When we examine content strategy we usually focus on the words, audience, goals and messaging. But we rarely look at time. A few interesting statistics were released this week, bringing the issue of time management to the forefront.

Content Creation: Time Invested

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When we think of content development and management, especially within social media, it’s a wonder there’s enough time to create, publish and share content and get it noticed. But those of us who manage and monitor social media, blogs and other content-heavy outlets, it can sometimes feel like we’re swimming against the current.

A recent post by Christopher Penn on his blog further highlighting the amount of time we and our readers spend creating and consuming content. He writes:

One of the biggest lies in social media is that it’s free. While bandwidth costs are negligible and devices amortize out over time to pennies a day, the one thing that grows more valuable every day is time. Social media is not free. Social media costs you as a content creator the time it takes you to create, and it costs everyone who listens to you the time it takes them to enjoy what you’ve created.

Content Creation: Value Added

It’s true that social media curation isn't free. Though, social media is mostly a free platform,  the time you dedicate to it can add up, quickly. But like any other essential communication, it needs to become a regular part of your day, in order to be effective and successful. And it works both ways. For each minute we spend writing and pushing out content, we are also relying that our readers spend the same amount of time clicking, reading and sharing what we wrote.

An effective content strategy strives to strike a balance between your time and your readers. Interestingly, that’s similar to what the National Archives found when they asked what type of social media is worth keeping. Ultimately, it comes down to value added.