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SharePoint Will (Almost) Never Be Your Sole ECM System

This topic has to some degree been a theme in many of my posts over the last 18 months, but given how often I'm asked to speak to this in my day-to-day travels — and given the amount of churn it causes among us pundits and prognosticators on both sides of the fence — I figured I'd address it head on here in a single post.

In a Nutshell

The short answer for why SharePoint will almost never be your sole enterprise content management (ECM) system is that, simply put, the vast majority of organizations have ECM needs that go beyond what SharePoint on its own can deliver. Full stop.

I know this is going to inspire a lively debate, so let me try to frame that debate ahead of time by explaining in more detail just what I mean.

SharePoint's ECM Shortcomings by Industry

First let's consider some of the more advanced ECM needs that go beyond what SharePoint can do grouped by industry:

  • Financial Services, Banking, Insurance: high-volume transactional workflow, e.g., account opening, claims processing, billing, underwriting, etc., high-volume scanning and indexing
  • Energy and Natural Resources: engineering drawing management, construction project management, supply chain management, asset management
  • Manufacturing: engineering drawing management, supply chain management, asset management
  • Construction: engineering drawing management, construction project management, supply chain management, asset management
  • Pharma: clinical trial management, regulatory submission, quality and manufacturing
  • Government: DOD compliant records management, high-volume scanning and indexing

SharePoint's ECM Shortcomings in General

Second, beyond these industry-specific cases where SharePoint on its own doesn't cut it, consider the following advanced ECM needs that cross all industries:

  • ERP archiving: storing, managing, and making accessible the documents associated with ERP-enabled processes, e.g. , procure to pay, order to cash, etc.
  • Employee Lifecycle Management: storing, managing, and making accessible the documents associated with the employee lifecycle, e.g., job descriptions, hiring materials, onboarding documents, performance review data, separation documents, etc.
  • Customer Relationship Management: storing, managing, and making accessible the documents associated with the customer lifecycle, from the sales process through service, maintenance, and end of life
  • Contract Management: storing, managing, and making accessible the documents associated with the contract lifecycle, from the sales process through contract negotiation and execution, to contract administration, renewals and renegotiations, to contract completion/termination
  • Records Management: being able to systematically manage paper and electronic records throughout their lifecycle, from creation to disposition, in accordance with the corporate records retention schedule

SharePoint with Add-ons is not SharePoint on Its Own

I can hear the responses that are brewing out there now: Joe, you’re being intentionally provocative (again). SharePoint can do all of these things — there's an ecosystem of 1200 plus partners that have made a living (many of them a very healthy one at that) helping SharePoint do all these things and more. Just own up to the fact that SharePoint is a grown-up ECM system just like the big three already!

I don’t disagree with any of this. It's all true and I help many clients navigate the sometimes confusing waters of the SharePoint partner ecosystem to find solutions that deliver value for their employees. However, SharePoint with add-ons is not SharePoint on its own. It is SharePoint doing what it does best — i.e., solving for the bottom 40 percent of the ECM capabilities continuum — being used in conjunction with other solutions that solve for some portion of the remaining 60 percent. See Figure 1 for a visualization of what I mean.

Enterprise CMS, Information Management, SharePoint Will (Almost) Never Be Your Sole ECM System

Figure 1: ECM Capabilities Delivered by Platform Type

Understand Your Partner's Risk/Value Profile

For the sake of argument, let's pretend that SharePoint plus add-ons can be considered a single platform: i.e., SharePoint. Couldn't this "single platform" be an organization's sole ECM system? Wouldn't it be an attractive option, since almost everyone has SharePoint already and this option prevents them having to get in bed with the big ECM vendors, with all the headaches that that brings?

 

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