HOT TOPICS: Customer Experience Marketing Automation Social Business SharePoint 2013 Document Management Big Data Mobile DAM

Virginia Backaitis News & Analysis

Your Crib Sheet for Microsoft's World of Data

2014-17-April-data-culture

When Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella and his data team took the stage in San Francisco on Wednesday to talk about the company’s strategy, they used a few terms that are not yet in the vernacular. But they soon will be.

And while you’re certainly welcome to figure out what they are and, more importantly, what they mean once you hear them, we figure that, at least some of readers, will want to be among the first to use them.

Why Microsoft's Reign Will Continue

Leave it to Box CEO and chief Microsoft critic Aaron Levie to spread the word, check out his tweet yesterday:

Obviously Levie was tuned into the same Microsoft Customer data event as we were, and we agree with his conclusion -- Microsoft has an impressive (data) play.

Dream On Salesforce, SAP Prez Unimpressed by Your Threats

Dream On Salesforce, SAP Prez Unimpressed by Your ThreatsSAP is too classy to laugh at Salesforce president Keith Block’s pretentious remarks, as he runs from city to city saying things like “You’re going down SAP.”

“It's great that Salesforce.com has aspirations to be bigger than SAP,” said Steve Lucas, president, SAP Platform Solutions. “But ultimately we don't care what competitors think, we only care about what our customers and partners think and how to make them successful.”

“If we stick to that,” added Lucas, “we will win.” 

MapR Ups Its Hadoop Game with Databricks' Spark

For now, MapR seems to be sitting on the sidelines of the “My Hadoop distro is better than yours” game, and as Jack Norris, the company’s CMO puts it, “we’re concentrating on doing what’s best for our customers.” (Who wouldn’t say something similar?)

It’s with that in mind that they announced today the addition of the Apache Spark stack to their distribution. Norris says Spark will add speed, programming ease and real time processing abilities to their current offering. 

Dropbox's Enterprise Invasion Starts Now

And there’s a prize inside …

Hey CIO, you can stop pulling out your hair, Dropbox is going to help you gain control of your rogue company files.

There’s no one that can do this the way Dropbox can -- they claim 275 million (passionate) users.

Reporting for Duty at Bloomfire: New CEO Bob Zukis

2014-08-April-Bob-Zukis.jpg

Want to watch someone walk their talk? Then keep your eyes on Bob Zukis.

Zukis is the author of Social Inc., a book that claims Business is the next social opportunity — and it's worth trillions of dollars.

Beginning this morning, he’ll have a chance to prove it when he takes the helm at Bloomfire, a start-up that aims to revolutionize the Enterprise through its knowledge sharing and social collaboration platform.

For those who aren’t yet familiar with Bloomfire, it was launched nearly two years ago at SXSW in Austin, Texas, where the company also happens to be based.

Teradata's Big Data Play Changes the Game #TDUniv

2014-07-April-Prague

Everything Teradata does centers around one thing — helping its customers get knowledge and value out of their data. It’s been that way since 1979 and it’s not likely change, even as the kinds of data and the ways of wrangling it do.

“Everyone wants to outsmart the competition,” said Imad Birouty, program marketing manager at Teradata.  That’s why Teradata boasts that it continuously innovates to empower its customers with the technology, analytics and tools they need to make that happen.

Big or fast, structured, unstructured or semi-structured, whether it comes from the Internet of Things (IoT) or an enterprise resource planning system, Teradata gets data and it's got you covered. The company brings logic and order to data, no matter how great its volume, velocity or variability or where it lives, in Hadoop or a data warehouse. Not only that, but flexibility is built into Teradata technologies to accommodate users with varying skill sets and developers with their choices of languages and tools.

This morning at Teradata Universe in Prague, Teradata announces three game-changing innovations that deliver unprecedented analytic power, breakthrough speed for analytics, and cross the big data chasm.

Will EMC Dump Documentum?

Alan Pelz-Sharpe thinks it's time for EMC to get rid of Documentum.

The 451 Research Director has published a well-sourced six page paper making his case, and it’s a good one -- namely, that EMC and EMC IIG (the group that owns Documentum) make neither beautiful music nor buckets of cash working together.

In the paper. he writes:

At 451 Research, we believe it's time for EMC to divorce itself of IIG, a product division that never really fit into EMC as a whole, and has continued to disappoint CEO Joe Tucci. There are two very good companies here, the storage and cloud giant EMC, and the business application wannabe IIG, aka Documentum. Both groups are trying to do the right thing, but find themselves pulling in different directions."

Cloudera's Got a Big Data App Store (Sort of)

We can’t remind you often enough that Apache Hadoop is still an emerging technology. Not just that, but that it takes education, training, time and experience to build tools that work with it.

In a world where carpetbaggers sell training courses that teach you to master Hadoop in a day, it’s no wonder that there are cowboys who actually believe that the tools that they’ve built work like a charm.

And that there are Enterprises that buy them.

Who gets the blame when they fail? Everyone, the tool provider, the underlying technology, and the Big Data industry in general.

Open Source + EMC Documentum + Cloud = You Tell Us

Shhh ... don’t tell, but the news is out on the web: EMC has released a new Documentum developer edition and it includes open source components. Not just that, but anyone -- not just EMC customers -- can download it for free. 

pfitzner documentum.png

Though it was announced last month in a blog post on EMC's community developer network page, we have yet to see a press release or single news article about it, which is surprising for such a big deal.

You would think EMC would want people to know.

Pivotal Stakes a Claim on Computing's 3rd Era

2014-April-02-Paul-Maritz

Just before Pivotal CEO Paul Maritz left his former job at VMWare, he gave what might be called an “I have a dream” speech. He began by acknowledging that the Software Defined Data Center marketplace didn’t belong to VMware alone, and ended it with a vision for a company that he had yet to build:

"The story of how application development, deployment and operations is going to be reinvented is just as compelling, just as important, but has not been written. The participants in the creation of this story do not know how it will end.”

That company is Pivotal and every step it takes, every move it makes takes it closer to realizing Maritz’s vision.

Intel + Cloudera + $ 900M = The Future of Computing?

Even Amazon Web Services sage Werner Vogels is impressed with Cloudera’s partnership with Intel and the 900 M it has raised in the last week.

The future of the data center and computing’s third platform may now belong to Cloudera. Everyone knows it has the money, the investors and the know how to build it.

So do Pivotal and IBM by the way. But it’s worth noting that the three companies may not be offering exactly the same products/services and approaching the market in exactly the same way. In fact, they might not even be after the exact same thing.

In other words, this isn’t a contest between the three vendors, at least not yet anyway. Both Alan Saldich, vice president of Marketing Cloudera and Josh Klahr, vice president, Data Platform Product Management for Pivotal told me, in separate conversations, that the companies do some of the same, but also some different things.

OpenText Wants to Shut the Box

Talk about a roller coaster. The last two weeks have been full of highs and lows for Box co-founder and CEO Aaron Levie.

Last Monday, Box filed its S-1 on its way to an IPO.  Instead of elation, most market watchers reacted with shock — and not the good kind. The Enterprise File Sync and Share (EFSS) company revealed losses of $168 million on revenue of $124 million. Even those who adore Levie called those stats “horrific”.

On Wednesday, Box held its first developers conference boxdev — Levie’s big shot supporters, like former Microsoft Windows’ chief Steven Sinofsky, were there, as well as VC’s  like Jerry Chen of Greylock Partners, Ben Horowitz of Andreessen Horowitz, Mamoon Hamid General Partner — The Social+Capital Partnership, and several others. And the developers building solutions on top of Box’s platform were there for the lovefest as well. Levie was clearly king for a day.

But then Friday Box rival, Dropbox, revealed it had just purchased Readmill, a German company whose collaborative and social features could provide Dropbox with the same functionalities as Box’s Box View, which it announced at boxdev.

And then late last night OpenText, one of the top companies in the Enterprise Information Management space, announced it was seeking preliminary and permanent injunctions halting the sale of Box's products in connection with an ongoing patent infringement lawsuit.

Dropbox Bought Readmill - We Know Why

Or at least we think we know why.

On Friday, as you were heading out for happy hour, we found out that Dropbox had acquired Readmill, a reading app that allows users to do things like highlight passages, take notes and share notes as they read, discuss passages and so on.

Will Box Developers Make @Levie King?

Aaron Levie at Conference.jpg

You could sense the excitement around Box’s first developers conference before it even began — there was an all-star line-up of venture capitalists, tech executives and, of course, Box’s own CEO, Aaron Levie on the agenda. The night before there was a picture of Levie rehearsing his keynote, in what looked to be peach-colored pants posted on Instagram (they were not Khakis).

A Box employee had put up a tweet that links to a funny, old video of former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer shouting “developers, developers, developers” while sweating. He was taunting Levie that he would be calling Box developers to action in the very same way the following day.

No matter what you could point to, it was clear that yesterday was planned to be a big, potentially pivotal day for Box. A pivot which could move the company beyond its present status as cloud-based file sync and share provider to that of a platform vendor for computing’s next era.

Displaying 1-15 of 240 results

< Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Next >