HOT TOPICS: Customer Experience Marketing Automation Social Business SharePoint 2013 Document Management Big Data Mobile DAM

Apple News & Analysis

Apple's IBM Play Isn't Only About Selling More iDevices

Apple wants a seat at the enterprise table and IBM will soon be rolling out the red carpet that leads to the boardroom. Sure, Big Blue’s CEO Ginni Rommety might have to help Apple Chief Tim Cook tie his tie and polish his shoes first, but it’s a fair trade.  He might have to tell her the difference between an application and an app. Other than a few small hurdles like those, the earliest days of the IBM and Apple relationship should run smooth.

After all, without needing to sacrifice turf, Rommety’s 103-year-old monolith could be perceived to be cool and forward thinking again. Not only to the old guard that holds IBM Research, with its track record of pushing the boundaries of science, technology and business to make the world work better place, in high regard, but also to the fast tracked execs of the digital generation who have tremendous respect for old guys who get it.

Yes, for IBM the Apple partnership has the potential of doing what Watson hasn’t been able to do —namely making it relevant to Gen Y and the millennials.

Not only that, but Rommety’s slowly sinking ship will be buoyed by consulting fees earned through helping enterprises roll out Mobile in a safe and compliant way.

Originate Buys Applied Intelligence Group

2014-21-July-Boston.jpg

Originate has acquired the professional services company Applied Intelligence Group, which makes digital platform solutions.

The deal gives Originate, a San Francisco-based venture and enterprise development firm, a foothold in the Boston area where Applied Intelligence is based. The two firms have worked together since 2012.  Originate already has seven other branches.

"Opening an Originate office in Boston also brings us closer to some of the country’s premier enterprises and institutions,”  Rob Meadows, CEO of Originate, said in a statement. He said Applied Intelligence adds " unparalleled talent" to solve client problems.

Thank You, Apple-IBM? Why Mega Deal is Good for Microsoft

mobile enterprise, Thank You, Apple-IBM? Why Mega Deal is Good for MicrosoftApple and IBM announce a mega deal that changes the mobile enterprise as we know it -- during the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference.

Microsoft lays off 18,000 the same week at its conference, about 14 percent of its workforce.

And there's actually a silver lining for Microsoft?

Yes, says Richard Edwards, principal analyst for Enterprise IT at London-based Ovum Research.

"It’s no coincidence that the announcement came as Microsoft was holding its Worldwide Partner Conference," Edwards told CMSWire, "but I actually think the IBM/Apple hook-up will benefit Microsoft in the long run."

Here are the IoT Top 10 Movers and Shakers

2014-07-18 Internet of Things.jpg

Earlier in the week we identified the most influential companies working on the Internet of Things (IoT).

Using the same research from the marketing influence platform provider Appinions, let’s take a look at the top ten movers and shakers. Just like the list of top 10 companies, this also holds some surprises — not least of which is the influence of two of the top dogs from HP and BlackBerry.

Our Favorite Tweets from the Apple-IBM Mega Deal

mobile enterprise, Our Favorite Tweets from Apple-IBM Enterprise Mega Deal

We've already offered some great perspective on the IBM-Apple Mega Deal.

Now for some comic relief.

Without further ado, here are some of our favorite tweets from the IBM-Apple deal that shook up the mobile enterprise world.

Big, Bigger, Huge: Apple, IBM Create Massive Partnership

2014-15-July-apple-and-ibm.jpg

The future of technology as we know it took a massive step in a new direction today with the news of a partnership between Apple and IBM.

The two tech giants announced a partnership that could shift Apple from its traditional role as a consumer focused brand to a major player in the business market.

IBM plans to create a class of more than 100 business applications exclusively for iPhones and iPads to run on Apple's iOS. IBM will also market Apple's products, complete with 100 industry-specific apps, to its clients worldwide.

Can You Name the Top 10 IoT Companies?

2014-7-14 Appinions iot products.jpg

The companies that are leading the Internet of Things (IoT) — now and in the future — are beginning to make themselves known. Appinions, in a recently published report, identified the most influential companies and what is driving them.

It probably comes as no surprise that Apple is at the top of the list, followed by Nest and Google. But there are a number of less expected companies in the mix, including — wait for it — BlackBerry.

What Mobile Marketers Need to Know About iOS 8

At the Worldwide Developers Conference in June, Apple announced a number of changes coming with release of the iOS 8 operating system being rolled out in September. Marketers who communicate with consumers via mobile must be aware of the coming changes so they can adjust their strategies and technology capabilities leading up to the release. It’s important to note though that iPhone 4 will not support iOS 8, so for the time being push strategies taking advantage of new iOS 8 capabilities will need to include legacy support for iPhone users who have not yet upgraded to a new device.

Google Feathers its Nest with New Developer Program

If Google-owned Nest’s announcement yesterday that it was buying Dropcam for $555 million caused some surprise, today’s announcement that it is opening up its platform to third-party developers, while not as in-you-face as the Dropcam deal, could have significantly more long-term effects.

Dropcam extended Google’s reach into the home through Nest. But opening the Nest platform looks like Google is aiming to corner the smart home market even if there are already some seriously heavy hitters like Apple or Samsung operating there, too.

Nest Buys Dropcam as Google Continues March Into Smart Homes

Thumbnail image for 2014-6-23 Dropcam.jpgGoogle is making another move to make its mark in the developing Internet of Things. Late Friday, Nest -- the home automation company which Google acquired in January -- announced it was buying home-monitoring camera developer Dropcam for $555 million cash.

No sooner had news of the deal emerged than questions about information, privacy and Google started to appear. However, representatives from Dropcam said this is a straightforward deal and that Google will not be getting its hands on anyone’s data.

Microsoft, Google Yield to Pressure to Improve Phone Security

Microsoft and Google will incorporate a kill switch into the next version of Windows-based and Android smartphones. The feature, which is already featured on Apple's iPhone 5, allows users to remotely wipe all data and information on the device in the event of theft.

At a press conference yesterday, New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman and San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón announced they had reached agreements with both companies to include the feature in the next iteration of their respective operating systems.

How Much Is Your Data Worth?

2014-19-June-Froggy-Love.jpgIn today’s age of information, data is currency. Information about our preferences, habits and everything in our life is a valuable commodity for companies trying to learn more about us in order to make us their customer. The value of our personal data seems to rise every day.

If our personal data is valuable, shouldn’t we guard our privacy more closely? If we are giving away information for free, how much are we getting in return? Data for services is the business model for both Google and Facebook. They provide you a free service and in return, they mine your data to drive advertising revenue. The question people don’t seem to be asking is this, “Is the average consumer aware of the value of their information to make an informed decision?”

Amazon's New Fire Phone Targets Apple

Thumbnail image for 2014-18-June-Amazon-Boxes.jpgAmazon, the company that wants to sell you everything, today introduced a phone that should make that much easier.

The Fire phone is the first smartphone from the Seattle-based retailer. But before you say ho-hum, it's not just the latest sparkly gadget. It's a clear signal that Amazon now has locked onto Apple with its infrared sensors.

Importantly, the phone connects with other Amazon services directly, meaning you'll be able to do quick price checks on 70 million products, choose from 35 million songs, tune in 160 live TV channels or watch 245,000 movies. Bandwidth sold separately, but the first year of Amazon Prime, the company's entertainment service, is included.

Brick-and-Mortar 'Cloud Store' isn't What it Seems #AmazonEvent

2014-18-June-amazon-phone.jpg

It could be a coincidence, but then again, maybe not. Either way, it seems all but certain that Amazon will finally unveil its very own smartphone later today at a launch event in Seattle.

And that could have a great deal to do with the “day-long boot camps,” “classes” and tutorials that Amazon is conducting “free of charge” in its brick-and-mortar pop-up cloud store in San Francisco.

Reports indicate the new “device,” which was probably developed in Amazon’s Silicon Valley-based hardware Lab126, will be different than the iPhone and the Android devices we use today because it will have a 3-D, Google glass-type interface.

Chances are good that even the most experienced smart phone app developers might benefit from one-on-one tutorials (like you get at the Genius Bar at Apple) or need some related training to make the most of the new device’s capabilities.

After all, in order for a new smartphone to make a dent in today’s market, its apps and services have to be incredible. And it seems that at least some of those built for Amazon’s forthcoming device already may be.

Amazon Opens a Brick-and-Mortar Cloud Store

Thumbnail image for 2014-16-June-AWSBootcamp.jpg

Retailers along San Francisco's Market Street have struggled to make a buck over the past decade, in large part because of competition from online stores like Amazon.com. So it isn't without irony that Amazon Web Services opened a brick-and-mortar pop-up store in their midst.

At first, the 30-foot wide, three-story high storefront looks empty compared to the carefully decorated windows and sales banners in neighboring stores. Then you spot the burly bouncer guarding the door, suggesting that something private is going on behind the whited-out windows. Finally, you see the modest lettering for Amazon Web Services somewhat above eye level. And still, you wonder, what is this?

This is a month-long experiment for AWS that blends one part Apple Genius Bar, two parts hip startup and a smidge of trade show marketing to produce a coffee-scented, loft-like environment where Amazon's cloud clients can ask for some free advice, attend events, get some training or, perhaps, just wash down a handful of M&Ms with a complimentary cappuccino. Day-long boot camps, normally $600, are free, like everything else here.

Displaying 1-15 of 760 results

< Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Next >