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Analytics News & Analysis

Extracting Insight from Unstructured Data

The pace of digital information has resulted in the world's aggregate data doubling in size in shorter intervals than ever before. According to Gartner, about 80 percent of data held by an organization is unstructured data, made up of information from customer calls, emails and social media feeds. Add to this the large volumes of diagnostic information logged by embedded and user devices. While it's difficult to make a proper analysis from organized data, making sense of unstructured data comes with its own challenges.

Organizations now have to study structured, semi-structured and unstructured data sets to arrive at meaningful business decisions, including determining customer sentiment, cooperating with e-discovery requirements and personalizing offers for their customers.

But while sifting through vast amounts of information can look like a lot of work, it comes with rewards.

Customers Aren't Worried About Data Breaches [Infographic]

2014-20-November-yawn.jpgHere's good news for every company that's careless with personally identifiable information: Your customers apparently don't care.

A new study by global IT association ISACA shows that consumers haven’t changed their shopping behaviors despite a year of retail data breaches — worrisome, the organization maintains, especially with the shopaholic trifecta of Thanksgiving Day, Black Friday and Cyber Monday is just a week away.

It's not that consumers are unaware of the problem. According to the 2014 ISACA IT Risk/Reward Barometer, almost all US consumers (94 percent) have read or heard about major retailer data breaches in the past year. But while three-fourths of those surveyed claim those data breaches have increased their concerns about their personal data privacy, few are doing anything about it.

MapR, Teradata Ink Deal, Bad Timing for Hortonworks?

Teradata now has a flavor of Hadoop for everyone.

This morning Hadoop distro provider MapR and Teradata, the big data analytics and marketing applications company, announced that they have expanded their partnership. What it comes down to, in the simplest possible terms, is that the companies will work together to integrate and co-develop their joint products and to create a unified go to market strategy,

Teradata will also be able to resell MapR software, professional services, and provide customer support.

In other words, Teradata will be the face of MapR to enterprises who use, or want to use, both technologies.

Q4/Q1 Planning: Top Marketing Technology, Social Business Conferences & Events (19-Nov-14)

Our industry event planner gives you the heads-up on what key industry events are coming around the corner. If we've missed something, don't hesitate to add your event to the list. (You can also view the full calendar here.)

You're Invited: Information Governance and Real Customer Successes

Join CMSWire and Opentext on December 2nd for a one-hour webinar with customer success stories on how information governance improved their businesses  


> Register Now

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Making Existing Big Data Investments Work For You

2014-18-November-Unisphere.jpgCIOs and CMOs have stopped talking about big data and data analytics as something they're exploring or planning on looking into in the near future. Analysts and experts rarely, if ever, call big data the "next big thing" any more. Does all this mean big data is over? Just the opposite.

Big data has finally arrived and is quickly maturing. IT leaders are now shifting from thinking about the possibility of making investments in big data platforms to thinking about how to get more out of the investments they’ve already made.

Forget Nielsen, Tubular + Cloudera Get the Scoop on Video

No one watches television anymore.

OK, maybe that’s an overstatement. But follow the youngest set of millennials around and you’ll find they spend more time watching YouTube than anything else. Next, look at what social network they use most often. It’s YouTube, not Facebook. Search engine? YouTube again.

So, if you’re an advertiser or publisher who wants to reach this audience, how do you know what to put in front of them or where to find them. Yesterday’s ratings giants, Nielsen and ComScore are still busy with TV, cable and radio which have nowhere near the volume, variety, variability, veracity or velocity (big data’s v’s) of YouTube and other video hosting sites like it.

How big a disparity is there? Consider this: 3 billion videos are played on YouTube every day and 100 hours of content are uploaded every minute.

What's Trending in Digital Analytics

2014-17-November-Blackboard-Analysis.jpgDuring a walk up Camelback Mountain in Phoenix one recent morning with my colleague Joe Kamenar, Steve Harris, senior director web analytics, web digital group at Capital One and David Millrod, founder of visualization platform Insight Rocket, we talked about data integration. We talked about analytics staffing. We talked about multichannel attribution models. We talked about “huddles.” Huddles? These practitioner-led discussion groups are the heart of XChange, the digital analytics conference we were attending. Now in its eighth year, XChange huddles reflect what’s on the mind of digital analytics program leaders who work at both global and national brand organizations.

Keeping the Customer in Customer Relationships

2014-17-November-Shop-Keep.jpgWith the growth of the online marketplace, sellers are gaining dramatic new ways to get products before a wide, and changing, audience as well as a powerful suite of new tools to understand what is happening in the cyberspace of commerce. Big data and analytics have shown us a new horizon of information about how, and what, e-commerce and its participants are doing or not doing.

But combine the growing reliance on statistical approaches to the marketplace with our penchant to turn everything into an abstract variable that can be managed by more data and more expensive software, and we risk losing touch with the only thing that, in the end, makes any of this worth doing -- the customer.

HP Vertica Makes Hadoop Purr

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Whatever has been said about the way HP runs its business, it’s time to turn the page. CEO Meg Whitman and her team certainly have. Hardware on one side of the street, big data and analytics on the other. There’s no need for one business to stifle the other. Each has the right to think for itself and to act swiftly.

HP’s Vertica team has certainly heard the message, and it hasn’t wasted any time. It's announcing Vertica for SQL on Hadoop today. It’s an analytics platform that enables customers to access and explore data residing in any of the three primary Hadoop distros — Hortonworks, MapR, Cloudera — or any combination thereof.

That’s right, the brand or brands of Hadoop you use doesn’t matter at all. And some fortune 500 companies will find this comforting. Because as one manager at a Fortune 20 company told me last week, "We’re using all three kinds of Hadoop because we don’t know which will be dominant."

Discussion Point: Omnichannel Marketing in the 2014 Holiday Season

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Marketing technology vendors love to preach the value of sending consumers personalized offers on the device they're using at just the right moment.

Though we're only emerging from the developmental infancy of omnichannel marketing, several companies offer software and services that promise to do just that. Chief marketing officers at major retailers are spending more of their budgets on collecting data, analyzing actions and monitoring social media -- all with an eye toward increasing sales in their hyper-competitive sector.

Gartner Tries to Protect Its Magic Quadrants

Gartner really doesn't want to lift the veil of secrecy surrounding its Magic Quadrant (MQ) reports.

The research firm is challenging many of NetScout's requests for information about its business practices, processes and internal review procedures involving the MQ reports. Calling the information confidential, proprietary and tantamount to trade secrets, Gartner filed the objections in connection with a lawsuit in Connecticut Superior Court.

Update: The case is scheduled to go to trial in February 2016.

AWS Supports Hybrid Cloud with EC2 Container Service #reinvent

“Why do developers love containers?”

This is the question Werner Vogels, CTO and Vice President of Amazon.com, asked attendees of the AWS re:Invent conference in Las Vegas just before announcing the preview availability of EC2 Container Services (ECS) – the new service for managing Docker containers that boosts AWS support for hybrid cloud.

After answering his question with a listing of benefits such as ease of development management, portability between environments, lower risk in deployments, smoother maintenance and management of application components, and the ability for it all to work together, Vogel went on to talk about the challenges of working with containers. 

“It’s really hard, I find,” he said. “Scheduling containers requires a lot of heavy lifting.” For example, he noted issues such as placement for higher availability, dividing resources per container, launching, rolling back, and handling custom management. 

With ECS, he said, customers can get all the benefits of containers without the overhead.

AWS Woos Enterprises with New Security Services #reinvent

Amazon is taking steps to ease enterprises’ biggest concerns around moving to its AWS platform. During a keynote at its AWS re:Invent conference in Las Vegas yesterday, the company announced three new security and compliance services developed specifically for enterprise customers.

Enterprises have been reluctant to move "the number of workloads they really wanted to move” to the cloud and AWS because of security and compliance issues, said Andy Jassy, senior vice president of Amazon Web Services. “What we see as the new normal now is that security and compliance are becoming reasons that customers are moving to the cloud.”

Trusting Your Gut: The Worst Marketing Move You Can Make

2014-13-November-Bad-Fit.jpgHere’s a tip: When it comes to marketing your business, leave your “gut” out of it.

No matter how good your intuition, how prestigious of a business school you attended or how much marketing know-how you seemingly possess, if you think you can make marketing decisions by “trusting your gut” alone, you’re in for a rude awakening.

Things have changed. We don’t count on old wives tales to predict the weather, and business people don’t make marketing decisions on a hunch. Well, at least the smart ones don’t.

The Market Likes Hortonworks' IPO Filing

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In one sense the timing of Hortonworks IPO filing couldn’t have been better. It came on Monday, just a week after Forrester analyst Mike Gualtieri said that Hadoop in the enterprise was no longer optional.

“The jury is in. Hadoop has been found not guilty of being an over-hyped open source platform. Hadoop has proven real enterprise value in any number of use cases including data lakes, traditional and advanced analytics,” he wrote in his Forrester blog.

He went on to say that the dazed and confused CIOs who haven’t had Hadoop on their agendas thus far will get with the program in 2015.

So if you’re one of the three independent commercial vendors providing software and support for the open source big data muncher, it’s highly likely that your business is going to take off. Especially because there’s not an analyst, or even a competitor, we can find who thinks Hadoop is a winner-takes-all-market.

And it’s a big market.

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