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Hortonworks News & Analysis

MapR, Teradata Ink Deal, Bad Timing for Hortonworks?

Teradata now has a flavor of Hadoop for everyone.

This morning Hadoop distro provider MapR and Teradata, the big data analytics and marketing applications company, announced that they have expanded their partnership. What it comes down to, in the simplest possible terms, is that the companies will work together to integrate and co-develop their joint products and to create a unified go to market strategy,

Teradata will also be able to resell MapR software, professional services, and provide customer support.

In other words, Teradata will be the face of MapR to enterprises who use, or want to use, both technologies.

The Market Likes Hortonworks' IPO Filing

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In one sense the timing of Hortonworks IPO filing couldn’t have been better. It came on Monday, just a week after Forrester analyst Mike Gualtieri said that Hadoop in the enterprise was no longer optional.

“The jury is in. Hadoop has been found not guilty of being an over-hyped open source platform. Hadoop has proven real enterprise value in any number of use cases including data lakes, traditional and advanced analytics,” he wrote in his Forrester blog.

He went on to say that the dazed and confused CIOs who haven’t had Hadoop on their agendas thus far will get with the program in 2015.

So if you’re one of the three independent commercial vendors providing software and support for the open source big data muncher, it’s highly likely that your business is going to take off. Especially because there’s not an analyst, or even a competitor, we can find who thinks Hadoop is a winner-takes-all-market.

And it’s a big market.

Is the Hadoop Market Ready to Go? Hortonworks Filed its IPO

OK Cloudera, you say the world’s only commercial pure Open Source Hadoop distro provider, Hortonworks, doesn’t have a sustainable business model?

Well, let’s see Wall St. thinks.

Today, the company unveiled news that it confidentially filed its S-1 with the US Securities and Exchange Commission in August under the auspices of the JOBS Act. Form S-1 is used by companies planning on going public to register their securities with the SEC.

While many think that IPO’s are about founders cashing in on their blood sweat and tears, you can bet that Hortonworks is raising money for one specific reason — namely, to get the capital it needs to become the world’s predominant enterprise Hadoop provider.

If Hadoop Disappears, Will the Label on Your Distro Matter?

2014-24-October-Elephant-Family.jpgIn the next year we’ll see Hadoop disappear, so said Cloudera co-founder and chief strategy officer Mike Olson in his keynote at the O’Reilly Strata + Hadoop World conference last week.

Olson has a way of saying things that cause a reaction. Last year it was his introduction of the Enterprise Data Hub that took everyone off guard, and this year it’s the promise that the big data muncher named after an elephant in a storybook will practically vanish from the line of sight of all but a few geeks.

You’d think that if it were invisible and it was all open source then the brand of Hadoop used might not matter so much.

Cloudera + Microsoft's Snuggle in the Cloud Causes Confusion

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Anyone that Hortonworks gets into bed with, Cloudera snuggles up to next.

This, of course, is not a proven theorem. But it sure seems to be the case lately.

Earlier this month Hadoop enterprise data hub provider Cloudera announced a deeper integration with long time Hortonworks partner Teradata. Hortonworks’ 100 percent open source Hadoop distribution (HDP) powers many of Teradata’s big data offerings, including the Teradata Appliance for Hadoop.

Yesterday, at a Microsoft press event, Mike Olson, Cloudera’s Chief Strategy Officer, shared the stage with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella and corporate vice president Scott Guthrie to announce his company’s intention to become Microsoft Azure Certified.

Faking Big Data #strataconf

Sorry folks, but this shouldn’t come as too big of a surprise. Anytime a new technology or field emerges, so does a group of posers. They’re typically software vendors, consulting firms and “experts” who claim to be able to help you cross the chasm between where you are and where you need to go to remain viable in the future.

These aren’t, for the most part, evil companies, snake oil salesman or under educated individuals. Vendors iterate products as quickly as they can and push them out too early, they take shortcuts and rationalize them and sometimes they simply don’t know that they don’t know what they’re doing.

Big data is still an emerging field.

Cloudera + Teradata = Big Data Love?

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Hadoop may make many promises, but Teradata delivers solutions that enterprises trust.

We’re not saying this to ruffle any feathers because it isn’t an either or game. Every now and then we see headlines that say things like “Cloudera Declares End Of Data Warehousing Era” or see pictures of tombstones with RDBMS written on them, but the reality is that a good many of Teradata’s  users ignore  them or figure that Teradata will deliver big data capabilities, in a palatable doses, when the time is right.

And that’s essentially what Teradata and Hadoop pioneer Cloudera are banging the drums about this morning as they announce an expanded partnership around technology integration, sales and support. In other words, the two companies will work together to integrate Teradata’s integrated data warehouse and Cloudera’s enterprise data hub so that customers can work with multiple data sources (Cloudera’s Enterprise Data Hub being one of them) through the Teradata Unified Data Architecture (TDA).

This means that not only will Teradata customers be able to “buy” Cloudera’s products and services from Teradata, but that they’ll be tuned to work together and mutually supported.

Does Cloudera Need to Cool It?

2014-22-September-Elephant-Fight.jpgA staple gun or roll of masking tape might come in handy today when Amr Awadallah walks in through his company’s doors. The CTO and co-founder of Hadoop platform provider Cloudera mouthed off about the competition to the European press late last week inspiring tweets like “Elephant fight!” The elephant reference, for anyone who may not know, refers to the symbol used for Apache Open Source Hadoop.

Are Hortonworks + Hive Community Paving Hadoop's Future?

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Marry a big vision and a vibrant open source community and you’ll get something pretty special. In this case we’re talking about delivery on the Stinger initiative, which teamed engineers from Hadoop distro provider Hortonworks with more than 140 developers to advance interactive SQL querying ability on Apache Hive at scale in pure open source.

The initiative, which was completed in April, brought together over 390,000 lines of code contributed by developers from 44 companies, to provide business analysts and data workers with one powerful engine for SQL queries on big data sets at speed and at petabyte scale.

It does something that other big data solutions like it do not do: it gives users a single, simple tool to use for either interactive or batch processing.

Pivotal, Hortonworks and a New Hadoop Management Standard?

Gartner analyst Merv Adrian wrote an interesting blog post earlier this year titled “Hadoop is in the Eye of the Beholder.” In it, he posed an interesting question. What is Hadoop?

We’re not going to rehash his argument.  It’s a fine and even funny post. You should read it. But if you don’t, suffice it to say that he concluded that it’s not a question that’s easily answered. As a result, if you’re an enterprise that is “doing Hadoop,” “buying Hadoop,” or “shopping for Hadoop,” what exactly are you talking about?

It's Not Just the Money, Honey: HP and Hortonworks' $50M Marriage

2014-25-July-Just-Married.jpgHortonworks announced yesterday that it has won a $50 million investment from HP.

But it wasn’t billed that way by either company. Instead the press release read “HP and Hortonworks Deepen Relationship focused on Enterprise Hadoop.”

The reason it was framed that way is pretty simple: HP needs a powerful data engine for HAVEn, its “open” big data architecture that incorporates Hadoop, Autonomy, Vertica, Enterprise security and a number of apps that can be built on the platform. As part of the relationship, Vertica will soon be certified by Hortonworks as YARN-ready. YARN is a key component of Apache Hadoop 2.

Hortonworks, for its part, wants to spread and wed its flavor of completely Open Source Hadoop as widely and as deeply as possible, and being closely integrated into HP’s popular analytics stack, as well as some of its other offerings, is a good way to do that.

But that’s not all.

Will MapR Be the First Hadoop Vendor to IPO?

2014-30-June-Wall-Street-Bull.jpgGoogle Capital doesn’t invest in that many companies, in fact, before today there were only six.

And when do they invest, they’re hardly silent partners.

“We have the capability to use our money, our time, our effort, our expertise, our brain power, and the Google brand to help build great companies,” said David Drummond, chairman of Google Capital. Drummond is also Google’s senior vice president, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer.

While that statement doesn’t tell us much about how quickly Google Capital expects to realize a return on its investments, the particular partner they assign to a startup may be telling.

This morning Gene Frantz, a general partner at Google Ventures, who specializes in late stage startups, takes a seat on MapR’s board.

MapR, for anyone who doesn’t already know, is a San Jose, Calif.-based enterprise software company that develops and sells Apache Hadoop-derived software.

Open Source Search Goes Commercial

In early June the open source search business arguably came of age when Elasticsearch closed on a $70M tranche of Series C investment funding. Elasticsearch is supported by both an open source search community and a commercial search business. In November 2012 the company received $10M in a Series A investment funding which was followed by a further $24M in a Series B funding in February 2013 -- making the total of investment funding now $104M.

Series C funding is usually seen as a substantial level of endorsement of the future of the company by the venture capital investment community. The next level, Series D, is seen as a prelude either to an Initial Public Offering or a trade sale.

Hadoop's Holy Moment #hadoopsummit

Thumbnail image for 2014-5-June-hadoop's-holy-moment.jpg.jpgLook, I’ll be the first to admit that the so-called “Hadoop Wars” can be kind of interesting. Who isn’t going to click on a link that says something like “The Hadoop Wars: Cloudera and Hortonworks' Death Match.”

Or read beyond this first sentence:

“Another day, another set of choice words hurled at one Hadoop vendor by another. This time, it’s Hortonworks doing the hurling, claiming that Cloudera’s business model isn’t designed for today’s big data market.”

But sometimes, when we get so busy consuming this kind of content, we fail to remember the other story -- how Hadoop came to be and why, as a technology, it’s been able to evolve so quickly and become one of the major catalysts ushering in computing’s third age.

Teradata's Data Lake has the Ease of a Beach #HadoopSummit

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Teradata users love Teradata.

It’s a relationship that’s rarely found in the world of enterprise technology. And quite frankly, until you talk to enough of Teradata’s customers, it’s hard to believe it exists.

But last year at Teradata’s Partners user conference we witnessed it — not by talking to users the company had hand-picked for us to meet, but from conversations with the guys or gals who stood in front or behind us as we waited in lines for our morning joe, on the many long walks from the hotel to the conference center and at lunch, when we sat to chow-down with strangers. The folks we spoke to, almost without exception, professed their love for Teradata.

And we’re telling you this because it matters. A lot.

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