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Cloud Computing News & Analysis

Jive's Social Biz Software: You, Me, Community

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Collaboration software in the enterprise is a “must have." And many of the big software and service providers have integrated social workplace tools into their products. Microsoft has brought Yammer into Office, Salesforce provides Chatter in its cloud, VMWare has SocialCast and so on…

But Jive remains standing on its own and offers something that the aforementioned don’t — its solution centers around you, the end user, and your community, rather than a business process, document or task.

“Jive is the hub that brings it all together,” said Elissa Steele, the company’s executive vice president of marketing and products. “It breaks down silos, it’s built for collaboration and communications,” she adds.

And as such it improves the flow of information, it helps business solve problem faster and creates a competitive advantage.

Wake-Up IBM: OpenText Offers Lessons on Cloud Computing

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You can almost see it. An overweight IBM sits at the back of the cloud class while the teacher gives out prizes for cloud movement. OpenText gets a full set of gold stars ... IBM a terse note saying it could do much better.

If you hadn’t seen already, OpenText reported its financial results for the first fiscal quarter last night. In a consistently difficult global economic situation, it has managed to double its revenues on the back of its cloud computing initiatives. Compare this with IBM's dismal news earlier in the week. Despite the fact that it sees cloud computing as one of its future growth stimuli, IBM is not growing fast enough for investors.

Following SAP and Oracle, IBM Latest to Jump to Microsoft Azure

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Microsoft already partnered with SAP and Oracle on its cloud-computing platform. Why not toss in the fourth player in the Big Four?

IBM is the latest partner in Microsoft's enterprise software layer, a deal that includes:

  • IBM and Microsoft making IBM middleware such as WebSphere Liberty, MQ, and DB2 available on Microsoft Azure
  • Windows Server and SQL Server being offered on IBM Cloud
  • IBM and Microsoft working together to deliver a Microsoft .NET runtime for IBM’s Bluemix cloud development platform

Microsoft Azure welcomes the business.

The news announced yesterday comes five months after Microsoft officials said SAP will certify a number of its business applications to run on Microsoft Azure, including SAP Business Suite software, SAP Business All-In-One solution, SAP Mobile Platform, SAP Adaptive Server Enterprise (SAP ASE) and the developer edition of the SAP HANA platform.

And about a year and a half ago, Oracle jumped into the Microsoft Azure cloud. 

Find Your WorkType, Courtesy of Jive

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“How the heck did I get stuck in this role?”

Admit it, you’ve probably run out of a meeting and into your cube, hidden your face in your hands and bitten your lip to keep yourself from screaming these words or others like them — at least once or twice.

If you’re like most people, you’ve worked in a department or on a project where your “assigned” responsibilities didn’t play to your interests or strengths. Maybe you’re someone who thrives on getting things done and that job has been assigned to the dreamer in the corner who keeps coming up with new ideas instead of acting.

And then there’s that woman who keeps telling everyone how great they’re doing instead of coming up with a plan.

Wouldn’t it be great if your team lead or manager knew the work styles of you and your coworkers better? And for that matter, you’d like to know a bit more about how everyone gets things done too. Like does “soon” mean in five minutes or “I’m still thinking" about the best approach?

It depends on who you’re working with and talking to, of course.

And while it would be great if a job title reflected a person’s work style, that’s usually not the case.

Cloudera + Microsoft's Snuggle in the Cloud Causes Confusion

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Anyone that Hortonworks gets into bed with, Cloudera snuggles up to next.

This, of course, is not a proven theorem. But it sure seems to be the case lately.

Earlier this month Hadoop enterprise data hub provider Cloudera announced a deeper integration with long time Hortonworks partner Teradata. Hortonworks’ 100 percent open source Hadoop distribution (HDP) powers many of Teradata’s big data offerings, including the Teradata Appliance for Hadoop.

Yesterday, at a Microsoft press event, Mike Olson, Cloudera’s Chief Strategy Officer, shared the stage with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella and corporate vice president Scott Guthrie to announce his company’s intention to become Microsoft Azure Certified.

Take a Seat Google, Amazon: Microsoft's Cloud Wins the Day

Though the new mobile-first, cloud-first Microsoft is more open and plays nice with everyone, it also wants to knock the socks, shirt and hat off of the competition. And, if CEO Satya Nadella is right, it has everything it needs to do so.

While mobile, as Microsoft now defines it, is “not about the device” whether it’s a sensor, small screen or large screen, but about “powering mobility with intelligence,” the productivity and collaboration tools are all Microsoft (Office 365 and Dynamics).

And when it comes to the cloud, Microsoft may have one few others can match. We’re not talking only about a super-charged, hyper-scale cloud in the heavens, but also about a new Azure-like appliance that Enterprises can deploy in their own data centers. It has been designed specifically to handle big data workloads (32 cores, 450 gigabytes of RAM and 6.5 terabytes of local solid-state drive storage). Officially named the Microsoft Cloud Platform System (CPS), powered by Dell it is, in essence, an “Azure consistent cloud in a box” with pre-integrated hardware from Dell and software from Microsoft.

IBM Stumbles on its Road to the Cloud

The transition to the cloud is not happening fast enough for slow-moving IBM, which today reported disappointing third quarter results: Revenue of $22.4 billion declined 4 percent year over year and fell short of the Wall Street consensus estimate of $23.37 billion, while per-share earnings of $3.68 missed the consensus by 64 cents. 

With the second half of this year now coming in weaker than expected, the company’s outlook has gotten more hazy, so management pulled its 2015 earnings forecast of $20 a share, saying it would provide an updated figure in January.

IBM’s latest numbers have not been well received on Wall Street: the stock today is down 7 percent, earlier hitting a new 52-week low at $166.71. 

For the quarter, IBM’s global services revenue of $13.7 billion (61 percent of total revenue) was off 3 percent, while software revenue declined 2 percent to $5.7 billion and hardware revenue dropped 15 percent to $2.4 billion. “We saw a marked slowdown in September in client buying behavior,” said CEO Ginni Rometty.

Can You Make Google Love Your Global Content?

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Nǐ hǎo! ¡Hola! Konnichiwa! Oi! Guten Tag! Bonjour! Ciao! Privét! 

If your website isn’t translated into at least five of the above languages, you could be missing out on at least double your potential sales. This is the new reality of a global economy, said Alison Toon, senior director of new markets at Smartling, one of the hosts for a recent American Marketing Association webinar, “How to Make Google Love Your Global Content.”

She contends that 90 percent of global opportunities can be reached by businesses that have websites in 12 languages other than English. But many businesses seem to be missing out. When checking in with webinar participants via an interactive poll, almost 40 percent stated they currently have no website option for the non-English speaking world.

Microsoft Ignites 'One' Enterprise Strategy

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It’s still only October, but already some companies are starting to talk about what they plan to do next year. Unfortunately, the word from most tends to be pretty vague this far in advance.

Microsoft is no exception.

However, one thing Microsoft has given some very concrete details about is its conference line-up for 2015. 

For the first time ever, Microsoft is bring all its enterprise business applications together in a new conference called Ignite.

Cloudwords Localizes the Oracle Cloud

Cloudwords, a startup backed by Salesforce.com founder Marc Benioff, has beefed up its integration with the Oracle Marketing Cloud, aiming to automate and organize the process of managing the localization of B2B and B2C content

Cloudwords announced yesterday that it is now integrated with Oracle Reponsys, Oracle Content Marketing (formerly Compendium), Oracle WebCenter Sites and Oracle WebCenter Content.

HP, EMC Drop Merger Talk

Hewlett-Packard Co. has walked away from merger discussions with EMC Corp., Reuters reported today. Reuters reported HP has walked away after "months of fruitless negotiations."

The news comes as no real surprise as there were rumors earlier this month that the two companies were deadlocked over financial terms.

Real Bedfellows? Salesforce, Office 365, OneDrive & Power BI #DF14

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Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff knew the conversation would be special, so on the opening day of Dreamforce, Salesforce’s user conference in San Francisco this week, he brought Microsoft Windows Vice President Tony Prophet on stage for a fireside chat.

After some genuine, inspirational, heart-to-heart talk about their mutual charitable work at Benioff’s Children’s Hospital at University of California San Francisco (UCSF), among other things, Benioff dropped his jaw.

"A year ago at Dreamforce we would not have thought Microsoft would have been here, on stage,” he said. “It's a shock."

And to him it certainly seemed to be, and for good reason. But are things always what they seem? 

London Firm Bets Money on the Internet of Things

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Gartner expects the Internet of Things (IoT) will be driven by small entrepreneurs rather than big tech companies. And that means funding for those entrepreneurs is going to be crucial.

So far, compared with the funds available for start-ups in other areas like social or information management, there is relatively little investment in IoT start-ups. However, Reply, a London-based consulting, systems integration and digital services company, is taking up the torch and setting up a new trans-Atlantic initiative called Breed Reply.

Will Cloud Foundry Be Key to Computing's History?

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“The times they are a changin’.” For anyone who’s not a fan of rock music history that quote may not resonate, but it comes from a song that Bob Dylan wrote in the 1960s. It describes a period when the world began to change how it looked at issues like women’s rights, racism, poverty and social policy.

Though the term wasn’t used at the time, "more democratized" fits the bill pretty well. More people had an opportunity to play a role in their own future. And people began to learn that when they worked together they could get more, and often more significant things, done with greater satisfaction.

It’s interesting to note that at around this same period IBM decided to unbundle the way it sold computing to the world. Rather than offer hardware, services and software exclusively in one expensive package, where you had to buy the whole thing or nothing at all, marketers "unbundled" the components and offered them for sale individually.

It was a defining moment in computing’s history that gave birth to the multibillion-dollar software and services industries. If it hadn’t happened, all the software and consulting services in the world would have been sold by three or four vendors who, let’s face it, probably wouldn’t have been able to harness the creativity that the current market provides.

Here's What Happens When Employees BYOD

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Security-related headaches around BYOD may make users want to BYOB.

That's what you can conclude from a new survey that shows organizations with bring your own device (BYOD) policies have twice the number of security concerns as other organizations.

“BYOD introduces a variety of potential risks from security and policy perspectives, as well as end-user privacy,” said Eugene Liderman, director of the office of the CTO at Good Technology, the company that sponsored the Mid-Market Mobility Trends Survey.

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