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Emc News & Analysis

Will EMC Dump Documentum?

Alan Pelz-Sharpe thinks it's time for EMC to get rid of Documentum.

The 451 Research Director has published a well-sourced six page paper making his case, and it’s a good one -- namely, that EMC and EMC IIG (the group that owns Documentum) make neither beautiful music nor buckets of cash working together.

In the paper. he writes:

At 451 Research, we believe it's time for EMC to divorce itself of IIG, a product division that never really fit into EMC as a whole, and has continued to disappoint CEO Joe Tucci. There are two very good companies here, the storage and cloud giant EMC, and the business application wannabe IIG, aka Documentum. Both groups are trying to do the right thing, but find themselves pulling in different directions."

Open Source + EMC Documentum + Cloud = You Tell Us

Shhh ... don’t tell, but the news is out on the web: EMC has released a new Documentum developer edition and it includes open source components. Not just that, but anyone -- not just EMC customers -- can download it for free. 

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Though it was announced last month in a blog post on EMC's community developer network page, we have yet to see a press release or single news article about it, which is surprising for such a big deal.

You would think EMC would want people to know.

Pivotal Stakes a Claim on Computing's 3rd Era

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Just before Pivotal CEO Paul Maritz left his former job at VMWare, he gave what might be called an “I have a dream” speech. He began by acknowledging that the Software Defined Data Center marketplace didn’t belong to VMware alone, and ended it with a vision for a company that he had yet to build:

"The story of how application development, deployment and operations is going to be reinvented is just as compelling, just as important, but has not been written. The participants in the creation of this story do not know how it will end.”

That company is Pivotal and every step it takes, every move it makes takes it closer to realizing Maritz’s vision.

OpenText Wants to Shut the Box

Talk about a roller coaster. The last two weeks have been full of highs and lows for Box co-founder and CEO Aaron Levie.

Last Monday, Box filed its S-1 on its way to an IPO.  Instead of elation, most market watchers reacted with shock — and not the good kind. The Enterprise File Sync and Share (EFSS) company revealed losses of $168 million on revenue of $124 million. Even those who adore Levie called those stats “horrific”.

On Wednesday, Box held its first developers conference boxdev — Levie’s big shot supporters, like former Microsoft Windows’ chief Steven Sinofsky, were there, as well as VC’s  like Jerry Chen of Greylock Partners, Ben Horowitz of Andreessen Horowitz, Mamoon Hamid General Partner — The Social+Capital Partnership, and several others. And the developers building solutions on top of Box’s platform were there for the lovefest as well. Levie was clearly king for a day.

But then Friday Box rival, Dropbox, revealed it had just purchased Readmill, a German company whose collaborative and social features could provide Dropbox with the same functionalities as Box’s Box View, which it announced at boxdev.

And then late last night OpenText, one of the top companies in the Enterprise Information Management space, announced it was seeking preliminary and permanent injunctions halting the sale of Box's products in connection with an ongoing patent infringement lawsuit.

Will Box Developers Make @Levie King?

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You could sense the excitement around Box’s first developers conference before it even began — there was an all-star line-up of venture capitalists, tech executives and, of course, Box’s own CEO, Aaron Levie on the agenda. The night before there was a picture of Levie rehearsing his keynote, in what looked to be peach-colored pants posted on Instagram (they were not Khakis).

A Box employee had put up a tweet that links to a funny, old video of former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer shouting “developers, developers, developers” while sweating. He was taunting Levie that he would be calling Box developers to action in the very same way the following day.

No matter what you could point to, it was clear that yesterday was planned to be a big, potentially pivotal day for Box. A pivot which could move the company beyond its present status as cloud-based file sync and share provider to that of a platform vendor for computing’s next era.

Will the Box Bubble Start Deflating Now?

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Everyone seems to love Box, whether they use the cloud sync and storage company’s products or not.

Aaron Levie, the company’s co-founder and CEO, seems to be the perfect front man for a generation of digital natives that refuses to be tethered to their desks, to be told where to keep their “things” or to be asked to tone it down when they know it is their birthright to be bold.

More than eight years ago, Levie and his high school buddies stepped outside of their dorm rooms and committed their brains, their energies and their brawn to build a service that provides companies and individuals with the ability to store and synchronize their documents and other content in the cloud which they can later access from anywhere, at any time, via (almost) any device.

Their timing was perfect — within a few short years mobile devices emerged as our windows to the world and everyone wanted to keep their documents, and other content in the Cloud.

Box quickly became one of the most talked about companies in Silicon Valley.

That hasn’t changed. In fact the chatter just got louder.

Yesterday, via Twitter, Levie announced that Box was filing an initial public offering.

Is Box Really All That?

Levie's Socks.jpgAll eyes are on Box as the world waits for the file sync and share startup to reveal its financials in preparation for its pre-IPO road show.

Today, at SXSW, Box CEO Aaron Levie revealed that Ashton Kutcher (yes, the Ashton Kutcher) and Guy Oseary (Madonna’s manager) have invested in his company. The investment happened in December, but why announce it then when you can do it just before IPO-time?

Opportune, no?

On Friday Bloomberg reported that the company plans to make its prospectus public in the next few weeks.

Exclusive: EMC Syncplicity is About to Cozy Up to SharePoint #SPC14

Some cloud-based file sync and share vendors bill themselves as replacements for SharePoint. Syncplicity isn’t one of them.

The rockin’ hot EMC subsidiary has all of the good things that great start-ups are known for, plus a keen understanding of how enterprises operate and their requirements.

EMC's RSA Chief Calls Cybersecurity Experts to Action

EMC's RSA Chief Calls Cybersecurity Experts to ActionWhen RSA chief Art Coviello opened RSA’s information security conference earlier this week, there was an elephant room.

The elephant? Allegation(s) that his company had provided an NSA designed “back door” in its BSafe software which made it easy for the agency to decrypt information that RSA’s encryption software was supposed to keep private.

My Hadoop is Better Than Yours: It's MapR's Turn #strata

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The commercial vendors behind Hadoop don’t actually taunt each other in the press, but they do say things like we’re the only…we don’t do that… they’re doing this…

Of course each of them has to differentiate themselves from the next and show potential customers why their branded commercial Hadoop distribution is not only fast, but also Enterprise-grade, secured and flexible.

Big Data Bits: The Land of Opportunity Is Getting Crowded

Big Data Bits: The Land of Opportunity Is Getting CrowdedIt’s hard to believe that only three years ago “big data” seemed like a strange term. I remember sitting in a crowded room at GigaOm’s first New York Structure Conference at Chelsea Piers listening to a bunch of bigwigs debate what the massive amount of data we were accumulating quickly would eventually be called.

“I hope it’s not big data,” one of them said -- I think it may have been Om Malik. It seemed as if the term was being used “temporarily” until someone came up with something better.

Needless to say, it stuck. 

EMC Syncplicity's New Mobile Face: Beautiful, Brainy, Impenetrable

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The enterprise file sync and share market is jam-packed with vendors. If we were to write an article every time one of them makes a tweak, there wouldn’t be enough time to do anything else. So needless to say, we’re not going that route.

However, when one of the vendors that dominates or is disrupting the space does something interesting, we think it’s worth bringing to your attention.

EMC Syncplicity wins time on the center stage today with its new Mobile First strategy. And no, we’re not talking about skinning a desktop experience onto an iPhone or iPad and changing the way the icons look — but literally changing the way you work. Syncplicity’s new app helps you work smarter, more collaboratively and faster.

With $1B Acquisition, OpenText Swimming for Big B2B Integration Fish

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We now know OpenText’s Information Exchange portfolio was beefed up when it bought GXS for $1 billion this month. But how much better did it get? Who is OpenText going after — and where are they now in this space?

First things first — this is a serious acquisition for the now 8,200-employee Waterloo, Ontario-based enterprise information management software provider. Its investment into GXS represents about a third of the total price for nearly 50 previous acquisitions during the past 20 years.  

The move is so significant, one industry analyst said, that she now puts OpenText ahead of IBM and TIBCO, two of its major competitors in the B2B integration services space. TIBCO offers “B2B Next,” and IBM has "Sterling B2B Integrator."

"OpenText’s Information Exchange portfolio was somewhat limited in its capabilities, so this acquisition will greatly increase its capabilities, putting it ahead of IBM and TIBCO," Sue Clarke, senior analyst at Ovum Research, told CMSWire.

EMC IIG Just Built Something Brand Spankin' New

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Walk into an enterprise conference room, say the word “archive” and everyone will duck out the door — unless they're lawyers, policymakers or paranoid. OK, maybe a few anal-retentive folks from IT and records management will stick around, especially if there’s a new product or service being introduced or rumors of an investigation.

Though the latter is the last thing anyone wants, it may be the only times these hard-working, too often unsung, archiving heroes see the fruits of their labor pay off.

After all, it’s because of their hard work that the CEOs who employ them can locate and easily access the critical documents and data they need to keep themselves and their companies out of trouble should questions of negligence, misrepresentation or wrong doing ever arrive.

So let's talk about what EMC is doing about this.

CMSWire's Top 10 Hits of 2013: Big Data

Top 10

Yes, Big Data was a Big Buzzword in 2013. The technology and business press — and even mainstream media — got a piece of the action, churning out article after article about what Big Data means to you. And that's part of the problem. Big Data means lots of things to lots of people.

It might be better to think of big data as big analysis, because that's really what's happening here. It's not about the data itself, but about analyzing the data to gain insights and business value, across industries and verticals. CMSWire has kept you up-to-date on the big data trend all year — and here are our Top 10 big data stories of the year.

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