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Social Business, Social Enterprise News, Analysis

Week in Review: DAM in 2015 + Information Governance

Looking Through DAM Lens
Two views: DAM's goals in 2015 and beyond.

Where the Mobile March Leads
Time to catch up -- and mobile comes first.

Simply Irresistible?
Microsoft wants to be the digital go-to.

Making Social More Social
Social needs a little face time.

Call for Strategic Governance
Information management needs governance.

IT -- College Degree Required?
What are the educational prerequisites for tech? 

Buyer's Guide: Selecting a CMS that Supports Your Business 
Key insights and current trends to guide you through the buying process.

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Pitfalls of Enterprise Collaboration (and the Solutions)

Collaboration today is critical for any organization’s success. Organizations are becoming more geographically distributed, and though there are some exceptions such as Google and Yahoo, most organizations have no choice in the matter.

Although research claims collaboration works better if teams are all together, there is also the 50 yard rule -- anyone over 50 yards from you will collaborate with you in the same way as they would in a distributed office. Architects are working to create more collaborative physical spaces in organizations to maximize casual serendipitous interactions. Yet most organizations have not worked out how to collaborate face to face, let alone distributed collaboration. Let's look at the most common collaboration and distributed collaboration problems, identify a solution and explore specific actions.

Why does collaboration fail so often? It’s simple: people can’t make the mental shift!

Do You Really Need a College Degree to Work in IT?

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Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer is known for her insistence on hiring employees with stellar college credentials. She even reportedly turned down actress Gwyneth Paltrow for an editing job with Yahoo for that reason, according to The New York Times. Paltrow is also the author of cookbooks and head of the lifestyle blog Goop—making her a natural fit, it would seem, to be a contributing editor of Yahoo Food.

Mayer "balked" at hiring Paltrow, though, according to the Times, because she "disapproved of the fact that Paltrow did not graduate college." According to the Times, Mayer "habitually asked deputies where they attended college."

Mayer might be taking her views on education to the extreme with Paltrow, but surely this opinion is appropriate for the numerous tech jobs that are filled at Yahoo every year. Right?

Not necessarily, say some in the industry. Granted, certain positions that require engineering skills, for example, call for not only a degree but advanced education as well. 

Glip Releases Asana Integration, Tackles 'Email Overload'

Less email, less stress, better collaboration.

Social enterprise collaboration platforms push this theme regularly. Some think email is dead. Others don't. It's a pot-stirrer in tech, no doubt.

Boca Raton, Fla.-based startup Glip is right in the thick of it, like hundreds of other social collaboration platforms. Does Glip expect companies to completely move away from email? Patrick Carmitchel, product evangelist for Glip, referred to this digital agency in a Glip promotional video that is "completely rejecting" email.

Q1 Planning: Top Marketing Technology, Social Business Conferences & Events (08-Jan-15)

Our industry event planner gives you the heads-up on what key industry events are coming around the corner. If we've missed something, don't hesitate to add your event to the list. (You can also view the full calendar here.)

You're Invited: Total Economic Impact of a Workflow Automation Solution

Join CMSWire and Nintex on January 13th for a one-hour webinar to explore a Forrester study on effective workflow automation results.

> Register Now

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Making Social Business More Social #CES2015

Social business tools don't always live up to their promises of effective, real time, collaborative communication.

Yammer may look a bit like Facebook, but not everyone is comfortable working in groups on Facebook. Conference calls are useful, if you get past the garbled voices. And while Google Docs are convenient and compatible with many programs, many users also find their functionality somewhat limited.

What's really missing is the "social" aspect of social business. It's typically a lot more fun -- and potentially more productive -- to collaborate face-to-face with your coworkers . Of course, that isn't always possible when colleagues on the same teams may work thousands of miles apart.

Build Better Knowledge Management

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Long before Google Glass wearers made the news (and became pariahs within San Francisco-area coffee houses and restaurants), research projects at huge companies like IBM and Microsoft sought to bridge the gap between the capture and storage of corporate knowledge and intellectual property, and the difficult-to-archive individual narrative that attempted to make sense of this important, yet mostly disconnected content.

The effort of transcribing a personal experience or individual learning in context to our projects, business initiatives and other corporate artifacts (e.g., presentations, documents, spreadsheets) is incredibly difficult to accomplish in a way that can then be utilized by our knowledge management systems.

The problem with knowledge management (KM) is not a matter of data infrastructure -- whether your data resides on premises, in servers that you manage versus out in the cloud is irrelevant (to some degree) to the argument -- but with a user experience that fails to align the needs of the complex, non-linear playback mechanisms of the human brain with our systems of record.

Segway Inventor Dean Kamen: Science Isn't a Spectator Sport

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Dean Kamen has invented hundreds of things, including the first insulin pump for treatment of diabetes. But he'll probably be forever known as The Segway Guy.

Kamen made his fortune developing medical devices, but gained worldwide recognition in 2001 when he unveiled his Segway Personal Transporter. At the time, Kamen predicted the Segway would have an impact on society similar to that of the personal computer.

And while that claim remains debatable, the Segway has made significant inroads in niche markets. It's gained acceptance in police departments, military bases, warehouses, corporate campuses and industrial sites — despite the highly publicized and unfortunate device related death of the British tycoon who bought the company in 2009. The man, Jim Heselden, 62, accidentally steered the Segway off a 30-foot cliff and into a river while riding on his estate, about 140 miles from London.

But let's get back to Kamen, whose resume extends far beyond the Segway. The son of an illustrator for Mad Magazine and Weird Science, Kamen is an inventor, an entrepreneur and an autodidact who advocates for science and technology.

Building a Digital Workplace with Office 365

Our workday world has changed dramatically with the advent of always on internet access and the explosion of mobile devices in the enterprise. Employees are no longer tethered to their desks in office buildings but are in the field working face to face with clients and customers. Microsoft’s vision for the future of work is made up of the Cloud OS (Office 365) and the mobile devices you use every day to get work done. The intersection between the two is the digital workplace.

3 Ways to Build a High-Performance Learning Organization

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We’ve heard it over and over again. Companies must be agile in order to innovate. They need to make quick decisions in order to survive.

So, why is Edward D. Hess, business consultant and author, telling us to slow down? Author of the book Learn or Die: Using Science to Build a Leading-Edge Learning Organization, he claims it all comes down to learning.

Social Collaboration Software: 2 Leaders Emerge in Rankings

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As we welcome 2015, it's clear that enterprise collaboration software is a booming market.

And if you look to three organizations that provide software rankings in this space, two leaders emerge across the whole rankings landscape: Microsoft and Salesforce.

Only Microsoft's social enterprise collaboration offerings and Salesforce Chatter and Communities got leaders citations in all three organizations we checked: Forrester Research, Gartner Research and G2 Crowd, the latter of which just released this week. 

Several collaboration offerings got cited by more than one org, but only Microsoft and Salesforce got the nod from all three.

CMSWire's Top 10 Social Business Stories of 2014

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What social business stories intrigued readers in 2014? Technology stories about what is working — and what is not — were popular, not surprisingly.

Readers also gravitated to articles that examined deeper trends underway in the workforce. But why listen to me rehash these themes when you can read them first hand yourself?

CMSWire's Top 10 Hits of 2014: Information Management

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The problem about information management is that, in reality, there is little management around most enterprise’s information. New technologies enter the market, old ones are upgraded and the mass of information that is contained in enterprise silos just keeps getting bigger.

Leaving aside the big data space in 2014, which we look at elsewhere, there were a number of initiatives over the year that caught the attention of a lot of people, even if the information management space is just as chaotic as it was at the beginning of the year.

A Look Back: Making Sense of Social Business Trends

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2014 wasn't the year Facebook staked an unshakeable claim for the hearts and minds of brands and consumers. By the time Jan. 1, 2014 dawned, that had already happened.

2014 also wasn't the year that companies became savvy in their use of social media to promote products. Corporates had been there, done that.

Nor was 2014 the year when mobile became a tour de force or the Internet of Things become more reality than theory or collaboration technologies began to offer deep value-add to firms. All of those trends were already underway and headed for true north.

Rather, 2014 was the year this whole wondrous mix of technologies, developments and strategies came together in a coherent approach under the vague umbrella of social business. And come together they did.

CMSWire Top Contributors 2014 - Jed Cawthorne

2014-22-December-Jed-Cawthorne.jpgJed Cawthorne describes himself as an enterprise information management, enterprise content management and collaboration evangelist. His goals are to improve information sharing, process management, content management and social collaboration to create 'knowledge enabled' organizations. In addition to teaching Information Management part-time at University of Toronto, Jed keeps busy with projects for the Legal, Compliance and Investigations & Security teams — as well as writing inspiring posts for CMSWire readers.

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