squirrel doing a makeover for a llama
Let's face it, DAM's about as exciting as telling someone to "eat their vegetables" PHOTO: sammydavisdog

In a scene from my favorite episode of the TV show “Parks and Recreation,” Leslie Knope is appalled by the extremes a chard stand has to go to through to gain the support of the farmers’ market community. 

Despite the nutrients and vitamins chard provides, and insane benefits like helping prevent cancer, reducing the likelihood of diabetes and essentially giving your cognition a super boost, the fact remains: people really don't care about chard.

Let me tell you now: digital asset management (DAM) is the chard of the software world.

Eat Your DAM Greens

DAM hits about the same level of market sexiness to the average consumer as chard does. In spite of the many benefits DAM provides, people just don't care.

Many consumer's first introduction to DAM is probably someone from the industry telling them how good DAM is for them and how many vitamins and nutrients it provides and basically, driving home the point that DAM is as exciting as leafy green vegetables.

Rehabilitating Chard

Back to the episode. Instead of explaining why chard is so great, the stand owner embarks on a dramatic and risqué marketing campaign. The campaign is designed to entice and attract new customers, and people really start to pay attention. 

Customers take selfies with the chard and engage with the brand at the “Farmers’ Market After Dark.”  Chard becomes something that resonates with people based on an artificially created perceived value. Because let's face it: chard was already pretty great on the inside — it just needed a sexy makeover on the outside.

DAM Is a 'Brand' and It's One That Needs a Makeover

The DAM industry lacks substance about its overall brand, and that is a big problem. The lack of widespread recognition of the DAM industry and recognition of our place and growth in the larger digital industry could very well affect long-term success.

Why Isn’t DAM Globally Recognized

Picture a world where no one knew what Google was, or what “to Google” meant.  

That’s where the DAM industry are now. We’re sitting on something really fantastic that hasn’t managed to become as comparably ubiquitous and recognizable a household name. We gain traction, it seems, but not enough to explode to the level where you no longer have to explain DAM to your uncle, brother, sister, mother, neighbor, etc.

And I am tired of explaining DAM, aren’t you?

So what are we, as an industry, going to do to reinvent our brand?