After months of design, implementation, and testing, the initial version of the new system for releasing Drupal contributions is finally installed and running on drupal.org. This change impacts everyone who uses or maintains contributions (modules, themes, etc) from drupal.org. Contributions have a new version number scheme, and at long last, official releases.Changes for Drupal Users The most visible change for end-users of Drupal contributions is that the version numbers have now changed. The addition of official releases, will rationalize administration of the modules and contributions your site depends on. These will have a fixed, unchanging set of code, so you will always be able to easily identify exactly what code your site is running. If a new release is available, instead of having to compare dates on release packages, users will be able to reference the version numbers. Additionally, if a site is running an older version of Drupal core (which is quite common), but admins would still like to use new features from some of the modules they are running, it is now possible for module maintainers to provide both stable and development releases of their modules for any versions of Drupal core they wish to support. See the project pages for the contributions for additional details, or submit issues to their issue queue requesting that they provide a development release if one is not available. Remember that sponsoring these efforts is always appreciated! Changes for Drupal Developers Along with the new release system, there have been a lot of updates and changes to the Drupal CVS repository this year. Because of these changes, all CVS account holders and project maintainers should review the updated CVS and Project documentation. The handbook outlines the policies and procedures to use going forward for maintaining projects, managing releases and proper branching and tagging of contributions on Drupal.org. More information available here. In related open source cms news, Joomla was recently awarded first prize in Packt Publishing's Best Open Source CMS award, followed closely by Drupal and Plone.