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Security News & Analysis

10 Years in Cyberspace Security

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Ten years ago, I wrote a paper on the future of cyberspace. In it, I pointed to three areas that we needed to address to make cyberspace safe for information sharing: establishing strong cyber-trust, enabling secure mobility and striking a balance between security and privacy rights.

So much has changed since then. Or has it?

Kofax Focuses on Customer Communication with $19.5M Buy

Kofax, an Irvine, Calif.-based financial technology company, just spent $19.5 million to acquire Aia, a customer communications management vendor based in The Netherlands. 

Kofax will integrate Aia’s software into its TotalAgility platform. It will also continue to offer the product on a standalone basis. 

Kofax claims the acquisition will strengthen its platform and give it a competitive edge.

SQL Injection and Little Bobby Tables: How to Protect Your CMS

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If your eyes glazed over at the recent announcement of an “SQL injection” vulnerability in WordPress, take heart. You’re not alone.

SQL injection attacks are a common kind of security flaw, but are subtle enough that it’s hard for regular folks to understand what’s at risk.

In this article we’ll walk you through the basics: what “SQL injection” means, what risk it presents to you, and what you can do about it.

Location, Location: Your Risk of Fraud Is Tied to Your Address

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A new data point is emerging about online fraud and cyber risk that is giving the business community pause. Apparently location matters when it comes to victimization.

Two security companies — Forter in Israel and EnigmaSoftware in the US — have found certain cities and states have higher numbers of fraud perpetuated on their residents. Forter also found certain states tend to have a higher number of residents that actually commit this fraud.

Week in Review: SharePoint Woes + The Future of SEO

SEO's Future Examined
And guess what? It's not SEO.

Why Lenovo Should Anger You
Superfish guts your computer’s security.

Six Key Facts about Windows 10
What you should say in the boardroom.

Road Ahead for Digital Experience
CMSWire Tweet Jam: CX Analyzed.

Hey, C-Suite, It's Your Fault
Blame them for SharePoint failures.

Are Remote Workers Sane?
Productive? Yes. Sane? Questionable.

Lean Content Marketing E-Book 
How to create content on a budget

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Can the Internet of Things Help You Connect to Higher Profits?

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Businesses that  embrace the Internet of Things (IoT) will be up to 10 percent more profitable by 2025, according to a new study from Verizon (registration required).

Before you rush to make new connections, consider the obvious. Verizon has a vested interest in promoting the IoT. In 2014, the company saw a 45 percent year-over-year revenue growth in its own IoT business — which translated to about $585 million of its $88 billion in revenue in 2014.

Still, the research is interesting.

Verizon, using proprietary data and results of commissioned studies from ABI Research, estimates there were 1.2 billion different devices connected to the Internet last year and that the number will rise to 5.4 billion by 2020 for an annual growth rate of 28 percent.

So how can you tap in to boost your bottom line?

Why You Should Be Worried (and Angry) About Lenovo

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By now, the entire tech world has heard all about the egg on Lenovo’s face. The incident — Superfish’s catastrophic security screw-up — was all over the news last week: "New Lenovo PCs shipped with factory-installed adware," said Engadget. "Lenovo poisoned its own PCs with Superfish adware," from CNET. "Lenovo caught preloading 'Superfish' adware on laptops," according to TechSpot.

The coverage has been extensive, detailed and informative. There’s one big problem with it, though: it’s all wrong.

Superfish is far, far worse than anything those articles might have led you to believe. It’s more accurate to say that it’s a near-total gutting of your machine’s network security. Security analyst Marc Rogers described Superfish as “quite possibly the single worst thing I have seen a manufacturer do to its customer base.” Here’s why.

Do Enterprises Need a Secure Texting App?

Texting apps like WhatsApp, SnapChat and Viber are all the rage in the consumer space. But what about texting apps for the enterprise?

With more companies embracing bring your own device (BYOD), it's logical to assume there's a need for a secure enterprise texting solution. As Shaun Smith, technology practice director at Xceed Group, noted, that BYOD has its benefits — as long as companies conduct due diligence and weigh those benefits against the possible risks.

Enter ArmorText, a Reston, Va.-based company that's developing a secure messaging client for the enterprise, targeted specifically at those in regulated markets. The company has already raised nearly $2 million in outside funding.

ArmorText is positioning itself as the answer to BYOD security concerns: It claims its products and services will make BYOD the rule in the workplace rather than the exception.

Week in Review: Get Better at SharePoint + ECM, WCM Partnership

EMC, Meet Hippo
WCM and ECM providers form a partnership.

Back to Basics for Web CMS
It's time to cut through the chaos.

Community Management Analyzed
Managers still suffering from lack of money.

Collaboration Trends
The pulse of today's collaboration tools.

Big Data for All
Geeks and non-geeks: Microsoft wants you. 

Increase SharePoint Productivity
Simple steps to raise SharePoint productivity.

Selling the Story: The Content and Commerce Combination 
A look at trends sweeping over the commerce landscape

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Can Lenovo Regain Consumer Trust After Secretly Installing Adware?

Sometimes it's not enough to say you're sorry. Take Lenovo. The $40-billion-a-year Beijing, China-based tech company admitted it was wrong to pre-install third-party adware on some of its consumer notebooks last fall.

But it's not off the hook yet. Users and industry analysts claim the company betrayed its consumers by using a "virulent, evil adware" called Superfish Visual Discovery to attack secure connections, access sensitive data and inject advertising. 

"Lenovo sold out their customers for some extra cash," said Marc Rogers, a 20-year tech security industry veteran, principal security researcher at San Francisco-based CloudFare and security blogger. "In doing that, it completely crippled one of the key security controls that customers rely on when using the Internet -- SSL."

Don't Open Your Email: Agari Warns Malicious Messages Have Soared

It's hard to quiet the voice of Paul McCartney when you read through Agari's latest study on The State of Email Trust. All you have to do is read the introductory paragraph of the report, which the security solutions provider released today:

Email security improved somewhat in 2014, but most companies still haven’t implemented technology that prevents cyber criminals from sending messages that appear to come from their domains — a failure that leaves customers vulnerable to phishing attacks." 

Think about that for just a moment — and odds are you, too, can visualize McCartney's words:

Someone's knockin' at the door
Somebody's ringin' the bell
Do me a favor,
Open the door and let 'em in." 

Businesses are unwittingly opening the door to cybercriminals who trick people into sharing sensitive information, leading to identity theft and other crimes. 

What's more, because victims of phishing attacks often blame the companies they thought sent the forged emails, the attacks erode the trust companies spend years building with customers.

Amazon Muscles Deeper into the Enterprise Space

Amazon Web Services has introduced several upgrades aimed at moving it deeper into the enterprise space.

Its identity and access management (IAM) upgrades, for instance, make it easier for enterprise users and, specifically, systems administrators, to manage and change identities and security settings.

Jeff Barr, Chief Evangelist for Amazon Web Services, explained In a blog post that the upgrade enhances longstanding IAM features, which until now been associated with single users and the identities they governed.

Microsoft Adds 4 Security Measures to Office 365

Microsoft has added four security measures to Office 365 to help businesses keep their data secure. Two of the measures are focused on compliance and the other two offer better identity protection.

Are four new measures at once a bit much? Not if you consider things like the recent Anthem breach.

Microsoft’s drive to ensure Office 365 security and compliance is nothing new. But with the number of high profile information breaches growing, everyone responsible for enterprise data is a bit edgy.

Are E-Signatures the Missing Links in Paperless Offices?

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The paperless office is still a dream.

While there are plenty of possible reasons, the most likely involve a combination of technology and management — and, some claim, the failure of even organizations with enterprise content management (ECM) in place to adopt an e-signature strategy.

The problem is not a lack of available e-signature solutions, but the failure of C-Suite executives, including Chief Information Officers, to deploy or develop IT strategies that include digital signatures because of security and legal concerns.

6 Reasons Hackers Love the Internet of Things

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Haven't jumped on the Internet of Things (IoT) because of security concerns? New research from HP Fortify shows there's reason for caution.

HP Fortify researchers reviewed ten IoT-connected home security systems and found all of them are vulnerable to account harvesting via the cloud connection or interface.

But that’s not all. They also found all systems could work with weak security passwords, all of them were lacking an account lock-out mechanism, 90 percent didn’t have a two-factor authentication option and 70 percent had problems with systems updates.

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