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Advertising News & Analysis

See What? B2B Marketers Takeaways on Ad Viewability

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B2B marketers need to measure if people see their ads.

Naturally, right? Industry insiders refer to this as "viewability." Google cares a lot about this.

So should B2B marketers, said Elizabeth Harz, president of media at ADARA, a digital advertising platform based in Mountain View, Calif.

"Driving for the broadest reach with the lowest expense possible may dictate for lower viewability goals versus attempting to run 100 percent viewable campaigns, which may result in lower ROI," Harz told CMSWire. "All marketers need to first define the goal or expectation of their campaigns and then align metrics like viewability to those goals."

If You Put a Man in Front of a Red Background, Will Your Ad Sell More?

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Your intuition isn't as smart as you think. Neither, apparently, is Albert Einstein, a new study from Rocket Fuel suggests.

Einstein believed in intuitions and inspirations. "I sometimes feel that I am right. I do not know that I am," he told a reporter for  “The Saturday Evening Post” in 1929.

But in a study released today, Rocket Fuel suggests it's time to ignore what you think and follow the path of science and technology … at least if you want to create the perfect ad.

The programmatic ad tech firm claims it's uncovered the recipe for online ad success. A bold statement? Perhaps. But Rocket Fuel claims this is a data driven boast.

The company used big data analysis to evaluate more than 38,000 online ads, categorizing them to determine which elements played a role in engaging consumer response. And what it found was that things like the color red, male faces and animation statistically increase the response rate of digital ads.

"Who knew 'seeing red' could make a person want to open an online ad? And what is it about male faces that screamed 'buy it now' driving higher conversion rates than ads that featured women?" the company asked.

Make Your Brand Stand Out in a Crowded, Multichannel World

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For a long time, the big brands had it relatively easy. Advertise, buy shelf space, sell stuff. Then came the Internet.

With the rapid growth of global e-commerce, some of the biggest brands have found themselves challenged. Myriad new competitors offer good value at a lower price. Consumers have the option of switching brands with a click. Travelers can find the lowest airfare with a quick search.

Landor Associates has helps companies re-postition themselves in this new age, including household names like Levi Strauss, Rolex, Hanesbrands, Macy's, P&G and Old Spice.

New Digital Ad Playbook Focuses on Big Data

Data is used in marketing and advertising. Nothing new there.

But just how to use it? A few companies hope to answer that question in a new "Best Practices Playbook" for executing data-driven dynamic advertising campaigns.

Jivox, a San Mateo, Calif.-based ad platform provider, partnered with Merkley + Partners and TVGla to produce the playbook. The goal is to help marketers make sense of an increasingly data-driven digital advertising world.

Smaato Promises Mobile Publishers More Control, More Money

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Smaato, a company that offers advertising tools for mobile publishers and developers, just launched the Smaato Publisher Platform (SPX), an ad server for mobile publishers.

The San Francisco-based company claims it will help publishers and developers monetize their apps and maximize their mobile advertising fill rates and the effective cost per thousand impressions (eCPMs).

With more than a million apps on the market and new ones constantly arriving, the ad industry "needs a platform that thinks mobile first,” said Ajitpal Pannu, Chief Business Officer at Smaato. “This mindset requires that these content creators take better control of their monetization abilities."

Smaato operates a mobile real time bidding (RTB) ad exchange and Sell Side Platform across 80,000 mobile app developers and mobile publishers. It also globally connects more than ad networks and 240 demand-side platforms on the demand side.

SPX, built for the supply side, is a "first step towards building integrated mobile monetization platform,” he said.

4 Ways Marketers Can Move Mobile Advertising Forward

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On the heels of recent research centered around how companies are falling short with mobile marketing, comes a new report — this time with similarly disappointing findings around mobile advertising, in particular.

The AdExchanger Research report, titled Mobile’s Unmet Potential (available for purchase), finds that although marketers, technology providers and agencies surprisingly share the same vision for the future of mobile advertising, no such agreement exists regarding how to achieve that vision.

Can Advertisers Reconnect With Cord Cutters?

Advertisers are struggling to reconnect with cord cutters — people who have abandoned cable and broadcast television in favor of online streaming services.

While TV advertising is in no real danger of going bust any time soon,  a new report shows that Internet ad revenues now surpass those of broadcast TV.

As a result, it's become more challenging to get advertisements in front of over-the-top (OTT) content viewers who have shifted to the screens of mobile devices. OTT refers to delivery of audio, video and other media over the Internet without the involvement of a multiple-system operator in the control or distribution of the content.

But Rick Miller, vice president of customer insights at Networked Insights, said this shift also presents opportunities for advertisers who can align their TV media buys with the right online programming faster than their competitors. “We expect the profile of the 'typical' OTT viewer to change a lot as the segment matures, but today these consumers have distinct habits,” he said.

What B2B Marketers Can Learn from Super Bowl Advertisers

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$4.5 million. That’s the record-breaking, going rate at NBC for a 30-second spot in this year’s Super Bowl, according to AdWeek. And brands are doing everything they can think of to squeeze the most value out their hefty investments.

From Doritos’ “Crash the Super Bowl” campaign, which will run two customer-created ads during the Feb. 1 game, to the multi-social media war room and event strategy of Bud Light, B2B marketers can learn a lot from Super Bowl advertisers — including the fact "puppies never fail."

Ad Forecasters Offer 'Mildly Bizarre' Glimpse of the Future

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There are two things all advertising geeks love: graphics and numbers – lots and lots of numbers. You can positively hear the crunching sound of those digits whenever you’re in the presence of anyone in an advertising-related industry. (Full disclosure, I once worked for an advertising agency in Chicago.)

With that in mind, Borrell Associates' recent webinar on digital advertising was not surprisingly number-centric – with a bit of ad and social media history, some Miley Cyrus references and a plethora of predictions for what the future of advertising holds in our increasingly digitized world.

For a point of reference, the very first television ad appeared 73 years ago on July 1st, 1941. It consisted of a Bulova watch ticking for 60 seconds with the voiceover: “America runs on Bulova time.”

Length is Everything [Infographic]

All that stuff about size is silly. The real thing to worry about is "How long should it be?" — the question every student has asked since a teacher assigned a report on topic (fill in the blank) for homework. 

Length has grown nothing but more important in the online world, a fact anyone who has struggled to trim a too long tweet understands. 

So how many characters long should a tweet be to get the most engagement, or how many words long should a blog post be so that it actually gets read? The team at SumAll, a company that markets a social media analytics and business dashboard, knows.

LeadSift Promises Smarter Ad Targeting through Twitter

Twitter has yet to reach its full potential when it comes to ad targeting. The social networking site has long been playing catchup to Facebook, which launched its email-based targeting service in 2012. Twitter didn’t announce its “tailored audiences” service until this past January.

With Facebook, advertisers can also target people by the “interests” the site asks new users to fill in when creating an account. Twitter’s answer to this was to let advertisers push their marketing messages to users based on who the user follows.

For example, if a user follows several football players, coaches and commentators, they may receive a targeted ad from a company selling sports drinks. More recently, Twitter announced the ability for advertisers to target consumers based on keywords found within a user’s tweets.

Friday Fun Day: Insider's Guide to Facebook Image Sizes

2014-15-August-Oven-Roast.jpgFacebook may generate a lot of hate. But it generates even more interest — especially from marketers who struggle daily to keep up with its ever changing guidelines on how and what to do everything from encourage page "likes" to keep customers engaged.

So it was with great interest that I stumbled upon a blog by Emily Goodrich. She's a technical writer at Heyo, a Blacksburg, Va.-based startup that wants to help small-business owners gain followers on sites like Facebook and Twitter and convert those followers into email captures and sales. 

Goodrich shared a marketing essential: a Facebook image size cheatsheet.

AdStage Invites Clients to Build Their Own Algorithms

2014-13-August-equations.jpgIn a market where the best known advertising platforms focus on high-end customers, a growing San Francisco startup is aiming for the masses.

AdStage today introduced a simple tool that allows its 1,000 beta customers to build their own algorithms for placing ads across the four networks it currently serves: Google AdWords, LinkedIn Ads, Facebook and Bing Ads.

The company's 11 engineers tried to find the right algorithm themselves, but quickly discovered that normalizing the code for such diverse networks tended to make the result less efficient. So AdStage designed a relatively simple interface called Automated Rules that lets its clients design the algorithm that suits their needs.

Yep, Facebook Generates a Lot of Hate

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Let's face it, social media networks are annoying ... but we can't live without them.

Especially Facebook. The controversy around the social media giant's re-launch of Facebook Messenger has once again stirred up a nest of privacy concerns.

Like all social networks, Facebook has benefits and warts. The benefit is that it is sublimely designed, it works very well, its got a gigantic user base (including most of your friends) and its got a world-class team constantly refining and tweaking it.

The downside is that Facebook is an immensely commercial operation and it doesn't seem to care too much about your privacy. This is not Craigslist. Let's face it: Facebook is chronicling every subtle activity in your life in a gigantic database so it can cash in on your life. 

Facebook Shuts the Gate on Likes

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Here's disappointing news for every consumer who likes to "like" a page on Facebook just to get a $10 off coupon or a by-one-get-one-free offer.

The social network has blocked companies from requiring customers to like a Facebook pages in exchange for contest entries or other company rewards — a practice known as like-gating.

According to a Facebook developers blog post, effective Aug. 7, companies are prohibited from incentivizing customers to “use social plugins or to like a page.” It's still acceptable to ask people to like your page — but they have to like it because, well, they actually like it. Existing apps have until Nov. 5 to comply with the new mandate.

Jim Belosic, CEO of ShortStack, said the move shouldn’t be a big surprise to most seasoned social media marketers. “The overall reaction has been great because I think that many businesses saw this coming, or if not, had turned away from Like-gating on their own over the last six months to a year,” he said. 

So, why have companies moved away from like-gating, and what can marketers use in its place? 

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