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Latest Mobile Enterprise News & Articles

Apple's IBM Play Isn't Only About Selling More iDevices

Apple wants a seat at the enterprise table and IBM will soon be rolling out the red carpet that leads to the boardroom. Sure, Big Blue’s CEO Ginni Rommety might have to help Apple Chief Tim Cook tie his tie and polish his shoes first, but it’s a fair trade.  He might have to tell her the difference between an application and an app. Other than a few small hurdles like those, the earliest days of the IBM and Apple relationship should run smooth.

After all, without needing to sacrifice turf, Rommety’s 103-year-old monolith could be perceived to be cool and forward thinking again. Not only to the old guard that holds IBM Research, with its track record of pushing the boundaries of science, technology and business to make the world work better place, in high regard, but also to the fast tracked execs of the digital generation who have tremendous respect for old guys who get it.

Yes, for IBM the Apple partnership has the potential of doing what Watson hasn’t been able to do —namely making it relevant to Gen Y and the millennials.

Not only that, but Rommety’s slowly sinking ship will be buoyed by consulting fees earned through helping enterprises roll out Mobile in a safe and compliant way.

Thank You, Apple-IBM? Why Mega Deal is Good for Microsoft

mobile enterprise, Thank You, Apple-IBM? Why Mega Deal is Good for MicrosoftApple and IBM announce a mega deal that changes the mobile enterprise as we know it — during the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference.

Microsoft lays off 18,000 the same week at its conference, about 14 percent of its workforce.

And there's actually a silver lining for Microsoft?

Yes, says Richard Edwards, principal analyst for Enterprise IT at London-based Ovum Research.

"It’s no coincidence that the announcement came as Microsoft was holding its Worldwide Partner Conference," Edwards told CMSWire, "but I actually think the IBM/Apple hook-up will benefit Microsoft in the long run."

Good Bet or Huge Gamble? Microsoft's Vision for the Future

2014-17-July-Nadella-Speech.jpgSure the Apple IBM partnership is a big deal, but it may not impact your work and your life as much as the vision that Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella unveiled at the company’s Worldwide Partners Conference (WPC) yesterday.

You might not have heard much about it, but that’s not because it’s not worthwhile or important — it’s just that tech news is generally aimed at enterprises, businesses and consumers, not partners (namely, other software companies, systems integrators, product vendors, consulting firms and so on).

But, if you want to know what the future looks like, partners’ conferences are exactly where you get a sneak peek. After all, this is where tech evangelists learn their scripts and where solution providers receive introductions to the kinds of thinking and training they’ll needs to deliver on those promises.

Our Favorite Tweets from the Apple-IBM Mega Deal

mobile enterprise, Our Favorite Tweets from Apple-IBM Enterprise Mega Deal

We've already offered some great perspective on the IBM-Apple Mega Deal.

Now for some comic relief.

Without further ado, here are some of our favorite tweets from the IBM-Apple deal that shook up the mobile enterprise world.

Big, Bigger, Huge: Apple, IBM Create Massive Partnership

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The future of technology as we know it took a massive step in a new direction today with the news of a partnership between Apple and IBM.

The two tech giants announced a partnership that could shift Apple from its traditional role as a consumer focused brand to a major player in the business market.

IBM plans to create a class of more than 100 business applications exclusively for iPhones and iPads to run on Apple's iOS. IBM will also market Apple's products, complete with 100 industry-specific apps, to its clients worldwide.

The Solution to Custom Code in the Cloud

If you've been living under a rock for the past five years, let me get you caught up: There’s been a shift in how technology is being embraced. Not too long ago, businesses created and purchased technology. Then that technology trickled down to the consumer level and morphed into something we’d use. Think the ENIAC  evolving after many years into the PC, etc.

That process is reversed today. The consumer experience comes first and businesses play catch up to the consumer technology. The classic example of this is mobile: we've been living on our mobile phones for several years, but only now are enterprises making their systems mobile friendly for their workforce.

Showdown at the Mobile Enterprise Corral

2014-07-July-Cowboy-Graffiti.jpgWhy have so many mobile enterprise companies made financial announcements within the last few weeks? In the mobile device management (MDM) space, Good Technology has filed an S1 to go public and MobileIron successfully executed an IPO. In the File Sync and Share (FSS) space, Dropbox announced a $500M line of credit after having raised $325M in funding only months earlier, and Box just announced another $100M investment.

Why these companies … and why now?

You Could Telecommute from Montana, Too

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When I tell people I live and work in Montana, sometimes I get puzzled expressions or even jokes. The skiers and fly fisherman understand. But some people ask: Are there phones there?

Yes, there are phones in Montana! Even broadband, and sometimes fiber. We have laptops, airports and universities, too, though they might be scattered between spectacular mountain scenery and two National Parks. When I'm not biking, skiing, or chasing kids, I spend the rest of my of my day like the rest of you: digitally communicating using collaborative tools, email and social media.

This raises some questions, such as — has technology made telecommuting easier? And can you be productive telecommuting?  The connected worker is a hot topic these days. Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer last year banned telecommuting, even though she has trouble waking up for meetings. Maybe if she worked at home she would have more time to catch up on sleep. 

And the debate took on new life today when a a new law went into effect in the United Kingdom. It gives every employee in the UK the right to work flexibly if they have been on the job for more than six months.

Quick Start Guide to Enterprise Mobile Capture

2014-26-June-Lasso.jpgEnterprise mobile capture — using smartphones and tablets to scan documents as part of your organization’s important business processes — constitutes one of the changes in the content technologies that are ending the era of enterprise content management (ECM) and bringing in the era of “content intensive applications” (or term of your choice). For those getting started in enterprise mobile capture, there are two primary issues you should address as you plan your strategy.

Who Has the Best BYOD Management Services?

social business, Who's Got the Best BYOD Management Services?

Find a company that does not have a bring your own device (BYOD) management strategy, and you'd need to welcome them to enterprise life in the 2010s.

We all do work on our personal smartphones. 

The challenge for organizations is managing all these devices, systems, networks, operating systems, public and private cloud apps and other converging factors.

Forrester Research stresses the need for BYOD management services. It released today a Wave for Global BYOD Management Services, an analysis of 13 top BYOD integrators and specialists.

The Enterprise Mobility Showdown

To achieve competitive advantage, large organizations today are developing mobile applications that meet three key objectives: 1) enable new mobile business processes for employees, 2) meet the growing mobile demands of customers, and 3) unlock new revenue potential within their business and with partners.

To accomplish this, organizations often need to integrate mobile apps with enterprise systems and data — collectively referred to as the backend.

Organizations that do not integrate mobile apps securely and effectively with their existing backend infrastructure will face competitors whose employees are more productive, whose customers are more satisfied and whose ecosystem fuels new business opportunities.

Yes, It's True: Microsoft + Salesforce are Hooking Up

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Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff has a new BFF — and he’s none other than Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella.

You have to give Benioff credit for leveraging his Zen Buddhist learnings and urging Microsoft to regain its “beginner's mind.” Last year, at TechCrunch Disrupt, he called Microsoft “such a disaster” that only Bill Gates could save it.

In 2010, Microsoft sued Salesforce for nine patent infringements and Benioff called Microsoft a patent troll.

Today Benioff was busy on Twitter, posting pictures of himself and Nadella in various settings, sometimes even looking like lovebirds. 

Syncplicity Challenge: Give Up Your PC and Mac for 30 Days

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Everyone’s talking about the Mobile First, Cloud First world. In fact, shortly after being named CEO of Microsoft, Satya Nadella announced that from here on out Microsoft would become a Mobile First, Cloud First company.

Want to bet how many people at Microsoft headquarters in Redmond, Wash. still spend most of their work time on PC’s?

Rather than count, let’s just say most.

That being said, we do know of a company that has challenged its employees to go Mobile Only for 30 days. And not only did the employees agree to try Syncplicity's Go Lite Challenge: They also achieved their goal.

Salesforce1 Mobile App: Better than Dynamics and Siebel?

customer experience, Salesforce1 Mobile App: Better than Dynamics and Siebel?

Salesforce gained an edge over its competitors with its move to mobilize CRM processes. Its new mobile app for the enterprise empowers sales professionals to do “business on the move,” analysts told CMSWire.

“It’s difficult to judge against all enterprise apps, as they all serve very different purposes,” said Richard Absalom, senior analyst for Enterprise Mobility for London-based Ovum Research.

“But CRM is really low-hanging fruit in terms of a process that can be immediately improved by mobilizing. From that point of view, Salesforce1 does stand out, making it easier for the huge number of sales professionals using Salesforce to do business on the move. Making it available through any browser should mean that it can reach a wider audience, and the range of new features in this update looks pretty impressive.”

5 Mobile App Policies You Need

You can’t go mobile with a desktop mindset — but that’s just what too many IT organizations do. The most commonly applied mobile app policies are holdovers from the PC environment, like two-factor authentication and selective access based on Active Directory membership. These measures may be useful in a traditional computing setting, but they’re woefully inadequate for the new world of enterprise mobility. They fail to account for concepts like jailbroken devices, bring-your-own-device (BYOD), untrusted public networks and offline usage.

To make enterprise mobility both secure and fully productive, you need to apply new policies designed specifically for the way mobile users work today. It’s not just about introducing restrictions and roadblocks — you also need to empower people to do even more with their mobile apps and devices to enable greater business value.

The Mobile Enterprise Won't Be Built in a Day

2014-20-May-Subway-Rider.jpgOnly last year, the industry was abuzz with news about "Bring Your Own (BYO)" programs … Since then organizations have discovered three things: 1. Supporting an open list of employee-owned equipment is not practical. 2. Deploying a manageable and scalable mobile security infrastructure is "easier said than done." Plus, it’s taking longer than anticipated to get all the pieces in place. 3. So far, the only business applications workers have been able to use are email, contact management and calendar.

These complications have limited the payback that organizations have been able to reap from their BYO programs. Organizations are dealing with the first two items by limiting their approved list of supported devices, and by (finally) deploying mobile device management (MDM) or similar security solutions.

However, the lack of real business apps remains a problem.

Why Google Just Bought Divide

Yes you can use your Android phone for work and do so with the CIO’s blessing. Maybe the corporate watchdogs aren’t telling you this quite yet, but chances are that they will before long.

Why? Because Google just purchased mobile device management company, Divide.

Formerly known as Enterproid, Divide enables you to keep your work and personal life separate on a single mobile device. This is critical for both employers who need to keep in strict control of their corporate information and for individuals who worry about their personal devices getting accidentally wiped by their employers, should a breach occur.

With Divide IT gets the security and control it needs, including governance and government-grade encryption to protect all business apps and data. Workers, at the same time, are able to enjoy privacy on their personal devices as well as the ability to access a suite of professional-grade business apps to get work done on the go.

This is what BYOD solutions should look and act like.

Microsoft + SAP Partner for Cloud, Mobile, Big Data

Microsoft and SAP are two 2nd Platform technology players that are leaving no holds barred as they attempt to carry their dominance onto the third.

Cloud, big data and mobile are three big components of that next wave (social is the fourth, but it seems to be morphing from a platform to a feature in enterprise applications) and both companies need to be ready when their clients begin to make the leap — or, needless to say, they’ll lose business.

Jitterbit Releases DIY Harmony Integration Platform

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Solutions are one thing. Integration is another — and it's often is a bigger deal than the solutions themselves. To address that bottleneck, Jitterbit has announced general availability of its cloud-based enterprise Harmony Integration Platform.

The idea is to connect applications across a business "in days, rather than weeks or months," the company noted. The Alameda, Calif.-based Jitterbit touts its "Clicks Not Code" approach, where business analysts and other non-technical users can connect applications and build connected processes using a graphical interface. The company is positioning this ease-of-use as a key differentiator with other integration solutions.

Getting to the 'What, When and How' of Mobile Strategy

2014-30-April-Starting-Line.jpgThe questions around how to become a truly mobile enterprise currently centers around a “this vs. that” argument — hybrid vs. responsive? Build iOS first vs. build Android first?

It's tough to figure out a mobile approach. But while these questions are great to ask today, they don’t tackle the bigger picture of mobile strategy tomorrow.