LAS VEGAS — While there is no shortage of content online, the world can use more intelligent content — a strategic approach to managing information.

That’s the big takeaway at this year’s Intelligent Content Conference, which was acquired by the Content Marketing Institute (CMI) in June 2014. The two-day conference, which ends today, included four tracks: content strategy, tools and technology, basics and advanced sessions.

About 350 people are attending the event, which was preceded by a full day of pre-conference workshops and a reception.

Smart Content is a Strategy

The event was founded by The Rockley Group’s Ann Rockley and co-produced by The Content Wrangler’s Scott Abel.

Rockley is known for coining the term “intelligent content” or content that is “structurally rich and semantically aware.”

While that might sound like a mouthful, intelligent content essentially refers to a content strategy approach that helps publishers of all kinds deliver the right results to their customers.

Joe Pulizzi, founder of the Cleveland, Ohio-based CMI, kicked off the event yesterday by welcoming the content strategists and marketers.

“We’re thinking of [content marketing] as part of our … IT strategy, our communication strategy,” Pulizzi said. “But not as our business strategy.

Robert Rose, CSO of Content Marketing Institute, followed Pulizzi with a keynote addressing the state of the content business. “Content is at the heart of all this,” Rose said of the digital evolution.

“Your future does not lie in managing content to fit your business … Content will be a business strategy [in the future]. The future content practitioner will be a business strategist.”

The Next Content Players

About 13 exhibitors, including Hippo, Lionbridge, Marketing.AI and News360, displayed their solutions in a ballroom where attendees stocked up on refreshments and conference swag. Others of note included:

MediaValet: A cloud-based digital asset management tool, it is built on Microsoft's Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) Azure cloud platform. This DAM with triple-replication gives organizations handling large quantities of video, audio and image files a place to manage and search for them using metadata, keywords, categories or approval statuses. The Vancouver, British Columbia-based company branched out on its own about two years ago from VRX Studios Inc. CEO David MacLaren noted that organizations of all sizes, industries and locations are struggling with the sheer amount of content they need to manage today — "let alone tomorrow.”

TrackMaven: Founded in Washington, DC, in 2012, the company helps content marketers analyze their marketing content — across paid, owned, and earned channels — alongside their competitors’ content. Using this information, clients can identify marketing opportunities, optimize content distribution timing and channel decisions, and track progress in real-time, the company boasted. Users can also monitor the social media activity and content of other brands and competitors to understand what content worked well and why.

Knovio: Headquartered in Lincoln, Mass., just outside of Boston, Knovio’s platform wants to transform PowerPoints to more interactive presentations. As the company claimed, "Making compelling on-demand video content has never been easier." Companies use the platform internally for training and sales purposes and universities are adopting it for class work. The platform offers a tablet and mobile application, so users can record and participate on different devices and share with others on social media or email and upload to YouTube.

ActiveStandards: A digital governance platform, this company aims to help businesses manage their policies and standards. Almost all businesses are online now, but they may not know to follow best practices or W3C standards. ActiveStandards goes in and finds all those instances in websites so that companies don’t have to manually find their errors — mistakes that can cost a lot in resources and money. ActiveStandards started back in the ’90s building large corporate websites, but around 2009 it switched focus to quality management.

Acrolinx: A software to create focused content, used by clients like IBM, Google and Hitachi. Acrolinx’s linguistic analytics engine judges a piece of content in style, readability, SEO, terminology and tone. The goal is more impactful content that drives business results, the company claims. The software will grade content quality with a score based on thousands of rules as users write and provides real-time analysis and suggestions. It will, for example, suggest to writers what words and phrases to use in order to match the tone they want or identify complex sentences to create cleaner copy.

Upwork: The Upwork Enterprise plan connects companies with freelance talent, ranging from mobile developers and designers to writers and virtual assistants. Upworkclaims it can save businesses 60 to 90 percent over going through agencies. The company claims its network comprises of about 2,700 kinds of skills, and 90 percent of clients rehire those workers. The Freelancer Management System tackles talent sourcing in the freelancer market through the point of recruiting and onboarding. According to Upwork, Amazon, Pinterest and Unilever have hired on the system. The company relaunched in 2015 out of two older online work platforms, oDesk andElance.

Check back for more coverage on ICC in Las Vegas this week, and follow the conversation on Twitter at #intelcontent.