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Records Management News & Analysis

Moving Your Information Governance to the Cloud

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In spite of frequent reports about the uptick in cloud adoption -- with a recent IDC report predicting an additional 11 percent shift of IT budget away from in-house IT delivery towards different cloud models by 2016 -- some businesses are still hesitating. To them, maintaining tight control of corporate information means keeping it on-premises.

However, moving data to the cloud does not have to equal loss of control over data, or a decrease in its security, governance and privacy.

So how do you navigate the pillars of cloud data governance?

Businesses Committed to SharePoint, Despite Stalled Deployments

Since Microsoft unveiled SharePoint back in 2001, it has been one of the fastest growing products in the software giant's history. Along with billions of dollars in revenue, the platform now boasts 125 million users and counting.

Businesses first deployed SharePoint as a point solution for document sharing amongst project teams and as a stand in to files-shares. SharePoint proved a capable solution for these challenges and Microsoft has continually added to its capabilities.

But despite its scope, and as with many types of software, it suffers from a perceived lack of user commitment.

We Need Fewer Information Managers and More Business People

I recently gave a keynote presentation at a records management conference in Salt Lake City on how records managers need to evolve to meet the demands of the changing landscape of corporate information management.

The talk covered a wide range of subjects: from techniques for getting buy in, to the differences between records management and information management, to information management's centrality to front office operations, and how “justifying your existence” is critical for information managers.

But the key theme was to stop being information managers and start being business people.

Cleaning Up File Shares: Keep, Move, Delete or Archive?

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Destruction of significant, unique objects from a file share is rarely the first step in the destruction phase of the life cycle of the record. Usually the process of elimination from deduplication to significant, unique object deletion is multi-faceted.

Here is one way your company might approach a few of the decisions.

Blame the C-Suite for Your Failed SharePoint Project

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About two out of three organizations complain their SharePoint projects have stalled (26 percent) or failed to live up to their expectations (37 percent).

And it gets worse, according to new AIIM research.

A majority of respondents blame those SharePoint failures on lack of support from senior management.

A Simple RACI Chart for File Share Clean Up

As you check off the tasks in the work breakdown structure of the file share clean-up project, certain persons within the organization will be quite vocal. One way to clarify the roles and their responsibilities is via the mechanism of a simple RACI chart. Remember: simple is elegant.

CMSWire's Top 20 Hits of 2014: SharePoint

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You've all heard of Ground Hog Day, right? Well, how about Ground Hog Year? Looking back at the SharePoint landscape over the past 12 months, that’s certainly what it looks like.

In 2013, the conversation was dominated by 1) SharePoint Online 2) SharePoint and Yammer and 3) SharePoint in Office 365. In 2014, the conversation was dominated by … well, you guessed it: 1) SharePoint Online 2) SharePoint and Yammer and 3) SharePoint in Office 365.

CMSWire's Top 10 Hits of 2014: Information Management

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The problem about information management is that, in reality, there is little management around most enterprise’s information. New technologies enter the market, old ones are upgraded and the mass of information that is contained in enterprise silos just keeps getting bigger.

Leaving aside the big data space in 2014, which we look at elsewhere, there were a number of initiatives over the year that caught the attention of a lot of people, even if the information management space is just as chaotic as it was at the beginning of the year.

You Don't Need New Toys to Succeed at ECM

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Victory!

We finally did it.

My wife and I have been threatening to throw away, donate or sell the majority of our kids' toys for years. If you are a parent you know the drill. You've accumulated a massive horde of cheap plastic dolls and plush animals with enormous cartoon eyes. Every birthday, Christmas and (let's be honest) trip to the grocery store adds to the collection. Then after what seems like mere hours that toy joins the others in the trash heap you generously refer to as a "play room."

We all know this is the pattern and still most of us fail to correct it or clean up the junk. I'm happy to say that as of Sunday evening 80 percent of the toys in my house have been sorted for disposition, to borrow an industry term. And with the holidays around the corner my wife and I are having conversations about how to handle this gift giving season without falling back into our bad habits.

Cleaning Up File Shares: Bloody Footprints and Zombie Projects

2014-30-October-Zombie-Response.jpgFile share projects don’t culminate in casual review of file extensions. The fun is just beginning. The next steps should include “easy deletes,” baseline statistical capture and thoughtful project management.

Cleaning Up a Large File Share

File shares will not exist forever. Microsoft will eventually stop supporting them. It is important that IT departments begin reviewing the objects from the “bottom up” (file to folder to sub directory to directory) yesterday. Information management professionals know best how to apply a set of internal (user-driven) and external (records retention schedule) criteria to determine what objects stay where they are, what objects move to other locations or custodians, and what objects are deleted.

CIO be wary: this is not a four month project.

Quick Start Guide to Archiving Documents in the Cloud

2014-27-August-Squirrel.jpgIf you're considering whether your organization should go with cloud-based archiving for some of your documents, take a two step approach in your decision making. First, understand what your archiving requirements are -- whether on premises or in the cloud. Then clarify what the pros and cons are of on premises versus cloud based archiving and decide which approach makes sense for your organization right now.

Taking the First Steps Toward ECM in the Cloud

2014-20-August-Climbing.jpgIt was only two or three years ago that clients would ask about storing their content in the cloud in purely theoretical terms. There was no interest in actually doing anything about it, but it was a sexy conversation to have.

Now the conversation is no longer about "if clients could move their content to the cloud" but "when will they move content to the cloud." And if our clients are really honest, the conversation is about how they get control over all of the content they currently have in the cloud regardless of if the platform is official or not.

By 2020 every enterprise organization will be running cloud content management for a portion of their application needs. So the question becomes, where do you start? How do you begin building a strategy when we don't know exactly what things will look like when we get to the end?

One Consultant's Approach to a Small SharePoint Cleanup

A pilot SharePoint cleanup project is straightforward. A consultant facilitating a small project to clean up a company’s SharePoint intranet can reach the lessons learned phase with a few basic tools.

Recall the mantra: simple is elegant.

Microsoft Moves to Win Cloud, EFSS and Other Markets

Storing, synching, editing and/or sharing files in the cloud has suddenly become big business. Startups like Box, Dropbox, and Syncplicity (now owned by EMC) sensed this long ago because their founders rightly predicted that the knowledge workers of the future wouldn’t want to be emailing files to themselves and keeping track of various versions any more than they did. Ditto for carrying thumb drives around.

Fast forward a few years and the market cap for enterprise file sync and share (EFSS) services may be as big as a trillion dollars. It’s no wonder giants like Citrix, EMC, Google and Microsoft all want part (or all) of that action. Winning is critical to their ability to gain, or even retain, Enterprise market share.

As we’ve written before, Microsoft isn’t sitting back and watching as Google and Amazon race to the bottom on the price of cost storage. And while part of the reason they are doing this is to sell the Azure platform, the other part is retaining Microsoft Office, Office 365 and SharePoint market share. After all, as Enterprises map their cloud strategies, they’ll likely look at all of their options versus simply lobbing what they have on the ground to the sky.

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