Six Apart, Apperceptive, Six Apart Media
Six Apart knows there's nothing worse than an out of work journalist. That's why the company who makes the major commercial blogging platforms TypePad and Movable Type is offering pro-level blog memberships for free to out-of-work media types.

The Six Apart Offer

The blogs, which usually cost $150 a year, come with lots features and customer support. The goal of this initiative is to allow journalists to maintain their identity and let writers get "up and running with [their] own site that [they] can start to benefit from." While Type Pad plans to let bloggers in on its ad program, as well as most of the revenue from any ads on their blogs, no one is under the impression that anyone will be making lots of money. It's more of a Public Works Program. Promoted as The TypePad Journalist Bailout Program, bloggers can send their last piece for a newspaper, magazine or broadcast journalism venue to bailout@sixapart.com, and they'll take care of the rest. This offer won't last long and submissions have been flooding in since the announcement.

Desperate Measures for Desperate Times?

While it might sound like desperate measures for desperate times, the bailout can be seen as a way for journalists who have suffered the print industry's economic wrath to keep their resume current, or to promote their portfolio online. TypePad sells the program as a way for writers to have "complete control, with no dependence on the whims of a publisher, and no interference from an outside editor." For better or for worse, of course. In addition, Six Apart will promote the new site on Blogs.com, a directory of the best in blogs, which will be a way for all of the bloggers peers in the Journalist Bailout Program to cross-promote and share traffic for their independent sites.

The Internet as a Safe Haven for Journalists?

The internet, while not immune to economic strife, is seen as a safe haven by many; a place where a little bit of innovation and self-promotion can keep anyone from being unemployed. The web has always been a place where anything goes and where anyone is due their fifteen minutes of fame. While once mocked for such openness, the internet could be redeemed for the such freedom.