gartner has chosen the providers it feels are best at enabling IT developers to create mobile applications for customers, partners and employees. It announced them in its Magic Quadrant for Mobile Application Development Platforms released this month.

It tabbed SAP, IBM, Kony, Adobe, Appcelerator and Pegasystems as the leaders in the space, followed by "challengers" Salesforce and MicroStrategy.

The "niche players" field is large: Apple, Microsoft, Google, Oracle, DSI, Motorola Solutions, Embarcadero, Verivo Software and ClickSoftware. Gartner also named Xamarin, Terelik and Sencha as "visionaries."

Why Dell Just Unveiled the Dell Business Phone

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It’s not April and this isn’t a joke. Dell introduced the Dell Business Phone just minutes ago.

It’s interesting news to begin with, but the fact that it comes on the same day that VMWare’s AirWatch makes its Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) and Enterprise File Sync and Share (EFSS) announcements, at its annual user conference, makes it even more so.

Never mind the fact that Apple is expected to be unveiling its new iPhones later today. We doubt that those will have an immediate enterprise twist, especially because the IBM + Apple news around mobility in the enterprise was made last July.

Is Dell’s timing a coincidence? We think so. It’s hard to imagine why it would want to risk its vitally important news to get lost in the crowd. So what card is it playing?

What Apple is Cooking Up: iPhone 6 and iWatch Rumors

Only Apple could get away with it.

Thirty years after Steve Jobs unveiled the first Macintosh at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts in Cupertino, Calif., Apple is back home. Tomorrow it's expected to launch the iPhone 6, and possibly even unveil its latest entry into the Internet of Things, a wearable computer called the iWatch. 

As usual, the invitation to the two-hour media event that starts at 10 am PDT (1 pm EDT) tomorrow sheds little light on what will happen. But speculation about the iWatch was fueled by the fact that Apple extended invitations to top fashion editors and bloggers.

The invitation simply states, “Wish we could say more."

Pivotal Leads the Charge into the Enterprise Mobile App Era

2014-20-August-Bull-Charge.jpgThe canned software era is over and the custom mobile app era is here. We know, it sounds like a bunch of marketing jive, but in reality, it’s pretty deep. Tomorrow’s enterprise applications will be mobile apps.

Think about your most common gateway to the web right now — it’s probably not your PC. How many times a day do you use your phone for things other than making calls? And your tablet? We’d bet that you’re visiting apps a lot more often than you’re typing in URLs.

With the onset of the consumerization of IT, what you do in your personal life first, moves to the enterprise. It’s only a matter of time before the way you interact with where you do business, your workplace and its business partners will be via mobile apps too.

Gartner Names 7 'Hype Cycle' Technologies

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Driving your organization down the road to digital business? If you are, Gartner has identified seven emerging and established technologies that may help assure a smoother journey.

The recently published 2014 Gartner Hype Cycle Special Report identifies them as: Internet of Things and operational technologies, mobile infrastructure, enterprise mobility management (EMM), analytics, big data, social and cloud. But don’t get too hooked on these goodies, because there are more technologies just starting to emerge.

The report is the result of an evolution of over 2000 technologies, services and trends in 119 different areas over the past year.

As Technology Needs Rise, So Does Security

The workplace is no longer limited to a seat behind a desk, and technology trends continue to evolve to meet the demands of roving offices. Companies want easy efficient business technology, but they also want security.

This is evidenced by a significant second quarter rise in mobile customer relationship management (CRM), Business Intelligence (BI) and document editing apps and secure instant messaging apps in the Good Technology Mobility Index report for Q2 2014.

The second-quarter analysis by the mobile security solutions provider analyzes enterprise apps and data usage for more than 5,000 companies in over 180 countries and is published every quarter.

“Enterprises are realizing the need for secure mobile apps and mobile business process workflows,” Lynn Lucas, chief marketing officer at Good Technology, told CMSWire. “Two years ago, the lion share of the industry discussion was around device choice and email. Today that focus is shifting to technology that allows employees to work efficiently whether they’re onsite or off.”

A Vision of Wearable Tech in the Workplace

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Wearable tech has been hot this year, with a lot of companies emerging as players in the wearable space. Everything from activity monitors to wearable cameras to smart watches have popped into the Internet of Things (IoT) market, some making more impact than others. And while the implications on the consumer market are clear, the enterprise market remains wide open and ripe for disruption.

There are some obvious use cases for wearables in the workplace like employee monitoring, health and safety monitoring, and access control. Hitachi, for example, has already introduced what looks like an elaborate employee ID badge embedded with sensors that track who employees talk to — as well as where and how actively. "A manager can monitor who speaks up at meetings and who spends more time at the coffee machine than their desk," Forbes reported this week.

More devices like Hitachi's will come along at their own pace and not really change the way businesses run.

The area that I expect wearables to have the largest impact and disruptive force is in helping to manage and augment our everyday interactions with both people and things.

The Mobile Enterprise Exists, But Successes Are Few and Far Between

Mobile Enterprise, 2014-24-July-Marbles.jpgThe mobile enterprise has some roadblocks standing in the way from moving from an ideal to a reality. I recently wrote about how a lack of enterprise mobile apps will prolong the realization of the anytime, anywhere workplace. But the dearth of apps is only one reason for the delay. Another reason is a lack of clearly defined business use cases for mobile devices. Organizations are sailing in uncharted mobile enterprise waters today, with few proven successes to emulate.

The bulk of use cases that have surfaced emphasize generic mobile device capabilities, but do not demonstrate clear return on investment (ROI). Some examples include enabling executives to access documents or videoconference with colleagues when away from their desks, and enabling mobile employees to "connect" from coffee shops or from home.

Apple's IBM Play Isn't Only About Selling More iDevices

Apple wants a seat at the enterprise table and IBM will soon be rolling out the red carpet that leads to the boardroom. Sure, Big Blue’s CEO Ginni Rommety might have to help Apple Chief Tim Cook tie his tie and polish his shoes first, but it’s a fair trade.  He might have to tell her the difference between an application and an app. Other than a few small hurdles like those, the earliest days of the IBM and Apple relationship should run smooth.

After all, without needing to sacrifice turf, Rommety’s 103-year-old monolith could be perceived to be cool and forward thinking again. Not only to the old guard that holds IBM Research, with its track record of pushing the boundaries of science, technology and business to make the world work better place, in high regard, but also to the fast tracked execs of the digital generation who have tremendous respect for old guys who get it.

Yes, for IBM the Apple partnership has the potential of doing what Watson hasn’t been able to do —namely making it relevant to Gen Y and the millennials.

Not only that, but Rommety’s slowly sinking ship will be buoyed by consulting fees earned through helping enterprises roll out Mobile in a safe and compliant way.

Thank You, Apple-IBM? Why Mega Deal is Good for Microsoft

mobile enterprise, Thank You, Apple-IBM? Why Mega Deal is Good for MicrosoftApple and IBM announce a mega deal that changes the mobile enterprise as we know it — during the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference.

Microsoft lays off 18,000 the same week at its conference, about 14 percent of its workforce.

And there's actually a silver lining for Microsoft?

Yes, says Richard Edwards, principal analyst for Enterprise IT at London-based Ovum Research.

"It’s no coincidence that the announcement came as Microsoft was holding its Worldwide Partner Conference," Edwards told CMSWire, "but I actually think the IBM/Apple hook-up will benefit Microsoft in the long run."

Good Bet or Huge Gamble? Microsoft's Vision for the Future

2014-17-July-Nadella-Speech.jpgSure the Apple IBM partnership is a big deal, but it may not impact your work and your life as much as the vision that Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella unveiled at the company’s Worldwide Partners Conference (WPC) yesterday.

You might not have heard much about it, but that’s not because it’s not worthwhile or important — it’s just that tech news is generally aimed at enterprises, businesses and consumers, not partners (namely, other software companies, systems integrators, product vendors, consulting firms and so on).

But, if you want to know what the future looks like, partners’ conferences are exactly where you get a sneak peek. After all, this is where tech evangelists learn their scripts and where solution providers receive introductions to the kinds of thinking and training they’ll needs to deliver on those promises.