HOT TOPICS: Customer Experience Marketing Automation Social Business SharePoint 2013 Document Management Big Data Mobile DAM

Hortonworks News & Analysis

Big Data Bits: Strata + Hadoop World Rewind

Last week was huge in the booming world of big data with vendors simultaneously chasing market share and sharing innovations on the big stage at Strata + Hadoop World in San Jose, Calif.

If you have a big data product or service to sell, there may not be a better opportunity. After all, there’s a captive audience that paid big bucks and committed their time to be there. Attendees genuinely want to hear what you have to say. This is why so many vendor announcements are made at, or around, the conference.

Putting forth the best you have to offer while on the big stage, without sounding like an infomercial or slamming the competition seems to challenge some, though. Here’s the secret, strut your best stuff, your grandest vision and your ability to deliver, and the customers you want to win over will see and hear, only you. Knock a competitor, even if you don’t out rightly name them, and there are two of you sharing the spotlight. Is that what you want customers to remember?

Enough said.

Are Hortonworks Numbers Better Than You Think?

2015-25-february-pour-over-numbers.jpg

When the analysts pore over Hortonworks financial results this morning, company President Herb Cunitz thinks he knows what they will say. Some will note that the Hadoop distro provider beat the street. But others will say it missed the mark when it comes to revenues, as much of the tech press suggested yesterday.

“The street thought we’d come in at $13.5 million and we brought in $16.7 million,” he said.

So why are articles on the web at the moment suggesting that Hortonworks’ fourth quarter revenues were $12.7 million. Fuzzy math?

Not really. It might just be a difference between  GAAP — the acronym for generally accepted accounting principles — and non-GAAP figures, said Cunitz.

Who Wants an Open Data Platform Anyways?

It turns out that some people do, in fact, want an Open Data Platform.

Despite all of the brouhaha that might have gone down last week, first around Pivotal Software’s Data Event and then at Strata and Hadoop World, some of the vendors and companies that have signed onto the Open Data Platform (ODP) initiative are calling it, “An answer to our Hadoop prayers.” The aforementioned quote comes from Scott Gnau, president of Teradata Labs.

Simon Schmidt, the chief data architect at Union Bank, provided a reason as to why the ODP — a tested reference core of open source Apache Hadoop, Apache Ambari and related Apache source artifacts — was vital for an enterprise like his.

“We can’t maintain an internal staff to do all the testing, compatibility testing and researching of every piece of technology that comes along,” he said, adding that “having some industry people backing these things, giving us the type of indemnification that we require make this (a big data platform) a viable option for us for the long term.”

That statement, perhaps, answers the question that Gartner Analyst Nick Heudecker posed when we interviewed him shortly after the ODP announcement. ”It’s not clear who’s asking for this.”

Does Hadoop Need Saving?

2015-20-February-Message-In-Bottle.jpg

It was a big week for big data in Silicon Valley where O’Reilly’s Strata & Hadoop World Conference is ending today. The star of the show might have been data scientist Vijay Subramanian of Rent the Runway whose company rents Oscar-worthy gowns (that most of us can’t afford to buy) for our one-night-only Cinderella moments. Or maybe it was data scientist Noelle Sio of Pivotal Labs who volunteered at CrisisTextLine which helps connect teens in trouble with the volunteer counselors who might help them. Or possibly President Barack Obama who streamed in via video to introduce DJ Patil as the United States’ Chief Data Scientist. Never mind all the vendors like Microsoft and MapR who made some impressive announcements.

But instead the halls were filled with talk about the news that Pivotal Software made when it open sourced the components of its big data suite (which we predicted and is unquestionably good news for everyone) and announced the Open Data Platform (ODP), an initiative that brings together GE, Hortonworks, IBM, Infosys, Pivotal, SAS, AltiScale, Capgemini, CenturyLink, EMC, Splunk, Verizon Enterprise Solutions, Teradata, and VMware (and is open to other companies that want to join).

Big Data for Geeks and Non-Geeks, Thanks Microsoft

Microsoft aims to do one thing better than anyone else: bring the power of productivity tools, big data, machine learning and data driven insight to both every day Jacks and Jills and geeks, and makes it look simple. How does it propose to do that? There’s Bing that tells Cortana who will win the World Cup and the Super Bowl, Delve that surfaces the content that’s most relevant to you without your needing to ask, Power BI that puts data driven insights and impressive, informative viz’s at your fingertips, Hadoop and machine learning delivered in the cloud, on premises and even on a silver platter (OK, maybe we’re going a bit too far). 

Hadoop's Future Might Take a Cloud Foundry-Like Route

Maybe it’s not yet a pattern, but we wouldn’t call it coincidence either. Pivotal, a spinoff from VMware and EMC, has a way of upstaging everyone else in the world of big data by making market-shifting announcements just one day before everyone else makes theirs at major big data (3rd platform) conferences.

It did it on February 25, 2013 when they announced Pivotal HD, stealing the spotlight from Cloudera, MapR, Intel, Wandisco and others who broke their news at O’Reilly’s Strata Conference the next day. It did it again on November 12, 2013 when they announced the launch of their multi-cloud enterprise Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) just ahead of AWS’ annual conference.

So it shouldn’t come as much of a surprise that it’ll be up to it again next week on February 17 when it has scheduled a webcast to update the world on its “New Approach to Big Data.” This is just one day before their competitors, collaborators and those who fall somewhere in between are slated to make their own big data announcements at O’Reilly’s Strata+ Hadoop World Conference in San Jose, Calif.

Hortonworks Spreads its Open Source Wings to Bring Governance to Hadoop

2015-28-January-Elephant-Wings.jpg

We all know Hortonworks is committed to open source, insisting that it’s the way to innovate on Hadoop and deliver the best enterprise-grade technology to the marketplace. And though its main competitor, Cloudera (or at least a member of its management team) may have taunted that Hortonworks’ business model is “undependable,” Wall Street certainly didn’t agree -- its shares soared 65 percent above the opening price on Dec. 12, 2014, its first day of trading as a public company.

Big Data Bits: Spotlight on EMC, VMware, MongoDB, Hortonworks

Big data and the vendors that help us leverage it are “all that” in 2015. The evangelists have created believers. Enterprises are strategizing and implementing, their pilots are done. And entrepreneurs are crushing data and creating smart products, the kind we haven’t seen before.

With only one work week completed in 2015, here’s the hottest of the hot news.

Is Teradata Buying its Way into Big Data Leadership?

Teradata is serious about big data. In fact, when it comes to Hadoop, it wants to be the one-stop shop for its large customer base. Aside from making its existing products more powerful and more capable, it recently strengthened its support partnerships with independent Hadoop distro providers MapR and Cloudera, and signaled a continued commitment to Hortonworks, which in now publicly traded as Nasdaq:HDP.

Today the company announced that it has purchase RainStor, a provider of patented Enterprise archiving solutions around Hadoop.

Hortonworks IPO: Why It Has to Happen Tomorrow

2014-11-December-Wall-Street.jpgYou can bet that the folks at Hortonworks’ won’t sleep much tonight, instead they’ll likely be replaying and rethinking every move they’ve made as a private company and every aspect of their strategy. As the youngest of the three primary, independent, commercial Hadoop distribution providers, they’ve gone from saying that they wouldn’t be talking about an IPO anytime soon, to suggesting that it might happen in 2015, to secretly filing in August, to unveiling the filing last month, to setting the date for the actual offering -- it’s tomorrow.

What’s the sudden hurry?

As Gartner analyst Merv Adrian puts it, “There might not be a better time.”

And, at least in the near term, he may have a point. Unless it’s possible to go back in time, that is.

Hortonworks IPO: 9 Days and Counting

2014-04-December-countdown.jpg

Wow, that was fast.

Less than a month after Hortonworks unveiled the news that it confidentially filed its S-1 with the US Securities and Exchange Commission, it has set its expected IPO date for Dec. 12, according to Nasdaq. The offer amount is $96.6 million, with prices for individual shares set at $12 to $14. A total of six million shares will be made available.

Hortonworks is the first independent, commercial Hadoop provider to go public. Some believe that its IPO will be a bellwether for the $50.2 billion data-related segments (data management and data storage) of the enterprise software market.

MapR, Teradata Ink Deal, Bad Timing for Hortonworks?

Teradata now has a flavor of Hadoop for everyone.

This morning Hadoop distro provider MapR and Teradata, the big data analytics and marketing applications company, announced that they have expanded their partnership. What it comes down to, in the simplest possible terms, is that the companies will work together to integrate and co-develop their joint products and to create a unified go to market strategy,

Teradata will also be able to resell MapR software, professional services, and provide customer support.

In other words, Teradata will be the face of MapR to enterprises who use, or want to use, both technologies.

The Market Likes Hortonworks' IPO Filing

2014-12-November-Slow-Clap.jpg

In one sense the timing of Hortonworks IPO filing couldn’t have been better. It came on Monday, just a week after Forrester analyst Mike Gualtieri said that Hadoop in the enterprise was no longer optional.

“The jury is in. Hadoop has been found not guilty of being an over-hyped open source platform. Hadoop has proven real enterprise value in any number of use cases including data lakes, traditional and advanced analytics,” he wrote in his Forrester blog.

He went on to say that the dazed and confused CIOs who haven’t had Hadoop on their agendas thus far will get with the program in 2015.

So if you’re one of the three independent commercial vendors providing software and support for the open source big data muncher, it’s highly likely that your business is going to take off. Especially because there’s not an analyst, or even a competitor, we can find who thinks Hadoop is a winner-takes-all-market.

And it’s a big market.

Is the Hadoop Market Ready to Go? Hortonworks Filed its IPO

OK Cloudera, you say the world’s only commercial pure Open Source Hadoop distro provider, Hortonworks, doesn’t have a sustainable business model?

Well, let’s see Wall St. thinks.

Today, the company unveiled news that it confidentially filed its S-1 with the US Securities and Exchange Commission in August under the auspices of the JOBS Act. Form S-1 is used by companies planning on going public to register their securities with the SEC.

While many think that IPO’s are about founders cashing in on their blood sweat and tears, you can bet that Hortonworks is raising money for one specific reason — namely, to get the capital it needs to become the world’s predominant enterprise Hadoop provider.

If Hadoop Disappears, Will the Label on Your Distro Matter?

2014-24-October-Elephant-Family.jpgIn the next year we’ll see Hadoop disappear, so said Cloudera co-founder and chief strategy officer Mike Olson in his keynote at the O’Reilly Strata + Hadoop World conference last week.

Olson has a way of saying things that cause a reaction. Last year it was his introduction of the Enterprise Data Hub that took everyone off guard, and this year it’s the promise that the big data muncher named after an elephant in a storybook will practically vanish from the line of sight of all but a few geeks.

You’d think that if it were invisible and it was all open source then the brand of Hadoop used might not matter so much.

Displaying 1-15 of 65 results

< Previous 1 2 3 4 5 Next >