Raise your hand if this sounds familiar: you’re watching a video on a retail site, and see a great jacket featured that you wanted more details about. The video ends, you click to the website, search for a bit without success and ... lose interest.

With Adobe’s new Shoppable Video authoring tool and player, your hunting days may be numbered.

Included with Adobe’s Experience Manager Assets and Dynamic Media, the tool allows marketers to create videos in which consumers can click on and purchase products they see in the video.

2015-21-Aug-Alcala-Image1“The problem with current video formats is that typically you might see a video of a product and want to purchase, but you’re not sure where to find it on the website,” said Vebeka Guess, product marketing manager for Adobe Experience Manager.

“With Shoppable Video we’ve enabled marketers to take any video that is part of their experience, and allow shoppers to view products shown, while associating them with products that exist in their store.”

Making Video Work for Business

Adobe received feedback from customers, said Guess, that videos are typically special projects, either made by agencies or developed in some customized way.

She used the example of a back to school campaign that might include a separate microsite, landing page and links into a shoppable experience.

Once that campaign ends, the company can find it difficult to use that video at scale or integrate it into their content workflow, as it’s part of a microsite. Tying the video event back into an analytics system is also a challenge, which leaves marketers with no clear conversion numbers.

Guess added that many times, video produced by agencies wouldn’t be compatible with other players, or couldn’t easily be uploaded to a company’s content management system.

“Shoppable Video uses a standard player so that marketers cannot only make videos shoppable, but publishable within their content.”

How It Works

Shoppable Video is designed to be used by non-technical marketers, said Guess.

Here’s how it works:

To start with Shoppable Video, define the segments of the video in which you want a product highlighted. Then search in the content finder to find existing assets, including the thumbnails used on the screen.

A drag and drop interface allows you to associate assets with various segments of the video. For example, retailers could tie an asset to a quick view of the product using the SKU value, category or color.

You can also tie a thumbnail to a particular URL associated with a landing page, lead generation content or campaign form.


Not Just for Retail

While the implications for retail are obvious, Guess noted that several other industries can benefit from Shoppable Video.

“We’d been getting a lot of requests from marketers to make video more interactive and link them to conversion events, lead generation and other opportunities,” said Guess.

For example, companies in the travel and hospitality arenas can link to details on dining or conference services within videos. Those in finance can link overview videos to other content on specific topics, such as financial planning.

Other ways Shoppable Video can be used include linking to how-to videos, product training information or product documentation.

Guess added that Adobe.com uses the product to create links to details on documentation or additional classes to learn more about the products shown in its videos.

Regardless of the industry, video remains a key driver of conversions, said Guess.

“Both in Adobe.com and in our customer experiences we’ve seen that when customers watch all or part of a video, conversion to the next step is double than that if they see no video,” she said.

“Any type of industry can lead with video, but for customers to chase around a product moving around in video is very disruptive to the experience. We’re trying to make it easier for marketers and customers to take the next step in that experience.”

Creative Commons Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License Title image by  zoetnet