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Mapr News & Analysis

MapR, Teradata Ink Deal, Bad Timing for Hortonworks?

Teradata now has a flavor of Hadoop for everyone.

This morning Hadoop distro provider MapR and Teradata, the big data analytics and marketing applications company, announced that they have expanded their partnership. What it comes down to, in the simplest possible terms, is that the companies will work together to integrate and co-develop their joint products and to create a unified go to market strategy,

Teradata will also be able to resell MapR software, professional services, and provide customer support.

In other words, Teradata will be the face of MapR to enterprises who use, or want to use, both technologies.

The Market Likes Hortonworks' IPO Filing

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In one sense the timing of Hortonworks IPO filing couldn’t have been better. It came on Monday, just a week after Forrester analyst Mike Gualtieri said that Hadoop in the enterprise was no longer optional.

“The jury is in. Hadoop has been found not guilty of being an over-hyped open source platform. Hadoop has proven real enterprise value in any number of use cases including data lakes, traditional and advanced analytics,” he wrote in his Forrester blog.

He went on to say that the dazed and confused CIOs who haven’t had Hadoop on their agendas thus far will get with the program in 2015.

So if you’re one of the three independent commercial vendors providing software and support for the open source big data muncher, it’s highly likely that your business is going to take off. Especially because there’s not an analyst, or even a competitor, we can find who thinks Hadoop is a winner-takes-all-market.

And it’s a big market.

Is the Hadoop Market Ready to Go? Hortonworks Filed its IPO

OK Cloudera, you say the world’s only commercial pure Open Source Hadoop distro provider, Hortonworks, doesn’t have a sustainable business model?

Well, let’s see Wall St. thinks.

Today, the company unveiled news that it confidentially filed its S-1 with the US Securities and Exchange Commission in August under the auspices of the JOBS Act. Form S-1 is used by companies planning on going public to register their securities with the SEC.

While many think that IPO’s are about founders cashing in on their blood sweat and tears, you can bet that Hortonworks is raising money for one specific reason — namely, to get the capital it needs to become the world’s predominant enterprise Hadoop provider.

Big Data Bits: It's Free, Be Happy Edition

We’re not covering the cloud, containers or the Hadoop wars this week. Instead we’re appealing to your sense of adventure and curiosity by pointing you to some things you might want to check out, in case you missed them. Now you can have fun without spending a dime!

If Hadoop Disappears, Will the Label on Your Distro Matter?

2014-24-October-Elephant-Family.jpgIn the next year we’ll see Hadoop disappear, so said Cloudera co-founder and chief strategy officer Mike Olson in his keynote at the O’Reilly Strata + Hadoop World conference last week.

Olson has a way of saying things that cause a reaction. Last year it was his introduction of the Enterprise Data Hub that took everyone off guard, and this year it’s the promise that the big data muncher named after an elephant in a storybook will practically vanish from the line of sight of all but a few geeks.

You’d think that if it were invisible and it was all open source then the brand of Hadoop used might not matter so much.

Faking Big Data #strataconf

Sorry folks, but this shouldn’t come as too big of a surprise. Anytime a new technology or field emerges, so does a group of posers. They’re typically software vendors, consulting firms and “experts” who claim to be able to help you cross the chasm between where you are and where you need to go to remain viable in the future.

These aren’t, for the most part, evil companies, snake oil salesman or under educated individuals. Vendors iterate products as quickly as they can and push them out too early, they take shortcuts and rationalize them and sometimes they simply don’t know that they don’t know what they’re doing.

Big data is still an emerging field.

Does Cloudera Need to Cool It?

2014-22-September-Elephant-Fight.jpgA staple gun or roll of masking tape might come in handy today when Amr Awadallah walks in through his company’s doors. The CTO and co-founder of Hadoop platform provider Cloudera mouthed off about the competition to the European press late last week inspiring tweets like “Elephant fight!” The elephant reference, for anyone who may not know, refers to the symbol used for Apache Open Source Hadoop.

Are Hortonworks + Hive Community Paving Hadoop's Future?

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Marry a big vision and a vibrant open source community and you’ll get something pretty special. In this case we’re talking about delivery on the Stinger initiative, which teamed engineers from Hadoop distro provider Hortonworks with more than 140 developers to advance interactive SQL querying ability on Apache Hive at scale in pure open source.

The initiative, which was completed in April, brought together over 390,000 lines of code contributed by developers from 44 companies, to provide business analysts and data workers with one powerful engine for SQL queries on big data sets at speed and at petabyte scale.

It does something that other big data solutions like it do not do: it gives users a single, simple tool to use for either interactive or batch processing.

Big Data Bits: Big Data Smarts

Yesterday Salesforce completed its acquisition of RelateIQ, a startup that combines CRM and data science to get the right messages to the right person at the right time. The sales price was $392,133,512 -- not bad for a company that was founded three years ago.

While much was reported when the sale was first announced, little has been said as to what happens next, other than Salesforce gaining improved big data, data science and analytic capabilities.

Yesterday VentureBeat wrote, without identifying its source, that Salesforce would create an R&D division, Salesforce X, where RelateIQ’s data scientists would work.

Not a bad idea considering that RelateIQ’s Chief Technology officer, DJ Patil, was named one of the 7 most powerful data scientists in the world by Forbes magazine, and is credited (along with Jeff Hammerbacher) to have coined the term “data scientist”.

Patil’s team members aren’t slackers either. Rusian Belkin, Twitter’s former VP Engineering, Search and Content, leads Engineering at RealateIQ. And then there’s Daniel Francisco, Relate IQ’s Manager of Product, he was Chief of Staff and Product Manager at Linkedin.

Even if the Salesforce X rumor is wrong, it’s a good idea. So how about it, Mr. Benioff? You have one of the best data teams in the world working for you and chances are good that they’re more into doing interesting work than money. The latter of which they probably have plenty of because all of the successful startups they’ve worked at.

Big Data Bits: Big Data Empowered

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The analysts say that big data is maturing, that we’re no longer in an investigative mode and that instead we’re getting busy. Big vendors are buying start-ups to extend capabilities to their customers, we’re starting to run Hadoop on the Cloud, we’re using new databases to power activities we wouldn’t have dreamed of in the past, and so on. Want to know more? Read on … 

Will MapR Be the First Hadoop Vendor to IPO?

2014-30-June-Wall-Street-Bull.jpgGoogle Capital doesn’t invest in that many companies, in fact, before today there were only six.

And when do they invest, they’re hardly silent partners.

“We have the capability to use our money, our time, our effort, our expertise, our brain power, and the Google brand to help build great companies,” said David Drummond, chairman of Google Capital. Drummond is also Google’s senior vice president, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer.

While that statement doesn’t tell us much about how quickly Google Capital expects to realize a return on its investments, the particular partner they assign to a startup may be telling.

This morning Gene Frantz, a general partner at Google Ventures, who specializes in late stage startups, takes a seat on MapR’s board.

MapR, for anyone who doesn’t already know, is a San Jose, Calif.-based enterprise software company that develops and sells Apache Hadoop-derived software.

What's Cooler Than Beats Music Using MapR? #HadoopSummit

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We all know streaming music is a big thing — people no longer get excited about building playlists or hitting shuffle on their iPods only to hear the same tired tunes over and over again.

Today we want to listen to crowd-sourced, curated music that’s selected specifically for us. And services that can provide that need to process and crunch lots of data (demographic, psychographic, mobile, social …), big data and to then apply predictive analytics to determine what might delight us.

While providers like Spotify and Pandora have been doing that for quite some time, Beats Music recently came out of nowhere and disrupted the scene — so much so that Apple bought it (and Beats Electronics) from Jimmy Iovine and Dr. Dre.

Now we’re not going to tell you that either of those music moguls knows a lot about big data (they could, but we sort of doubt it). But we do know this: Beats Music uses MapR for its big data needs.

Why Hortonworks' Hadoop Pitch May Be Perfect

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Hortonworks business strategy certainly has its naysayers. They claim the venture capital backed company won’t be able to generate the kind of revenues Wall Street investors expect without selling proprietary software that compliments or extends open source Apache Hadoop or any other open source software, for that matter.

This sort of talk falls on deaf ears at Hortonworks.

“Our strategy is to build out (Hadoop and Hortonworks Data Platform aka HDP) in open source so that it resonates and deeply increases value for our partners, our customers and for us,“ said Shaun Connolly, vice president of Corporate Strategy at Hortonworks.

MapR Ups Its Hadoop Game with Databricks' Spark

For now, MapR seems to be sitting on the sidelines of the “My Hadoop distro is better than yours” game, and as Jack Norris, the company’s CMO puts it, “we’re concentrating on doing what’s best for our customers.” (Who wouldn’t say something similar?)

It’s with that in mind that they announced today the addition of the Apache Spark stack to their distribution. Norris says Spark will add speed, programming ease and real time processing abilities to their current offering. 

Big Data Crawls Out of the Trough in 2014 #GigaOmLive

chelsea piers

If you’ve followed the big data hype long enough, you know that every year -- since 2011 -- was supposed to be big data’s big year. And that at the end of every year since, the pundits have said “It didn’t happen this year. Next year will be big data’s big year.” 

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