Google neon sign with strange font
Google revealed more details about Drive File Stream, Microsoft and Adobe got cozy with new integrations and more news PHOTO: Alper Çuğun

Google Drive is on its ways out. 

Mountain View, Calif.-based Google announced this week it will start closing down Drive on Dec. 11 and Drive will stop working completely on March 12, 2018.

Before you panic, note that Google is not doing away with Drive itself, but only the apps for PC and Mac.

In their place, Google is offering Backup and Sync for consumers, and Drive File Stream for businesses.

More Details on Google Drive File Stream 

Backup and Sync was unveiled a few months ago — in fact it was unveiled twice — and while Google mentioned at the time plans to release Drive File Stream for businesses, it didn't offer many details beyond that.

In a blog post this week, Google gave a little bit more detail about the business offering. Drive File Stream is a new desktop application that the company claims will give users quick access to all Google Drive files on demand, directly from a computer.

This puts low demands on a computer's hard drive and reduces time spent waiting for files to sync.

Backup and Sync syncs files in the usual manner by placing local copies on the desktop and then backing them up in the cloud.

PC users will have the option to use either Backup and Sync or Drive File Stream, so for the sake of clarity Google offered the following guidance:

By October, PC and Mac users will likely start seeing messages telling them about the change. While little will change for consumers, businesses at that stage will have to choose which app they want to use.

Microsoft, Adobe Take Relationship to New Level

San Francisco-based Adobe and Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft have announced they are taking their partnership to a new level.

According to a joint statement, Azure is to be the preferred public cloud for the Adobe Sign e-signature tool and Teams will be "preferred" collaboration service for Adobe Creative Cloud, Document Cloud and Experience Cloud. In return, Adobe Sign will be the ‘preferred’ e-signature tool for Office 365.

The solutions must have been in the works for some time as the two companies announced the first joint solutions will be available within weeks.

“Adobe and Microsoft are working together to redefine what the modern enterprise experience looks like with collaboration, identity, data and intelligence at the core. Together we will develop integrated cloud services with best-in-class solutions like AdobeSign and Office 365 that help businesses digitally transform while delivering great experiences to their customers,” Abhay Parasnis, chief technology officer of Adobe said in the statement.

While there is clearly a lot to be said for offering a ‘preferred’ e-signature tool for Office 365, other elements of the partnership will improve productivity and processes across the enterprise. Among them are:

  1. Adobe Creative Cloud and Adobe Stock integration with Microsoft Teams gives Adobe Creative Cloud customers a flexible collaboration workspace. Teams integration with the Adobe Experience Cloud will be expanded in the future.
  2. Adobe Sign integration with Microsoft Teams will speed up electronic signing processes using a bot that will enable users track and manage documents.
  3. Adobe Sign will also be integrated with Microsoft Flow enabling the creation of digital work processes. This will be expanded in the coming months when Flow is integrated with SharePoint, Dynamics and OneDrive.
  4. Adobe Sign for Microsoft Dynamics and Microsoft SharePoint is already available. New Adobe Sign integrations for Microsoft Teams, Microsoft Flow, Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint and Microsoft Outlook are expected to be available in the coming weeks.
  5. Adobe Creative Cloud integration with Microsoft Teams is also expected to be available in the coming weeks with Experience Cloud integrations to follow.

Microsoft and Adobe announced their partnership last year at the Ignite conference. At the time, Microsoft said the goal was to advance both companies' visions of digital transformation and accelerate the delivery of relevant, personalized experiences.

While e-signatures often go overlooked in the development of digital transformation strategies, enterprises have started recognizing their value and their importance in building automated processes over the last two years.

Bringing e-signature capabilities to Office 365 is going to improve the overall experience for Microsoft customers, while Adobe will get massive new market traction for its e-signature product given Office 365's over 100 million users.

Adobe Sign for Microsoft Dynamics and Microsoft SharePoint is already available. New Adobe Sign integrations for Microsoft Teams, Microsoft Flow, Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint and Microsoft Outlook are expected to be available in the coming weeks.

Adobe Creative Cloud integration with Microsoft Teams is also expected to be available in the coming weeks with Experience Cloud integrations to follow.

Dropbox Tweaks Collaboration Abilities

Dropbox has also been tweaking its collaboration abilities, with a number of upgrades to its collaboration tool Paper, including pre-loading preview capabilities.

In a blog post about the release, the Paper team wrote:

“We are designing Dropbox Paper to help teams break out of siloed app experiences while fostering creativity and collaboration. Paper helps teams stay in flow by working together in fast, fluid, and creative ways.”

The post goes on to list other improvements to “foster creativity and collaboration,” including InVision and Figma design tools integration and a new create-and-upload endpoint to the Paper API, enabling users to create or edit Paper docs in their own apps.

A redesign of the Dropbox homepage brings users’ Paper docs and Dropbox files together for the first time.

It’s yet another move to make Dropbox an easy-to-use collaboration tool for the enterprise, as rumors of an IPO grow.

SpringCM Gets FedRAMP Certified

Finally this week, Chicago-based SpringCM has announced it has achieved Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (Fed RAMP) Authorization.

This, in effect, means it offers a FedRAMP compliant Contract Lifecycle Management (CLM) solution.

FedRAMP is a US government-wide program that provides a standardized approach to security assessment, authorization and continuous monitoring for cloud products and services.

FedRAMP Authorization is a big one for SpringCM as the public sector is one of its target areas in a much wider expansion strategy, which includes running campaigns to go after install bases of proprietary systems, in particular, OpenText and Documentum. 

The FedRAMP certification couldn't come at a better time. 

Government agencies are aggressively moving to the cloud, looking to reduce time and money spent on generating, storing, collaborating and managing documents. It’s almost a limitless market, so this represents a major step forward for SpringCM.