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Information Management News & Analysis

Week in Review: No More BYOD + Egnyte Ups EFSS Stakes

Ready for the CX battle?
One awful customer experience taught us lessons.

Mark Cuban: Wired for Competition
CMSWire's Bill Sobel sat down with the legendary NBA owner.

Forget BYOD, HP Says
HP doesn't want your personal devices at work.

Terminate the Status Meeting
It's time for more productive gatherings in the workplace. 

Stealing Box's Thunder?
Can Egnyte light an EFSS fire? 

US Crackdown on Cybersecurity
Security experts analyze President's State of the Union. 

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Turn Weaknesses of the Cloud into Strengths

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It wasn't long ago that CIOs balked at storing data in the cloud, citing the risks of data breaches, regulatory violations, higher costs or other show-stoppers.

Over time that view has changed, but perhaps less than you'd think.

In an instant poll of the audience members at yesterday's CMSWire webinar on Enterprise Content Management (ECM) strategies, 73 percent of the participants said their companies limit or prohibit cloud-based document storage. Only 26 percent said they store high-value or high-risk documents in the cloud.

Blame People for Cloud Downtime Woes

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People are among the top concerns for public clouds. They make mistakes. And those mistakes lead to downtimes.

The findings come from CloudEndure's first survey of IT professionals in North America and Europe, "2014 State of Public Cloud Disaster Recovery."

Specifically, the 116 IT pros ranked human error is right up there with application bugs and network failures as the primary risks to system availability.

MegaChat Is No Skype Killer, But It's Not MegaUpload Either

Controversial entrepreneur Kim Dotcom, the guy behind the now-shuttered MegaUpload, is at it again. He's got a new product, MegaChat, and a new boast: he claims MegaChat, an end-to-end encrypted voice and video chat service his company launched in beta yesterday, is a “Skype killer."

It’s unlikely Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella will see it that way — and frankly we don't either. But MegaChat is targeted at people who are wary of Skype’s security, so it may have a future.

Dotcom claims MegaChat offer users completely private video and voice calling with text and video conferencing slated to follow. And it proves something else, Dotcom tweeted:

Will 'Cloud-Only' Cast a Shadow on the Box IPO?

Box CEO and co-founder Aaron Levie is obsessed with the cloud. He wears cloud socks, the license plate of his car said “Go Cloud” and he tweets about “cloud” constantly.

Back in 2010, he asked if it was a “problem to judge girls you meet by how much they know about cloud computing?”

In 2011 he predicted that “for everyone in cloud and the enterprise, this is going to be a very big year for us all.” We guess you could say Box had an exciting year: it landed Proctor and Gamble as a customer.

In 2012 Levie reported “I'm just struggling with a world where #Tebow is more exciting to the general population than cloud computing.”

In 2013 he suggested that a book about cloud storage would be a blockbuster: ”There's a Facebook book. And now a Twitter book. Shocked that no one wants to write about the cloud storage industry. #bestseller”

In 2014 he told the world that a win for Box (after gaining 300,000 employee GE as a customer) is a win for “cloud, user-centric IT, enterprise mobility and more. There is a real sea change in software adoption happening.”

So far this year he’s had to put a muzzle on it (and we’ve missed his stream of jesting tweets) as he waits for its company to go public, which should happen tomorrow. It's expected to open at $14 a share.

Office 365 Extends Email Security to Address Spammers, Phishers

Microsoft is tightening up the security of its email offerings on Office 365 through the extension of features.

The goal here is to provide a “safer client experience” that will authenticate senders and help identify untrusted senders, helping to protect your system from spam and phishing campaigns, the tech giant explained.

While Office 365 is already pretty secure, Microsoft maintains the only way to beat hackers and other Internet nuisances is to keep one step ahead.

Dropbox's CloudOn Buy Isn't its Only News

Oh, please, that’s what we thought late last night when Dropbox pinged us to say that the CloudOn acquisition wasn’t its only news for the day. Mathew Jaffe, who oversees Microsoft-related projects for Dropbox, announced that Dropbox apps are now available for Windows phones and tablets.

While this might not have been all that newsworthy earlier in the week, based on the market’s reaction to Microsoft’s announcements today, it may suddenly matter a lot. Why? Because there’s suddenly a real chance that Windows 10 might become omnipresent in our lives. 

A Simple RACI Chart for File Share Clean Up

As you check off the tasks in the work breakdown structure of the file share clean-up project, certain persons within the organization will be quite vocal. One way to clarify the roles and their responsibilities is via the mechanism of a simple RACI chart. Remember: simple is elegant.

Dropbox Just Got Stickier in the Enterprise

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How does it feel to wake up a few days before your company’s IPO to discover your rival just made a smart acquisition? We don’t know, and Box co-founder and CEO Aaron Levie can’t tell us: He's in a quiet period mandated by the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), which prohibits him from making such comments.

But here’s the deal. Early this morning Dropbox announced that it now owns CloudOn, a top 10 workplace productivity app in 120 countries. CloudOn makes it easy for people to edit, create, organize and share docs on any platform.

This should yield big wins for Dropbox (and its 300 million users) for several reasons. First because CloudOn brings with it an attractive mobile UI for content creation and collaboration as well as the team of engineers who built it. And second because the 100,000 companies who use Dropbox for Business will be able to do more of their work in Dropbox without ever having to leave the platform. The win for the enterprise? Productivity.

Office 365 Gains Text Analytics With Equivio Buy

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Microsoft has bought text analytics provider Equivio — an acquisition that should both add another piece to the Office 365 puzzle and give Microsoft considerable traction in document-heavy enterprises like legal or financial firms.

While neither company would confirm the sales price, there is speculation the deal closed for about $200 million. If that's correct, Microsoft snapped up some pretty impressive text analytics for a relatively reasonable sum. In fact, the technology could end as a premium layer to Office 365 once Microsoft starts pulling it into its wider portfolio.

Q1 Planning: Top Marketing Technology, Social Business Conferences & Events (21-Jan-15)

Our industry event planner gives you the heads-up on what key industry events are coming around the corner. If we've missed something, don't hesitate to add your event to the list. (You can also view the full calendar here.)

You're Invited: Security and Compliance in the Cloud

Join CMSWire and M-Files with Doculabs tomorrow for a one-hour webinar to better protect your information in the cloud and ensure compliance.

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M-Files Eases Hybrid Cloud Computing With Metadata

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The only things everyone seems to agree about when it comes to hybrid cloud computing is that it’s going to be around for a long time to come — and many vendors have many ways of approaching it. For M-Files, the unique selling point is a system that can manage all your content without repositories.

That sounds like a big claim … and maybe it is. However, M-Files has been developing this for years, first in Europe and now in the US, and the proof of its claims are clear in its continued and staggering growth rates.

Discussion Point: Security Experts Respond to the State of the Union Address

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Cybersecurity wasn't even the stuff of dreams when George Washington delivered the first State of the Union message to Congress on Jan. 8, 1790. But fast forward to 2015 and there it was, playing a prominent role in Barack Obama's annual address to the nation.

Obama called for better cybersecurity in his televised address last night, urging Congress to pass legislation that will improve computer protection. “No foreign nation, no hacker, should be able to shut down our networks, steal our trade secrets or invade the privacy of American families, especially our kids,” he said.

Leave Your iPad at Home, Forget BYOD, Says HP

Face it, HP notes: iPads, Android and Windows tablets may be great but they weren’t built specifically for business. And the house that Meg Whitman rules may have a valid argument when you consider that the devices are being used by gazillions of kids strapped into shopping carts drawing animals for Night Zookeeper, by teens playing Candy Crush Saga and by moms who have adopted them as digital recipe displays when they cook. Never mind everyone watching Netflix.

Think about it. Do you want to make sales presentations on the device that your kid rests his lollipop on? Or that you and your honey used last night to watch a racy movie? Maybe yes, maybe no, but that’s not the main reason HP thinks that you might want to use different devices at work and at home.

“They (consumer-grade devices) also pose significant challenges to IT departments who have to support their now mobile workforces while keeping corporate data managed and secure,” said Ron Coughlin, senior vice president and general manager, Personal Systems, HP.

Making EFSS More Than Just a Bucket for Content

2015-20-January-Jeetu-Patel-2.jpgOver the holidays I had the opportunity to trade some emails with Jeetu Patel on the future of the Enterprise File Sync and Share (EFSS) industry. Patel is general manager of Syncplicity, a business unit of EMC.

Prior to leading Syncplicity, Patel was Chief Strategy Officer of EMC's Information Intelligence Group (IIG). He was responsible for orchestrating and driving cross-category product vision, growth strategy, innovation agenda, cloud computing and big data initiatives. Additionally, he headed Worldwide Marketing for IIG, where he was responsible for product marketing, thought leadership, as well as competitive, vertical and solutions marketing.

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