ipad3thumb.jpg With the new iPad out in the wild, apps are being updated to add more information on-screen or improved visuals via the retina display. Flipboard, TweetDeck, Kindle Reader and others are getting rapid makeovers as Apple shows off some of its star performers.

Resolution, Baby

With all those extra pixels to play with on the new iPad's retina display, developers are rapidly retuning their apps to take advantage of the extra detail and space available. Naturally, image-based apps are all looking to boot up the resolution, which text-based, notably social and news, apps can cram in more information.

Several articles have already pointed out the benefits of the clearer text (especially for those with less than perfect sight) but developers have lots of room to play with the new level of visual fidelity that the new iPad offers. Unsurprisingly, Amazon's Kindle app was one of the first to take advantage of the better font definition and Apple has added a small section on iTunes showing off some of the best new iPad apps.

Flipping, Tweeting, Learning

Some news publications including The Daily and the New York Times have already been updating. Others are also getting a move on. Flipboard has released version 1.8.2, adding retina support to the wider 1.8 update from the beginning of the month. That update added Cover Stories to the iPad edition, an extra page of tiles for more content, full-screen images and typography makes for prettier layouts and other extras.

Elsewhere, while the Twitter app has gone all consumer-friendly, the company is planning to beef up its more hardcore TweetDeck app with new versions for iOS and Android on the way. The company has been hiring developers for the task and expect a new version soon.

Educational title Barefoot World Atlas is one of the most touted among the first wave of apps and is a great way to show off how children could benefit with a tablet around the house. Then again, it is a 1.5GB download, so perhaps one of the bigger model iPads is needed for a family device.