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Joe Shepley News & Analysis

Information Management Will Never Be Easy

2014-14-July-Obstacle-Course.jpgI get the opportunity to speak with hundreds of folks a year about managing information at organizations, and probably the most common requirement I hear is, information management needs to be easy and user friendly -- if users have to do anything more difficult than what they do now, it will fail.

It’s difficult to formulate a response to this request (or even keep a straight face). The idea that somehow you could go from managing corporate information horribly to managing it well and have it be perceived by end users as easy is pretty astounding.

Before all the UI/UX folks out there break out the pitchforks and torches, let me explain what I mean and why.

Enterprise Content Management Isn't Dead - It's Evolving

There’s lots of talk about how Enterprise Content Management (ECM) is dead or dying. Some say it’s a vendor category coined to give a name to bloated, one-size-fits-all software products that eschewed a real understanding of user requirements in favor of a Swiss Army Knife approach that sought to be everything to everybody -- and wound up being truly useful only to a handful.

Others say that it’s a specialist creation, coined by consultants and industry talking heads to make it easier to promote their own expertise, drum up traffic for their blogs, and sell more services to clients.

Yet others say that ECM is a once-useful domain that’s outlived its usefulness. It made sense once upon a time, but the new modes of content creation, sharing and consumption have made it obsolete alongside systems of engagement and record, information lifecycle management and the rest.

Finding Common Ground with Information Governance

2014-27-May-Joint-Meeting.jpgIf you've been at an organization where compliance, IT and the business seem to speak different languages when they talk about information management, you know how difficult it is to get them all on the same page. The task is so difficult at most organizations that each typically does their own work -- blinders on -- in isolation from one or both of the other two in an effort to simply get something done. The results for the organization range from less than optimal (wasted time and money) to disastrous (smoking crater fines/penalties and massive operational disruptions).

When working with clients, I liken this state of affairs to whatever the political debate du jour is on the news -- where both sides are seemingly speaking different languages and there’s no agreement on the common ground.

The SharePoint Information Governance Problem

The SharePoint Information Governance ProblemIf you have any experience with SharePoint as a document management platform today, you know that most organizations struggle to use it effectively. You’re also likely familiar with the negative impacts that typically result from using SharePoint ineffectively: a proliferation of sites, often on a proliferation of SharePoint versions, with no clear standards on what documents should (and shouldn’t) be stored there or how, no clear guidelines for users on how to classify their documents, little to no capabilities for promoting effective information lifecycle management, little to no end user governance or oversight for things like site and document library structures, security and access settings, or document hygiene, and dozens, hundreds or even thousands of orphaned sites that, taken together, represent a digital landfill of staggering proportions.

You're Getting Information Management Wrong

You're Getting Information Management WrongSince paper free in ’93, we’ve heard that we’re on the cusp of solving the information management (IM) problem, yet time and time again we keep getting it wrong and dashing all those high hopes in the process. So what’s going on?

Top Down vs. Bottoms Up Information Management

Top Down vs. Bottoms Up Information ManagementWe've already established what makes a good information management (IM) business case from a high level, i.e., addressing meaningful business value rather than “save everyone time searching for documents.” But the devil’s in the details, so I want to dig down a bit more to give you all more specific guidance on building an effective IM business case.

The Business Case for Information Management

The Business Case for Information ManagementOther than not really understanding what information management is, the single biggest obstacle to information management at most organizations is the lack of a viable business case: if you can’t show your CXOs the money, they’re not going to support your efforts. They have a whole portfolio of projects to choose from that generate revenue, reduce costs or increase margins, so if you can’t articulate how information management does one or more of these, you stand little chance of success.

Nobody Really Cares about Information Management

Given the mind-numbing ubiquity of big data, intelligent analytics, the semantic web, blah blah blah, the title of this post may seem not only overly provocative but outright wrong. And while it definitely is the first, it most certainly is not the second.

SharePoint Will (Almost) Never Be Your Sole ECM System

This topic has to some degree been a theme in many of my posts over the last 18 months, but given how often I'm asked to speak to this in my day-to-day travels -- and given the amount of churn it causes among us pundits and prognosticators on both sides of the fence -- I figured I'd address it head on here in a single post.

The Evolution of SharePoint: It's Not Your Sole Enterprise CMS

sharepoint 2103, enterprise content management, eim, information management, ecm

As SharePoint evolves, how will its position change within the organization? How do Yammer and Office 365 change our view of SharePoint

SharePoint or No, Organizations Need to Rethink Approach to Records Management

In the last post, I called it like I seen it: SharePoint out of the box can’t do records management. 2007, 2010, 2013 -- none of ‘em left to their own devices are worth much when it comes to automating the retention and (more importantly) disposition of your records according to the retention schedule.

You Can't Do Records Management in SharePoint

Let’s start this admittedly provocative post with a question: Anybody out there actually doing records management in SharePoint?

SharePoint is the New SAP

Let’s face it, no matter how you slice it, SharePoint has been a big success: for Microsoft (78 percent of enterprises currently running SharePoint according to AIIM), for end users (finally some technology they could relate to), and for the enterprise content management (ECM) community (at last, people were somewhat excited about what we do for a living). 

SharePoint Applications: Communication, Training and Go Live

shutterstock_50194075.jpgI’m at the end of a series on how to build and deploy successful SharePoint document management applications, with the goal of migrating end-users off of the most prevalent legacy document management system out there: that unholy trinity of shared drives, hard drives and email.

SharePoint Applications: Migration Planning

shutterstock_85845541.jpg

I’m in the middle of a series on how to build and deploy successful SharePoint document management applications, with the goal of migrating end-users off of the most prevalent legacy document management system out there: that unholy trinity of shared drives, hard drives, and email.

In this post, we’ll dive deeper into migration planning, one of the most challenging parts of the process.

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