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Document Management Software News, Reviews

Office For Windows 10 Optimizes Mobile, Touchscreen

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During this week's Windows 10 reveal event, Microsoft gave a glimpse of the future. And yesterday Microsoft’s Julia White, general manager for Office Product Management, provided a few more details.

Here's what we know. In addition to the soon to be released Windows 10 Technical Preview, look for a touchscreen version of Office as well as Office for Windows 10, a suite of apps including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook and Calendar.

Blame People for Cloud Downtime Woes

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People are among the top concerns for public clouds. They make mistakes. And those mistakes lead to downtimes.

The findings come from CloudEndure's first survey of IT professionals in North America and Europe, "2014 State of Public Cloud Disaster Recovery."

Specifically, the 116 IT pros ranked human error is right up there with application bugs and network failures as the primary risks to system availability.

Will 'Cloud-Only' Cast a Shadow on the Box IPO?

Box CEO and co-founder Aaron Levie is obsessed with the cloud. He wears cloud socks, the license plate of his car said “Go Cloud” and he tweets about “cloud” constantly.

Back in 2010, he asked if it was a “problem to judge girls you meet by how much they know about cloud computing?”

In 2011 he predicted that “for everyone in cloud and the enterprise, this is going to be a very big year for us all.” We guess you could say Box had an exciting year: it landed Proctor and Gamble as a customer.

In 2012 Levie reported “I'm just struggling with a world where #Tebow is more exciting to the general population than cloud computing.”

In 2013 he suggested that a book about cloud storage would be a blockbuster: ”There's a Facebook book. And now a Twitter book. Shocked that no one wants to write about the cloud storage industry. #bestseller”

In 2014 he told the world that a win for Box (after gaining 300,000 employee GE as a customer) is a win for “cloud, user-centric IT, enterprise mobility and more. There is a real sea change in software adoption happening.”

So far this year he’s had to put a muzzle on it (and we’ve missed his stream of jesting tweets) as he waits for its company to go public, which should happen tomorrow. It's expected to open at $14 a share.

Dropbox's CloudOn Buy Isn't its Only News

Oh, please, that’s what we thought late last night when Dropbox pinged us to say that the CloudOn acquisition wasn’t its only news for the day. Mathew Jaffe, who oversees Microsoft-related projects for Dropbox, announced that Dropbox apps are now available for Windows phones and tablets.

While this might not have been all that newsworthy earlier in the week, based on the market’s reaction to Microsoft’s announcements today, it may suddenly matter a lot. Why? Because there’s suddenly a real chance that Windows 10 might become omnipresent in our lives. 

A Simple RACI Chart for File Share Clean Up

As you check off the tasks in the work breakdown structure of the file share clean-up project, certain persons within the organization will be quite vocal. One way to clarify the roles and their responsibilities is via the mechanism of a simple RACI chart. Remember: simple is elegant.

Dropbox Just Got Stickier in the Enterprise

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How does it feel to wake up a few days before your company’s IPO to discover your rival just made a smart acquisition? We don’t know, and Box co-founder and CEO Aaron Levie can’t tell us: He's in a quiet period mandated by the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), which prohibits him from making such comments.

But here’s the deal. Early this morning Dropbox announced that it now owns CloudOn, a top 10 workplace productivity app in 120 countries. CloudOn makes it easy for people to edit, create, organize and share docs on any platform.

This should yield big wins for Dropbox (and its 300 million users) for several reasons. First because CloudOn brings with it an attractive mobile UI for content creation and collaboration as well as the team of engineers who built it. And second because the 100,000 companies who use Dropbox for Business will be able to do more of their work in Dropbox without ever having to leave the platform. The win for the enterprise? Productivity.

Office 365 Gains Text Analytics With Equivio Buy

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Microsoft has bought text analytics provider Equivio — an acquisition that should both add another piece to the Office 365 puzzle and give Microsoft considerable traction in document-heavy enterprises like legal or financial firms.

While neither company would confirm the sales price, there is speculation the deal closed for about $200 million. If that's correct, Microsoft snapped up some pretty impressive text analytics for a relatively reasonable sum. In fact, the technology could end as a premium layer to Office 365 once Microsoft starts pulling it into its wider portfolio.

Making EFSS More Than Just a Bucket for Content

2015-20-January-Jeetu-Patel-2.jpgOver the holidays I had the opportunity to trade some emails with Jeetu Patel on the future of the Enterprise File Sync and Share (EFSS) industry. Patel is general manager of Syncplicity, a business unit of EMC.

Prior to leading Syncplicity, Patel was Chief Strategy Officer of EMC's Information Intelligence Group (IIG). He was responsible for orchestrating and driving cross-category product vision, growth strategy, innovation agenda, cloud computing and big data initiatives. Additionally, he headed Worldwide Marketing for IIG, where he was responsible for product marketing, thought leadership, as well as competitive, vertical and solutions marketing.

Can Egnyte Snuff Box's IPO Fire?

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Egnyte CEO Vineet Jain makes no apologies. He handpicked today to reveal that his company is raising the stakes in Enterprise Sync and Share (EFSS), just a few days before Box’s IPO. The latter is expected to start trading on the New York Stock Exchange at the end of the week -- on Jan. 23.

Jain said Egnyte initially planned to make its announcement on Jan. 27. But he didn’t want to chance Egnyte getting grouped in with Box should its IPO disappoint. “We don’t want to be defined by the way the market reacts to Box,” he said.

Of course Jain, whose company might be seen as a Box competitor (they are both named in the same Gartner MQ report as well as Forrester Wave), made it clear that though both companies provide solutions around file sharing, they are quite different.

“EFSS is table stakes,” he said. Box co-founder and CEO, Aaron Levie has said this too. Ditto for the CEO’s of a dozen other competing vendors.

Sigh: Email Isn't Going Anywhere

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Guess what? Email isn't going away. Guess what else? According to Pew Research, email is far more popular than social media and texting. The research also shows email is more important to office workers than the broader Internet itself.

The findings also show that email and the Internet are the most important communications and information tools. Among all online workers surveyed, 61 percent rated email as very important to their jobs and 54 percent said the same of the Internet.

As Merlin Mann, the San Francisco-based writer, speaker and broadcaster, has noted, "Email is such a funny thing."

8 Companies Leading ECM Into 2015

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The enterprise content management (ECM) market looks set to change again. According to new research form Boston-based Nucleus Research, enterprises are taking to the idea of storing content on external servers.

ECM vendors have moved into agile mode and are now focusing on the development and simplification of their systems as well as automation and integration of new capabilities to generate value propositions for customers.

Kofax Simplifies E-Signature Capture, Processing

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Kofax has kicked off the New Year with the launch of a family of e-signature products that the company claims will enable organizations of all sizes to improve digital transaction management.

The new products from the Irvine, Calif.-based financial technology company include Kofax SignDoc Standard and Kofax SignDoc Enterprise, as well as integration with the Kofax TotalAgility process automation suite. What’s more, Kofax boasts it is offering the new products at prices that will make them universally accessible and disrupt the status of a very competitive market.

Does Box's IPO Pricing Spell Trouble or Humility?

Understated is not a term anyone would use to describe Box co-founder and CEO Aaron Levie. The Silicon Valley whiz kid who does magic tricks on stage, speaks at every conference on the planet (we’re only slightly exaggerating) and is quoted on Twitter as if he were a seer of some sort had his company’s IPO priced today. The Enterprise File Sync and Share (EFSS) provider has officially begun its road show.

The company, which originally filed to raise as much as $250 million last March, today revealed that it expects to raise somewhere between $137.5 million to $162.5 million. It will offer as many as  12.5 million shares at $11 to $13 a share.

Microsoft Explains How It Will Fix OneDrive

If you’re using Microsoft OneDrive and thinking about moving to Dropbox so you can sync shared folders or sync selected files across your platforms, then you might want to hang on for a while. Microsoft announced in its roadmap for OneDrive that all users will have this functionality by the end of the year.

It has also promised both OneDrive, its consumer file sharing application, and OneDrive for Business will work off a single sync engine in an attempt to dispel the confusion over two products with the same name but different back ends and audiences.

Lexmark Believes ECM Is Good For Your Health

Lexmark moves slowly, but solidly. Its latest move is the acquisition of medical imaging technology provider Claron in an all cash deal worth $37 million.

Lexmark has also announced that once the deal is closed it will incorporate Claron’s medical content management technology into Perceptive, the enterprise content management vendor that Lexmark bought in 2010 for $280 million.

If this all appears to be a little marginal to the main ECM game plan, then think again.

New research by Dallas-based MarketsandMarkets has estimated that the medical document management systems market could be worth an estimated $425 million by 2019, up from $220 million this year. While that is a relatively small amount of money in the overall ECM scheme of things, there are few enough players in the market, making it a lucrative if specialized sweet spot.

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