HOT TOPICS: Customer Experience Marketing Automation Social Business SharePoint 2013 Document Management Big Data Mobile DAM

Hadoop News & Analysis

Maybe Hadoop Providers Can Protect Your Data After All

There’s one thing no one in the Hadoop community will argue about — namely, that the big data crunching technology’s enterprise features are growing quickly.

In fact, that may be one of the best things about the highly competitive market. Every vendor is continuously raising its game to win customers.

And in the Hadoop world, security is a hot issue. “Hadoop isn’t inherently secure,” said David Chaiken, CTO of Hadoop-as-a-Service (HaaS) provider Altiscale.

But that doesn’t mean that the Hadoop-based products or services that Enterprises pay for aren’t secure. On the contrary, that’s one of the reasons that the commercial vendors are in business. It’s what they add on to naked Apache Hadoop that creates differentiation.

Users Wonder: Can Hadoop Protect Our Big Data?

Nearly nine out of 10 Hadoop users (89 percent) are uncertain whether native security tools provide enough protection for their big data projects.

The irony is almost the same percentage of users (86 percent) rate data security as a critical requirement for their Hadoop data lake or hub.

The survey was conducted by Protegrity at last month's Strata + Hadoop World Summit in San Jose, Calif.

Despite the giant question mark over Hadoop security, users are apparently willing to continue to deploy the technology.

Some 80 percent of respondents reported their organizations are using Hadoop in production environments. In addition, 80 percent estimate their organizations would be spending more on Hadoop-related projects this year.

Apache: What a Zoo

2015-23-March-Polar-Dive.jpg

"Someone told me it’s all happening at the zoo..."

If you're old enough to remember Simon and Garfunkel, you may appreciate that 48 years ago this month, their song “At the Zoo” entered the Billboard Top 10. For the rest of you -- the majority I'd expect -- you probably think of the Apache Software Foundation (ASF). I'd suggest that for all of us, ASF has improved our lives.

Cloudera Doesn't Spark Hadoop Wars, Really?

Don’t tell Oracle’s head honcho Larry Ellison that some of his former employees have taken a page from his book, but darn if geeks at Cloudera aren’t saying inflammatory things about the competition. In this case, the competition is Pivotal Software and certain members of the Open Data Platform (ODP) initiative. 

Check out the picture in the tweet below. It comes from a presentation at Cloudera’s analyst day held earlier this week. 

Oh Please Cloudera: It's Not Game Over Yet

2015-6-march-game-over.jpg

You know the kid on the block who claims victory even though the game is still being played — and when you ask him why he thinks he’s won, his answer is “because I said so?"

It seems that Tom Reilly, CEO of Hadoop distro provider Cloudera, might have borrowed a play from that book, inspiring Gigaom’s Derrick Harris to write the headline, “Cloudera CEO declares victory over big data competition.”

And while some might conclude that Reilly was talking only about Pivotal — which open sourced its big data platform last month and is now partnering with Hortonworks on its HDP distro — there's more to the story. There are at least two other Hadoop distro providers in the space whose market share is still growing, perhaps as fast or even faster than Cloudera’s. Analysts like them just as much, if not more, too.

Big Data Bits: Strata + Hadoop World Rewind

Last week was huge in the booming world of big data with vendors simultaneously chasing market share and sharing innovations on the big stage at Strata + Hadoop World in San Jose, Calif.

If you have a big data product or service to sell, there may not be a better opportunity. After all, there’s a captive audience that paid big bucks and committed their time to be there. Attendees genuinely want to hear what you have to say. This is why so many vendor announcements are made at, or around, the conference.

Putting forth the best you have to offer while on the big stage, without sounding like an infomercial or slamming the competition seems to challenge some, though. Here’s the secret, strut your best stuff, your grandest vision and your ability to deliver, and the customers you want to win over will see and hear, only you. Knock a competitor, even if you don’t out rightly name them, and there are two of you sharing the spotlight. Is that what you want customers to remember?

Enough said.

Are Hortonworks Numbers Better Than You Think?

2015-25-february-pour-over-numbers.jpg

When the analysts pore over Hortonworks financial results this morning, company President Herb Cunitz thinks he knows what they will say. Some will note that the Hadoop distro provider beat the street. But others will say it missed the mark when it comes to revenues, as much of the tech press suggested yesterday.

“The street thought we’d come in at $13.5 million and we brought in $16.7 million,” he said.

So why are articles on the web at the moment suggesting that Hortonworks’ fourth quarter revenues were $12.7 million. Fuzzy math?

Not really. It might just be a difference between  GAAP — the acronym for generally accepted accounting principles — and non-GAAP figures, said Cunitz.

Who Wants an Open Data Platform Anyways?

It turns out that some people do, in fact, want an Open Data Platform.

Despite all of the brouhaha that might have gone down last week, first around Pivotal Software’s Data Event and then at Strata and Hadoop World, some of the vendors and companies that have signed onto the Open Data Platform (ODP) initiative are calling it, “An answer to our Hadoop prayers.” The aforementioned quote comes from Scott Gnau, president of Teradata Labs.

Simon Schmidt, the chief data architect at Union Bank, provided a reason as to why the ODP — a tested reference core of open source Apache Hadoop, Apache Ambari and related Apache source artifacts — was vital for an enterprise like his.

“We can’t maintain an internal staff to do all the testing, compatibility testing and researching of every piece of technology that comes along,” he said, adding that “having some industry people backing these things, giving us the type of indemnification that we require make this (a big data platform) a viable option for us for the long term.”

That statement, perhaps, answers the question that Gartner Analyst Nick Heudecker posed when we interviewed him shortly after the ODP announcement. ”It’s not clear who’s asking for this.”

Does Hadoop Need Saving?

2015-20-February-Message-In-Bottle.jpg

It was a big week for big data in Silicon Valley where O’Reilly’s Strata & Hadoop World Conference is ending today. The star of the show might have been data scientist Vijay Subramanian of Rent the Runway whose company rents Oscar-worthy gowns (that most of us can’t afford to buy) for our one-night-only Cinderella moments. Or maybe it was data scientist Noelle Sio of Pivotal Labs who volunteered at CrisisTextLine which helps connect teens in trouble with the volunteer counselors who might help them. Or possibly President Barack Obama who streamed in via video to introduce DJ Patil as the United States’ Chief Data Scientist. Never mind all the vendors like Microsoft and MapR who made some impressive announcements.

But instead the halls were filled with talk about the news that Pivotal Software made when it open sourced the components of its big data suite (which we predicted and is unquestionably good news for everyone) and announced the Open Data Platform (ODP), an initiative that brings together GE, Hortonworks, IBM, Infosys, Pivotal, SAS, AltiScale, Capgemini, CenturyLink, EMC, Splunk, Verizon Enterprise Solutions, Teradata, and VMware (and is open to other companies that want to join).

MapR Closes the Big Data-to-Action Loop

2015-18-February-squirrel-holding-a-fruit-loop.jpg

Everyone knows the time from data-to-action can be critical to winning business, regardless of the variety, velocity, variability and volume of information involved in the process.

And in a world where data is created not only at a pace that is challenging to even ponder but also streams from the Internet of Things (IoT), data lakes are so broad and so deep that making sense of anything in them in real time and reacting accordingly seems unfathomable. Add globally distributed data, and forget about it.

Or maybe not. Because MapR’s latest release, which includes Hadoop has been built for the real time, data-centric enterprise. It leverages table replication features designed to extend access to “big and fast” data enabling multiple instances to be updated in different locations, with all the changes synchronized across them.

“Real time is not just about running a query. It’s also about how and where and how quickly information is processed and the action an organization is going to take,” said Jack Norris, the MapR's chief marketing officer.

Big Data for Geeks and Non-Geeks, Thanks Microsoft

Microsoft aims to do one thing better than anyone else: bring the power of productivity tools, big data, machine learning and data driven insight to both every day Jacks and Jills and geeks, and makes it look simple. How does it propose to do that? There’s Bing that tells Cortana who will win the World Cup and the Super Bowl, Delve that surfaces the content that’s most relevant to you without your needing to ask, Power BI that puts data driven insights and impressive, informative viz’s at your fingertips, Hadoop and machine learning delivered in the cloud, on premises and even on a silver platter (OK, maybe we’re going a bit too far). 

EMC/VMware Spinoff Pivotal Tests Big Data's Golden Rule

What’s good for the community is good for business. This is the new golden rule. Or at least that seems to be the case in the world of big data, where most commercial solutions are open source at their core.

“Enterprises don’t want lock-in,” said Michael Cucci, a marketing manager at EMC/VMware spinoff Pivotal Software, during an interview last week. He added that companies want to be able to influence the future of the technology that they use to drive their businesses. In fact it's practically a must. “It has to be open source or the conversation doesn’t begin,” he explained.

With realizations like this, how do you sell (even the best) a big data platform that’s largely proprietary?

It turns out that maybe you don’t.

What Big Secret Will Pivotal Unveil Next Week?

While it’s no secret that Pivotal is making a big announcement on Feb. 17 during which it will evangelize about a new, “groundbreaking” approach to big data, who exactly is showing up to its party remains to be seen, as is what they will be open sourcing and how they will be spinning it.

But here’s the deal, as time passes, people talk and wheels turn in everyone’s heads. Who will Pivotal’s “special industry guest” be? Does it really know “What’s next in big data”?  

Big Data Gets Smarter [Infographic]

2015-12-february-work-harder.jpg

Data scientists may be scarce, but big data news certainly isn’t. Quite frankly it’s hard to keep up with it all.

While in a world of unlimited space and time we’d be able to shed light on everything that’s notable, we can’t because our world is a bit more limited. So what we’ve chosen to do this week is bring you the stories we would have covered in long form had we had the bandwidth.

Hortonworks Spreads its Open Source Wings to Bring Governance to Hadoop

2015-28-January-Elephant-Wings.jpg

We all know Hortonworks is committed to open source, insisting that it’s the way to innovate on Hadoop and deliver the best enterprise-grade technology to the marketplace. And though its main competitor, Cloudera (or at least a member of its management team) may have taunted that Hortonworks’ business model is “undependable,” Wall Street certainly didn’t agree -- its shares soared 65 percent above the opening price on Dec. 12, 2014, its first day of trading as a public company.

Displaying 1-15 of 173 results

< Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Next >