Oracle Customer Experience Strategy Aligns Social with Cloud #oow13
Oracle's social, cloud and customer experience strategies have gained a bit more clarity this week at OpenWorld 2013, and what those parts of Oracle's business all have in common is they are imparting themselves on all other parts of the company.

Social, Cloud + CX are Features and Products

As with Oracle's moves around integrating hardware and software, the company is attempting to do the same with social, cloud and customer experience technologies. One big part of this has been the ongoing integration of the Eloqua technology Oracle acquired in 2012. Eloqua's marketing technology is also being integrated into Oracle's many products, but on the social, cloud and customer experience fronts, that integration is just as much about strategy as it is technology.

Like so many large IT companies, Oracle is struggling to marry its business applications business with the more recent and fast moving social, CX and cloud technologies. Just a few short years ago, Larry Ellison called the idea of cloud technology rubbish, and perhaps that is why he skipped his own cloud keynote session at this year's OpenWorld conference.

His investment in an America's Cup racing team also distracted him from focusing on business, and Ellison in fact was out on the water during the time he was supposed to be giving his keynote. Convenient. Nevertheless, David Vap, group VP at Oracle and Reggie Bradford, an Oracle SVP took the stage this week to cover the company's customer experience and social offerings.

CMO's + CIO's Common Future

CMOs are spending more on IT, and CIOs are focusing more on the business side of things, Bradford said, that is one of the underpinnings of the collision between cloud, social and customer experience. More to the point, however, is that digital marketing is what really links all of these ideas together. Not that social, customer experience and cloud are only marketing schemes, but more that marketing is where they help provide the most worth to organizations.

"It's less about transactions and more about relations," Michael Dell, founder and CEO of Dell Inc, said as he opened the keynote address from the Oracle team.

"Computing has moved from the back office to the forefront of how companies are run."

That technological change has now gone from everyday users of things like smartphones and tablets, to the highest peaks of computing giants like Oracle. It's been a rapid disruption, and Oracle is now lurching toward a more or less recognizable position on social, cloud and customer experience. The company still has a ways to go on integrating the many acquisitions it has made over the last three years, but at least its leaders are providing us a glimpse of it ultimately plans to unify its many, many offerings.