HOT TOPICS: Customer Experience Marketing Automation Social Business SharePoint 2013 Document Management Big Data Mobile DAM

Facebook, Social Media News & Practices

Take That, SF Giants! KC Wins Social Media World Series

2014-30-October-Royals Fans.jpg

San Francisco must be a ghost town today -- not just for Halloween.

It's because it's a city of losers.

After all, the Kansas City Royals and their fans won the Social Media Mentions World Series over the hometown Giants.

Depression by the Bay? Yep.

Sure, the Giants won their third World Series title in five years last night by defeating the Royals, 3-2, in the decisive Game 7 in Kansas City.

Sure, they'll be talking in 100 years about Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner and his three World Series wins like we talk today about Babe Ruth.

But in social media, the score was Kansas City 2 million, San Francisco 1.4 million. Take that, Bumgarner, San Francisco and your one-every-two-years World Series championship pace!

Facebook Flexes Its Mobile Muscle, Lifts Profit 90%

Thumbnail image for 2014-24-July-Mark Zuckerberg Facebook.jpg

If there were any doubts about Facebook's momentum after Twitter's disappointing financial outlook, they vanished yesterday when the social network exceeded earnings expectations with a third-quarter profit that jumped 90 percent from a year ago.

Marketers found a lot to like in Facebook's quarterly report. For example, CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a conference call that the Menlo Park, Calif.-based company is now serving 1 billion videos per day and that its Instagram users are spending a generous 21 minutes per day on the service.

But the biggest news was about mobile ads. Daily active users on mobile jumped 39 percent from a year ago to 703 million. And revenue from mobile ads accounted for two-thirds of the company's advertising sales during the third quarter, up from 49 percent just a year ago.

Google Plus Gasps for Breath, Does Anyone Care?

2014-23-September-gone-to-seed.jpg

There's no mourning in cyberspace, no overt sentimental ramblings on social media — despite yet another move by Google to put its struggling social network out of its misery.

This time, Google is dropping the requirement for all new users to create a Plus account when signing up for a Google network.

Typically when Google chops a product, it triggers a storm of protests. With Plus, though, the blogosphere has been largely silent — a sure reflection of how few people care whether the network fades away.

Chris Brogan: Stay Focused, Stay Social and Be Nice

Connecting with Bill Sobel

Chris Brogan is a lot of things … an author, journalist, marketing consultant, public speaker and "veteran of the social media revolution."

He's CEO of Owner Media Group, publisher of a digital business magazine called, not surprisingly, Owner. He's consulted for a host of companies, including GM, Coke, PepsiCo, Sony, Microsoft, Google and Motorola, and he's a New York Times bestselling author of eight books, including The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth, and Just Start Here 

But forget about all that for a moment. The thing it seems Brogan really wants you to know is that he's a nice guy. As he explains on his blog:

Biographies are really weird things. About pages. All that. You basically have to primp yourself up and act all pompous and important and make sure people know why you’re worth it. I’m a really approachable and nice-seeming guy. Never hesitate to introduce yourself to me when you see me out and about, okay? I'm nice. Promise."

And this nice guy finished first, too, at least on one of Forbes magazine's list of social media power influencers and Business Insider's list of people to follow on Twitter.

LeadSift Promises Smarter Ad Targeting through Twitter

Twitter has yet to reach its full potential when it comes to ad targeting. The social networking site has long been playing catchup to Facebook, which launched its email-based targeting service in 2012. Twitter didn’t announce its “tailored audiences” service until this past January.

With Facebook, advertisers can also target people by the “interests” the site asks new users to fill in when creating an account. Twitter’s answer to this was to let advertisers push their marketing messages to users based on who the user follows.

For example, if a user follows several football players, coaches and commentators, they may receive a targeted ad from a company selling sports drinks. More recently, Twitter announced the ability for advertisers to target consumers based on keywords found within a user’s tweets.

Friday Fun Day: Insider's Guide to Facebook Image Sizes

2014-15-August-Oven-Roast.jpgFacebook may generate a lot of hate. But it generates even more interest — especially from marketers who struggle daily to keep up with its ever changing guidelines on how and what to do everything from encourage page "likes" to keep customers engaged.

So it was with great interest that I stumbled upon a blog by Emily Goodrich. She's a technical writer at Heyo, a Blacksburg, Va.-based startup that wants to help small-business owners gain followers on sites like Facebook and Twitter and convert those followers into email captures and sales. 

Goodrich shared a marketing essential: a Facebook image size cheatsheet.

Yep, Facebook Generates a Lot of Hate

2014-13-August-ambivalent-cat.jpg

Let's face it, social media networks are annoying ... but we can't live without them.

Especially Facebook. The controversy around the social media giant's re-launch of Facebook Messenger has once again stirred up a nest of privacy concerns.

Like all social networks, Facebook has benefits and warts. The benefit is that it is sublimely designed, it works very well, its got a gigantic user base (including most of your friends) and its got a world-class team constantly refining and tweaking it.

The downside is that Facebook is an immensely commercial operation and it doesn't seem to care too much about your privacy. This is not Craigslist. Let's face it: Facebook is chronicling every subtle activity in your life in a gigantic database so it can cash in on your life. 

Facebook Shuts the Gate on Likes

2014-12-august-shut-the-gate.jpg

Here's disappointing news for every consumer who likes to "like" a page on Facebook just to get a $10 off coupon or a by-one-get-one-free offer.

The social network has blocked companies from requiring customers to like a Facebook pages in exchange for contest entries or other company rewards — a practice known as like-gating.

According to a Facebook developers blog post, effective Aug. 7, companies are prohibited from incentivizing customers to “use social plugins or to like a page.” It's still acceptable to ask people to like your page — but they have to like it because, well, they actually like it. Existing apps have until Nov. 5 to comply with the new mandate.

Jim Belosic, CEO of ShortStack, said the move shouldn’t be a big surprise to most seasoned social media marketers. “The overall reaction has been great because I think that many businesses saw this coming, or if not, had turned away from Like-gating on their own over the last six months to a year,” he said. 

So, why have companies moved away from like-gating, and what can marketers use in its place? 

CPM Rises, CPC Drops for Facebook Advertisers

Advertisers are becoming more sophisticated in their Facebook advertising strategy. That's one of the key takeaways in the latest data about global Facebook advertising from social marketing software provider SHIFT.

Of course, Facebook is a big target, with seven percent of the total digital ad spending in the world. The data in the report is based on activity from SHIFT's advertising platform, its Open Marketing Cloud for social ad campaigns that was introduced in spring of last year.

"Advertisers are beginning to learn how to leverage the user data available to them," SHIFT co-founder and CEO James Borow told CMSWire. They are also "applying that data to set the strategies around ad creative, content, ad type and device type," he said.

Facebook Thinks You'll 'Like' Enterprise Collaboration

social business, More Facebook Cloning Coming to Enterprise Collaboration?

Facebook at work. I've never done that. Have you?

But what if Facebooking at work was actually encouraged, maintained by your company itself and used for collaboration?

That could be what's happening in Zuckerberg Land, if you believe the anonymous source who told a reporter last month that the social network's working on a FB@Work platform in its London offices.

Startup Offers Free Collaboration Option for Any Web Page

Just as Microsoft blends Yammer into Office365, a startup is offering a free service to add a Facebook-like collaboration tool to any web page.

Lifestreams Technologies, a 2-year-old company based in New Haven, Conn., said the widget can be used on any intranet or public-facing website by adding a snippet of code to the html.

"Most websites today are relatively static," said Peter Prosol, business development director for the 10-person SaaS firm. "You'll find pictures and images and text, but it's more or less as it is. It doesn't change much. But adding a timeline to your site ... it lets you be more dynamic, add new content, refresh and be a little more interactive and engaging to the user."

Should You Be One of Facebook's 1.5 Million Marketers?

digital marketing, Should You Be One of Facebook's 1.5 Million Marketers?

Facebook's total revenue grew to more than $2.9 billion and advertising revenue climbed 67 percent from a year ago, its CEO said in a earnings conference call last night.

And for its growth, Facebook thanks the 30 million small businesses and its 1.5 million active marketers who use the world's No. 1 social media platform.

"To continue delivering the best returns for marketers, we’ve been very focused on improving the quality of the ad experiences for our community," CEO Mark Zuckerberg (left) said. "Our goal here is to make ads as interesting and useful as your friends' content on Facebook. We're investing heavily in this area, and this quarter we launched a number of efforts to improve the quality and relevance of our ads, including our new ads preferences tool, interest-based advertising and improvements to News Feed designed to reduce low-quality content."

Facebook's Mind Experiments: Just Media As Usual

2014-8-July-A-Clockwork-Orange.jpg

Yes, "furor erupted" over Facebook's massive psychological experiment to control user emotions by changing the configuration of posts.

How naive are we, really? Of course Facebook wants to control your thoughts — that's the whole point of media.

Emotional manipulation in the media is nothing new. That's why we have Rush Limbaugh. Perhaps Facebook's experiment was more disturbing because of its scale, and the fact that it failed to alert or gain the consent of its users.

But anybody thinking that the trend of media companies using real time user data to control reactions of its audience is something new is mistaken. 

How Much Is Your Data Worth?

2014-19-June-Froggy-Love.jpgIn today’s age of information, data is currency. Information about our preferences, habits and everything in our life is a valuable commodity for companies trying to learn more about us in order to make us their customer. The value of our personal data seems to rise every day.

If our personal data is valuable, shouldn’t we guard our privacy more closely? If we are giving away information for free, how much are we getting in return? Data for services is the business model for both Google and Facebook. They provide you a free service and in return, they mine your data to drive advertising revenue. The question people don’t seem to be asking is this, “Is the average consumer aware of the value of their information to make an informed decision?”

Yep, Brands Talk Like 5th Graders on Facebook

A majority of Facebook posts by brands -- 67.3 percent of them, to be exact -- are written at an elementary school level — with 1st grade being the grade level most frequently targeted. That's the not so surprising results of a study by Track Maven, a competitive intelligence company.

Grade level is determined using the Flesch-Kincaid readability test, which analyzes passages and rates them on a scale from 0 to 100 according to difficulty. Passages suitable for 11-year-olds —  most of what is apparently on Facebook — score between 90 and 100. 

Displaying 1-15 of 940 results

< Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Next >