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The Hidden Dangers of Customer Requests

Customer Experience, The Hidden Dangers of Customer RequestsWhy listening to customers can sometimes be a bad thing

“We listen to our customers” is a claim we hear from product makers frequently. It’s supposed to assure us that the company has in mind the best interests of its users. But what if listening to customers is actually the last thing a company should be doing?

Take your kids for example. Are you a parent who does what your children ask? Do you feed them what they want when they want it, and then fix them something else if they decide that what you’ve provided is less than ideal? Do you fear that if you don’t do what your kids ask that they’ll find other parents?

Persons in positions of authority are expected to lead, not follow. They are expected to know what’s right, even if it’s not popular, and they are expected to stay ahead of the pack. They are expected to provide answers for questions that haven’t even been asked.

So why then are so many companies listening to their customers?

Faster Horses Would Have Sold Well Too

“If I had asked customers what they wanted, they would have said a faster horse” is a quote Steve Jobs once attributed to Henry Ford when justifying Apple’s way of doing things. There’s doubt about whether Ford was the correct source, but there’s no doubting the quote’s meaning: customers don’t always know what they want.

To be clear, customers always know what they like. Show people the Motorola Razr in 2005 and they would have told you they like it. Ask what they wanted next and they likely would have described some variation of the Razr — perhaps lighter, faster or in different colors.

Then, of course, came the iPhone, which made discussions about new Razr-like devices far less interesting. What do you think Motorola, Nokia and Research In Motion were doing while Apple was designing the iPhone? And what was Western Union doing while PayPal was on the drawing boards?

Business history is full of examples of companies that have listened to customers instead of reinventing themselves to better serve customers.

Customer Requests Are a Lagging Indicator

The problem with customer requests is that they come too late. All the “should haves” that customers voice across social media are as useful for improving product development as a sportscaster’s calls are for improving a game.

By the time customers comment on what’s been released, it’s too late. Most customer requests come not from vision but from having seen a feature in another product. The other guy has it, so they want it too. Customer requests like these say little more to a company than, "You’ve missed the boat and you’ve fallen behind."

When a company finally does decide to give customers what they want, new releases are typically met with “it’s about time” more than any appreciation. And, as marketing people know, “it’s about time” features don’t read well in press releases.

B2B Customers Are Too Self Focused

The other danger of business-to-business (B2B) customer requests is that they are typically about improving things for that customer but not all customers. Some vendors are prone to honoring such requests, especially when they come from the highest bidder or the squeakiest wheel. But this just leads to feature bloat that makes products cumbersome.

Software vendors in particular often forget that we built APIs specifically for the purpose of extending the product to meet nonstandard needs. When a product management team is doing the work of a services team, something is wrong.

Someone Has to Be the Daddy

Recall your interactions with really creative and talented people — designers, writers, technical visionaries. Chances are you’ve found that with just a little direction these people are able to take the lead and produce results. Rare is the creative genius who asks for step-by-step guidance.

As the developer of a product, it’s up to you to be that creative genius.

Your customers don’t want to have to tell you what you should be doing any more than you want to have to offer pixel-by-pixel coaching to an illustrator. Customers pay you for your leadership. Don’t think that asking customers what they want is showing respect for their wishes. In fact, asking customers what they want is showing them that they’ve picked the wrong brand.

Ideally, customers should be at least three years behind your vision. If they are not, then you have a vision problem.

Stay Ahead of the Airplane

There’s a saying in Aviation that a good pilot stays ahead of the airplane. It means that no matter what happens in flight, the pilot is never caught off guard.

 

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