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Hadoop News & Analysis

MapR, Teradata Ink Deal, Bad Timing for Hortonworks?

Teradata now has a flavor of Hadoop for everyone.

This morning Hadoop distro provider MapR and Teradata, the big data analytics and marketing applications company, announced that they have expanded their partnership. What it comes down to, in the simplest possible terms, is that the companies will work together to integrate and co-develop their joint products and to create a unified go to market strategy,

Teradata will also be able to resell MapR software, professional services, and provide customer support.

In other words, Teradata will be the face of MapR to enterprises who use, or want to use, both technologies.

Making Existing Big Data Investments Work For You

2014-18-November-Unisphere.jpgCIOs and CMOs have stopped talking about big data and data analytics as something they're exploring or planning on looking into in the near future. Analysts and experts rarely, if ever, call big data the "next big thing" any more. Does all this mean big data is over? Just the opposite.

Big data has finally arrived and is quickly maturing. IT leaders are now shifting from thinking about the possibility of making investments in big data platforms to thinking about how to get more out of the investments they’ve already made.

HP Vertica Makes Hadoop Purr

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Whatever has been said about the way HP runs its business, it’s time to turn the page. CEO Meg Whitman and her team certainly have. Hardware on one side of the street, big data and analytics on the other. There’s no need for one business to stifle the other. Each has the right to think for itself and to act swiftly.

HP’s Vertica team has certainly heard the message, and it hasn’t wasted any time. It's announcing Vertica for SQL on Hadoop today. It’s an analytics platform that enables customers to access and explore data residing in any of the three primary Hadoop distros — Hortonworks, MapR, Cloudera — or any combination thereof.

That’s right, the brand or brands of Hadoop you use doesn’t matter at all. And some fortune 500 companies will find this comforting. Because as one manager at a Fortune 20 company told me last week, "We’re using all three kinds of Hadoop because we don’t know which will be dominant."

The Market Likes Hortonworks' IPO Filing

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In one sense the timing of Hortonworks IPO filing couldn’t have been better. It came on Monday, just a week after Forrester analyst Mike Gualtieri said that Hadoop in the enterprise was no longer optional.

“The jury is in. Hadoop has been found not guilty of being an over-hyped open source platform. Hadoop has proven real enterprise value in any number of use cases including data lakes, traditional and advanced analytics,” he wrote in his Forrester blog.

He went on to say that the dazed and confused CIOs who haven’t had Hadoop on their agendas thus far will get with the program in 2015.

So if you’re one of the three independent commercial vendors providing software and support for the open source big data muncher, it’s highly likely that your business is going to take off. Especially because there’s not an analyst, or even a competitor, we can find who thinks Hadoop is a winner-takes-all-market.

And it’s a big market.

Is the Hadoop Market Ready to Go? Hortonworks Filed its IPO

OK Cloudera, you say the world’s only commercial pure Open Source Hadoop distro provider, Hortonworks, doesn’t have a sustainable business model?

Well, let’s see Wall St. thinks.

Today, the company unveiled news that it confidentially filed its S-1 with the US Securities and Exchange Commission in August under the auspices of the JOBS Act. Form S-1 is used by companies planning on going public to register their securities with the SEC.

While many think that IPO’s are about founders cashing in on their blood sweat and tears, you can bet that Hortonworks is raising money for one specific reason — namely, to get the capital it needs to become the world’s predominant enterprise Hadoop provider.

If Hadoop Disappears, Will the Label on Your Distro Matter?

2014-24-October-Elephant-Family.jpgIn the next year we’ll see Hadoop disappear, so said Cloudera co-founder and chief strategy officer Mike Olson in his keynote at the O’Reilly Strata + Hadoop World conference last week.

Olson has a way of saying things that cause a reaction. Last year it was his introduction of the Enterprise Data Hub that took everyone off guard, and this year it’s the promise that the big data muncher named after an elephant in a storybook will practically vanish from the line of sight of all but a few geeks.

You’d think that if it were invisible and it was all open source then the brand of Hadoop used might not matter so much.

Cloudera + Microsoft's Snuggle in the Cloud Causes Confusion

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Anyone that Hortonworks gets into bed with, Cloudera snuggles up to next.

This, of course, is not a proven theorem. But it sure seems to be the case lately.

Earlier this month Hadoop enterprise data hub provider Cloudera announced a deeper integration with long time Hortonworks partner Teradata. Hortonworks’ 100 percent open source Hadoop distribution (HDP) powers many of Teradata’s big data offerings, including the Teradata Appliance for Hadoop.

Yesterday, at a Microsoft press event, Mike Olson, Cloudera’s Chief Strategy Officer, shared the stage with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella and corporate vice president Scott Guthrie to announce his company’s intention to become Microsoft Azure Certified.

Faking Big Data #strataconf

Sorry folks, but this shouldn’t come as too big of a surprise. Anytime a new technology or field emerges, so does a group of posers. They’re typically software vendors, consulting firms and “experts” who claim to be able to help you cross the chasm between where you are and where you need to go to remain viable in the future.

These aren’t, for the most part, evil companies, snake oil salesman or under educated individuals. Vendors iterate products as quickly as they can and push them out too early, they take shortcuts and rationalize them and sometimes they simply don’t know that they don’t know what they’re doing.

Big data is still an emerging field.

Microsoft's Big Data Steps Boost Customer Insights #Strataconf

Microsoft hasn’t been shy about its goals for the data-driven age. It plans to bring business intelligence to a billion screens and to remove the barriers that are preventing broad adoption of advanced analytics.

These are lofty ambitions, perhaps, but there is no company on the planet that’s in a better position to deliver on them.

Put aside, for a moment, that Excel is a default tool for data crowd, that Office 365 is a next logical step for workers, and that so many enterprises inherently trust the Azure Cloud. The company is also rolling out big data solutions that are, at once, as powerful and compelling as those that scrappy start-ups are delivering today.

Cloudera + Teradata = Big Data Love?

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Hadoop may make many promises, but Teradata delivers solutions that enterprises trust.

We’re not saying this to ruffle any feathers because it isn’t an either or game. Every now and then we see headlines that say things like “Cloudera Declares End Of Data Warehousing Era” or see pictures of tombstones with RDBMS written on them, but the reality is that a good many of Teradata’s  users ignore  them or figure that Teradata will deliver big data capabilities, in a palatable doses, when the time is right.

And that’s essentially what Teradata and Hadoop pioneer Cloudera are banging the drums about this morning as they announce an expanded partnership around technology integration, sales and support. In other words, the two companies will work together to integrate Teradata’s integrated data warehouse and Cloudera’s enterprise data hub so that customers can work with multiple data sources (Cloudera’s Enterprise Data Hub being one of them) through the Teradata Unified Data Architecture (TDA).

This means that not only will Teradata customers be able to “buy” Cloudera’s products and services from Teradata, but that they’ll be tuned to work together and mutually supported.

Ellison Does His Own Demos, Loves His New Job #OOW14

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It was classic Larry Ellison on stage, part brilliant computer scientist, part hammy comedian, always entertaining.

Oracle OpenWorld, his company's mammoth annual convention that virtually shuts down the heart of San Francisco's SoMa district, will continue through tomorrow.

But Ellison's keynote presentation yesterday pretty much solidified the intended message for the capacity crowd: Oracle, which trailed its rivals to the cloud, now wants to be king of the cumulous.

Pivotal Revs Its Big Data Play, But There's a Better Story

2014-23-September-Chunyun.jpgWe’ve all heard an earful about the emergence of computing’s third platform, built for a world in which big data, mobile, social, analytics and cloud change the way we live and work. And while, for many of us, the actual impact thus far has been around shopping, dating, getting movie or music suggestions, there are real world examples that are absolute game-changers for large segments of the population.

And Pivotal’s big data platform and Pivotal GemFire, in particular, is powering some of them.

Pivotal GemFire, for anyone who needs a refresher, is a distributed in-memory data management solution for enterprises creating high-scale custom applications.
 

Does Cloudera Need to Cool It?

2014-22-September-Elephant-Fight.jpgA staple gun or roll of masking tape might come in handy today when Amr Awadallah walks in through his company’s doors. The CTO and co-founder of Hadoop platform provider Cloudera mouthed off about the competition to the European press late last week inspiring tweets like “Elephant fight!” The elephant reference, for anyone who may not know, refers to the symbol used for Apache Open Source Hadoop.

Are Hortonworks + Hive Community Paving Hadoop's Future?

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Marry a big vision and a vibrant open source community and you’ll get something pretty special. In this case we’re talking about delivery on the Stinger initiative, which teamed engineers from Hadoop distro provider Hortonworks with more than 140 developers to advance interactive SQL querying ability on Apache Hive at scale in pure open source.

The initiative, which was completed in April, brought together over 390,000 lines of code contributed by developers from 44 companies, to provide business analysts and data workers with one powerful engine for SQL queries on big data sets at speed and at petabyte scale.

It does something that other big data solutions like it do not do: it gives users a single, simple tool to use for either interactive or batch processing.

Get Ready for the Datapocalypse

2014-28-August-Maskatron.jpgToday’s data is bigger, stronger and faster. The increasing complexity of data is pushing organizations toward a tipping point -- those that harness its value will excel, those that don’t will fall behind.

But becoming a data-driven organization is no longer just a smart way to build a competitive advantage -- it's a necessity to survive the pending Datapocalypse. As everything from fridges and thermostats to cars and factories produce more and more data, organizations need to be able to quickly analyze and act on it or risk catastrophic damage.

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