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Open Data News & Analysis

Free the Web From Google, Cage the IT Gorillas #OWF14

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PARIS — The final note for today from Paris and the Open World Forum (OWF): Let’s de-Google the Internet. If that didn’t catch your attention, then this will: It can be done.

It’s almost a given that at any gathering of open source workers there’s going to be a lot of shouting about taking the web back, and putting Microsoft, Google, IBM, Apple and all the other IT gorillas back in their cages.

From previous experience, this usually takes place after about the fifth glass of wine, beer or whatever your particular poison happens to be (OK, after the second glass, if you don’t do it often).

OWF is no different, except the call to free the web from Google came during one of the sessions this afternoon. Pierre-Yves Gosset of Framasoft, a non-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of free, libre and open source software and culture, pointed out that not only should the web be freed of control by the big companies, but that it should also be decentralized.

In the City of Love, Microsoft Courts Open Source #OWF14

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PARIS — Let’s face it. One of the things you don’t expect at an open source party is Microsoft. However, Microsoft is here at the Paris Open World Forum (OWF) and outlined its position on open source through the offices of Frederic Aatz, Director of Interoperability Strategy at Microsoft.

What does that title mean in English? You could describe him as the guy that gets things to work together — which was reflected in his message: Microsoft and open source need to get along.

Open Source, the US and French Pastries #OWF14

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The seventh Paris Open World Forum (OWF) opened today in … well, where you might expect — Paris. And this year it’s all about reclaiming data. Not just about the data you use to carry out everyday business tasks, but about the kind of data that gets lost when IT companies close down the source.

Interestingly, even the password for access to the Wi-Fi system here underscores the drive of this conference, which is, according to Florent Zara, OWF president, is about demonstrating how enterprises and users can regain control of their data.

The Dollars and Sense of Sentiment

Sentiment Analysis Symposium

You don’t have to be an expert to understand that what people feel is as important as what they think — and more important than what they say they think. The reality is that emotions, opinions and attitudes are universal, continual and potentially beneficial for organizations with the technology and solutions to understand them.

Just this week, feelings came to the forefront at the Sentiment Analysis Symposium in New York City. The two-day event began Wednesday with a half-day of workshops on technical and business topics and continued Thursday with a full agenda of speakers.

I bet you're already wondering: "What was the sentiment around the Sentiment Analysis Symposium?" And I plan to answer that question. But let's start at the beginning.

OpenText Jumps on Open Data Bandwagon #ODD2014

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OpenText is not in the habit of giving away money. Neither is the Canadian government. However, in recent weeks, each has given $3 million to the newly formed Open Data Institute in Canada.

But open data is not a Canadian initiative, it is a global movement that is creeping into businesses everywhere — and the focus of an International Open Data Day tomorrow.

What Do You Know About the $1B Global Text Analytics Market?

SethGrimes201201.jpgIf you're reading CMSWire, you're either a text analytics user or you should be. So that means you can help with a study I'm conducting.

Text analytics involves extracting business value from written words – from texts, tweets and blogs to things like customer contact center notes and corporate document archives.

Data Insights Generate Big Wins for Kids via Donors Choose and Looker

pencilandsharpener.jpgSometimes the difference between a kid who can write a story and a kid who cannot is a pencil that’s sharp enough to write. And believe it or not, there are classrooms that don’t have pencils or pencil sharpeners.

There are first graders who haven’t read "A Cat in the Hat" because their classroom doesn’t have a copy of the book.

And there are fourth graders who are supposed to be learning about science, but their teacher is unable to access microscopes, lab notebooks or even geodes. 

Spreadsheets, Datapaloozas and the 'Liberation' of US Government Data

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A hashtag reporting the location of downed power lines. Medication error reports from the US Food and Drug Administration available through APIs. A crowdsourcing tool to geotagged photos of disaster areas to help first responders. These varied technologies are part of a major open data initiative underway at White House — and they're being propelled by a series of data-fests called Datapaloozas.

What's a Datapalooza? Think of a party that attracts a curious blend of data geeks, entrepreneurs, industry hotshots, politicians and bureaucrats. They come together in the hope of turning vast amounts of government data into apps and computer programs that anyone or any business can use.

Open Data is Worth $3 Trillion, New McKinsey Report Claims

Thumbnail image for OpenDataMcKinsey.pngYou don't have to sell Michael Chui on the importance of big data. He knows the amount of data worldwide is exploding, that use of big data is becoming a key basis of competition and growth -- and that we're on the cusp of a critical shortage of data scientists.

Chui is one of the authors of what is arguably the most quoted source of information on big data, a 2011 report from McKinsey & Co. And now he's pushing the envelope on our understanding of a data-driven world with a new report that focuses on the economic potential of open data. "The open and liquid use of data is becoming more and more prevalent," Chui said. And that's a good thing.

Do 1 billion Users Mean the Open Web is Dead?

After one week in the Apple App Store, Facebook has blocked a Yandex app called Wonder from accessing user data in the social search app's quest to help friends find what each other are doing, listening to and reading. Open web...yea right.

Open Data Institute Revs Up Data.gov.uk to Leverage Startups, Open Governments

Could the key to better government lie in its mountains of already free and available data

Open Data Standard for the Web Takes a Step Forward

If you have ever thought, “If I was defining standards, I would have never done it that way.” Here is your chance. Open standards organization the Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS) announced it is accepting participants for its newly created technical committee, the OASIS Open Data Protocol (OData) Technical Committee. The committee will be responsible for developing the first OASIS version of the OData standard.

'Open Government' Initiatives Give Developers Access to Government Data

They're from the government and they're here to help you. No, really. Some of the biggest collectors of data are the various governments, whether on a national, state and regional or local level. Increasingly, governments are making this data available to developers, who are using it to produce applications.

Who Owns Data Gathered by UK Universities?

Don't believe everything you read on the Internet. Fortunately, when I write a story, I'm a bit anal about going to read the source materials. So when I came across a Slashdot post by Sara Chan claiming that "scientists at universities, which are all public in the UK, can now not claim data from publicly-funded research as their private property," I hunted down the ruling in question and gave it a read.

Open World Forum 2010: Openness in the Land of Liberté

OpenWorldForum2010.jpgIf your company or project is heavily involved in the open scene (open source, open data, open government, etc) then one conference you may want to consider for 2010 is the Open World Forum (news, site). Not only do you get a chance to hobnob with people working and thinking hard on how to further drive openness on many levels, you get to do it in Paris.

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