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Aws News & Analysis

Zocalo + Amazon Web Services Could Be Game Changer

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Things are already pretty messy in the productivity space between Microsoft and Google. But it could get a whole lot messier.

Amazon Web Services (AWS)  just announced that its document storage, sharing and collaboration application for the enterprises is now on general release.

Amazon Zocalo has been in limited preview since July, but is now available to all AWS customers with bargain basement prices, and could be a game changer in the document collaboration and sharing and sync space.

Big Data Bits: Big Data Smarts

Yesterday Salesforce completed its acquisition of RelateIQ, a startup that combines CRM and data science to get the right messages to the right person at the right time. The sales price was $392,133,512 -- not bad for a company that was founded three years ago.

While much was reported when the sale was first announced, little has been said as to what happens next, other than Salesforce gaining improved big data, data science and analytic capabilities.

Yesterday VentureBeat wrote, without identifying its source, that Salesforce would create an R&D division, Salesforce X, where RelateIQ’s data scientists would work.

Not a bad idea considering that RelateIQ’s Chief Technology officer, DJ Patil, was named one of the 7 most powerful data scientists in the world by Forbes magazine, and is credited (along with Jeff Hammerbacher) to have coined the term “data scientist”.

Patil’s team members aren’t slackers either. Rusian Belkin, Twitter’s former VP Engineering, Search and Content, leads Engineering at RealateIQ. And then there’s Daniel Francisco, Relate IQ’s Manager of Product, he was Chief of Staff and Product Manager at Linkedin.

Even if the Salesforce X rumor is wrong, it’s a good idea. So how about it, Mr. Benioff? You have one of the best data teams in the world working for you and chances are good that they’re more into doing interesting work than money. The latter of which they probably have plenty of because all of the successful startups they’ve worked at.

The Enterprise of the Future: Not as Cloudy as You Think?

The enterprise is “all in” on the (public) cloud, right? That’s certainly what all the hype leads us to believe.

After all, hardly a week goes by without Amazon, Google or Microsoft dropping their prices as they race to the bottom in the cloud wars. Not only that but there are also a host of celebrity-like CEO’s such as Salesforce’s Marc Benioff, Amazon’s Werner Vogels and Box’s Aaron Levie. They’re constantly in front of crowds preaching cloud-only gospels.

And there are the more recently converted to consider as well, such as IBM’s Ginni Rometty, who bought Cloudant, Silverpop and SoftLayer over the past 18 months and launched the IBM’s cloud Marketplace in April. Never mind SAP’s Bill McDermott, who started to refer the company he now single-handedly reins as “the cloud company”.

But all of that being said, there’s a newer trend in the enterprise now taking hold that indicates that the future may actually be hybrid. It seems that some managers don’t want or can’t have their data floating around “in the heavens” for reasons of security and compliance reasons, despite the cost savings.

Big Data Bits: Big Data Empowered

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The analysts say that big data is maturing, that we’re no longer in an investigative mode and that instead we’re getting busy. Big vendors are buying start-ups to extend capabilities to their customers, we’re starting to run Hadoop on the Cloud, we’re using new databases to power activities we wouldn’t have dreamed of in the past, and so on. Want to know more? Read on … 

AWS Message is Clear: Get Your Head Into Cloud for Agility

2014-16-July-Ostrich.jpgIt’s amazing that I still hear companies say cloud computing is not part of their strategy or they can't run the risk of storing secure data in the cloud. It's kind of like saying they still work by candlelight despite the invention of the light bulb. It’s time to come out of the dark ages!

The attendance at last week's AWS Summit 2014 held in New York City may be an indication that the tide is finally turning. The event drew a record attendance and claimed to have more than 10,000 registrations. The attendees clogged registration lines to the point where they actually ran out of badges. Thousands of others also watched the event remotely in real time. Maybe this is all a sign that people are finally getting their heads out of the sand and into the cloud!
 

Amazon Wants In on the Enterprise Sync and Share Action Too

Just yesterday we wrote that the file storage, synching and sharing market may be as big as one trillion dollars. When Amazon found out about it, they went and built their own EFSS offering.

OK, maybe it wasn’t our article that inspired AWS, but they did introduce an Enterprise Storage and Sharing service today. Its name? Zocalo.

Available in limited preview starting now, its primary functions seem to be primitive versions of what the Leaders and Challengers in Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for EFSS have to offer.

Brick-and-Mortar 'Cloud Store' isn't What it Seems #AmazonEvent

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It could be a coincidence, but then again, maybe not. Either way, it seems all but certain that Amazon will finally unveil its very own smartphone later today at a launch event in Seattle.

And that could have a great deal to do with the “day-long boot camps,” “classes” and tutorials that Amazon is conducting “free of charge” in its brick-and-mortar pop-up cloud store in San Francisco.

Reports indicate the new “device,” which was probably developed in Amazon’s Silicon Valley-based hardware Lab126, will be different than the iPhone and the Android devices we use today because it will have a 3-D, Google glass-type interface.

Chances are good that even the most experienced smart phone app developers might benefit from one-on-one tutorials (like you get at the Genius Bar at Apple) or need some related training to make the most of the new device’s capabilities.

After all, in order for a new smartphone to make a dent in today’s market, its apps and services have to be incredible. And it seems that at least some of those built for Amazon’s forthcoming device already may be.

Amazon Opens a Brick-and-Mortar Cloud Store

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Retailers along San Francisco's Market Street have struggled to make a buck over the past decade, in large part because of competition from online stores like Amazon.com. So it isn't without irony that Amazon Web Services opened a brick-and-mortar pop-up store in their midst.

At first, the 30-foot wide, three-story high storefront looks empty compared to the carefully decorated windows and sales banners in neighboring stores. Then you spot the burly bouncer guarding the door, suggesting that something private is going on behind the whited-out windows. Finally, you see the modest lettering for Amazon Web Services somewhat above eye level. And still, you wonder, what is this?

This is a month-long experiment for AWS that blends one part Apple Genius Bar, two parts hip startup and a smidge of trade show marketing to produce a coffee-scented, loft-like environment where Amazon's cloud clients can ask for some free advice, attend events, get some training or, perhaps, just wash down a handful of M&Ms with a complimentary cappuccino. Day-long boot camps, normally $600, are free, like everything else here.

These Cloud Computing Vendors are Edging Up on AWS

Sure, Amazon Web Services (AWS) is the golden child of cloud computing, but Microsoft Azure isn't too far behind. And according to Gartner’s recently released Magic Quadrant for Cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (Iaas), it's starting to nip into AWS’s market.

Gartner contends AWS is beginning to face significant competition on two fronts:  Microsoft is competing in the traditional business market and Google is challenging it in the cloud native market.

Google Ups Its Cloud Game With Stackdriver Buy

Google Cloud Platform May 8 2014.jpgIn the latest twist in the ongoing battle for dominance in the cloud space, Google just announced it has bought Stackdriver, a cloud app monitoring service.

According to a statement from Google, Stackdriver’s technology will be pushed onto the Google Cloud platform. It underlines the company's ambitions to develop as a real challenger to Amazon Web Services (AWS).

Google has provided little information about the deal, but has said it will start working on integrating Stackdriver’s functionality into the Google Cloud as quickly as possible.

Google, Amazon Cut Cloud Prices Again

The battle for cloud supremacy intensified again.  At its Cloud Platform Live event Tuesday, Google slashed the prices for its cloud services lower than Amazon and Microsoft. Amazon responded with similar cuts. No news from Microsoft yet, but one thing is clear.

The big winners are cloud users.

Google Hits Microsoft Again By Slashing Storage Prices

As we noted yesterday, Google upped the game in the ongoing battle for dominance in the productivity suite space by offering new add-ons as well as cash to users who switch to Google Drive. Now Google is slashing the price of storage on Google Drive. 

Our 2 Cents on Forrester Wave for Big Data Hadoop Solutions

Analyst reports can be a big bore -- the Forrester Wave: Big Data Hadoop Solutions, Q1 2014 ($2495 fee) is not.

Its authors, Mike Gualtieri and Noel Yuhanna, have done a bang-up job writing in simple English and giving a spot-on overview of what the market looks like:“cutthroat,” where “pure-play upstarts (Cloudera, Hortonworks, MapR) must capture market share quickly to make venture investors happy” and in which “stalwart enterprise software vendors (IBM, Pivotal, Teradata) must avoid being disintermediated.” 

Altiscale has the RX for Hadoop Headaches

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Hadoop isn’t easy.

Sure, there are vendors out there who will tell you that it is ... Just take this course or that exam. Work with us side-by-side as we “elephantize” your Enterprise, and presto you’re a pro.

No, you’re not.

Not yet, anyway. Regardless of what any of the 268,000 hits you get when you enter the term “Hadoop training” into Google happens to say. And it’s not that these folks are trying to mislead you — they’ve put their heads and their hearts into encouraging and enabling the widespread adoption of Hadoop.

It’s just that becoming a master at Hadoop (Wikipedia definition: open-source software framework for storage and large scale processing of data-sets on clusters of commodity hardware) takes time, experience, trial and error and enough opportunities to generate a continuous record of success. But that’s not all. As a new technology with a vibrant Open Source community, Hadoop keeps changing, so it’s hard to keep up.

Microsoft Ups Hybrid Cloud Stakes to Grab Amazon, Google Market Share

 Microsoft has upped the stakes again in the battle for cloud platform supremacy with the launch of Cloud OS Network. It brings 25 top cloud service providers under the same banner to deliver hosted services on the Microsoft Cloud Platform.

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