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Document Management Software News, Reviews

Is Adobe Building A Productivity Cloud?

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It’s been a busy week in the document management space. Adobe let loose its Document Cloud, Accusoft and EMC teamed up on a release, and Microsoft shared some new releases and promises of things to come.

Shadow IT Isn't Going Away - and That's a Good Thing

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There's a new public enemy number one in the land of information management -- shadow IT.

The name alone sounds ominous, as if the “The Imperial March” from "Star Wars" should play in the background when you say it. It portends rogue employees, covert operations and malicious attempts to undermine the good work of corporate IT. The negative hype surrounding shadow IT has reached fever pitch -- which means that it's grossly overblown.

While shadow IT has its share of drawbacks, the overwhelmingly negative connotation attached to it is unwarranted, and the notion that organizations need to destroy it is false.

Shadow IT is not going away. Not now, not in the future. In fact, the formation of shadow IT groups will only grow larger as the data landscape and thirst for analytics continues to expand. More important than its staying power, however, is something no one wants to acknowledge: shadow IT is a good thing.  

Why You'll Stay Loyal to Dropbox and MS Office

Microsoft and Dropbox have one big thing in common. They both own their audiences where productivity tools are concerned.

Think about it. When you go to create a document, you think Word. To create a spreadsheet, you think Excel. To create a presentation, it’s PowerPoint.

But where will you save your creations if you want to share them or store them in the cloud? Most people think Dropbox rather than OneDrive.

Ex-Ektron Pres Tim McKinnon Now Sonian CEO

Tim McKinnon — the man who steered Ektron through its merger with EPiServer before leaving the company himself — started a new job this week. And he said he couldn't be more excited about the opportunity to take the helm of a small but growing company.

The former Ektron president is now president and CEO of Sonian, a Dedham, Mass-based provider of cloud-based archiving. Founded in 2007, the company helps businesses preserve, retrieve and "bring meaning to their vast expanse of data," McKinnon claims.

"It's a perfect fit," McKinnon told CMSWire today. "It matches what I like to do with what the company needs."

Egnyte Supercharges Google for Work

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Every time we build something we shake up the world.

Egnyte co-founder and CEO Vineet Jain was somewhat kidding when he said that. But he was half serious, too.

He and his team have been busy building out an Enterprise File Sync and Share (EFSS)-like offering that they’re labeling as “Adaptive Enterprise File Services."

No matter what you call it, it’s about providing businesses users with a secure, policy driven way to work and share content from anywhere, any time, on any device, regardless of where it is stored, whether in the cloud or on-premises.

“It’s intelligent file sharing,” said Jain.

Does Lexmark Have What it Takes to Be an 800 Pound Gorilla?

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Where does an 800 pound gorilla sit?

Anywhere it wants.

And in the case of Lexmark, it wants to sit in the enterprise software space.

Brian Anderson, Chief Technology Officer for enterprise software at Lexmark, told CMSWire that the combination of Lexmark's hardware business, plus the enterprise content management capabilities gained through its 2010 Perceptive buy, plus the business process management spoils from its recent Kofax acquisition will turn Lexmark into an 800 pound gorilla.

Dramatic Shifts Ahead in the ECM Market

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The very nature of content is changing. After years of convergence and consolidation, we're seeing a new way of thinking about enterprise content management (ECM) emerge -- what's possible and what it means for business.

The future of ECM is Deep Content. This new form of information-rich content is highly-structured and human-readable, yet also computer-ready. With deep content, metadata is often content, often very structured and nested, and sometimes carrying very large payloads. 

If you take a step back and look around, how many old paper-based or paper-inherited process do you see? They are everywhere in the corporate and government world.

The deep content approach offers tremendous value. It transforms documents into software in order to improve the way we work, create new lines of business and get a new level of insight, agility and actionability on business processes.

OpenText Advances Its Blue Carbon Strategy

OpenText's just released Service Pack 1 (SP1) is a stepping-stone to its upcoming Blue Carbon strategy, which features applications and analytics centered on cloud services.

Muhi Majzoub, senior VP of Engineering, said SP1 pulls together the remaining strands of OpenText’s Red Oxygen strategy and sets the stage for Blue Carbon, which goes into beta in December and will be generally available next March.

Moving Your Information Governance to the Cloud

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In spite of frequent reports about the uptick in cloud adoption -- with a recent IDC report predicting an additional 11 percent shift of IT budget away from in-house IT delivery towards different cloud models by 2016 -- some businesses are still hesitating. To them, maintaining tight control of corporate information means keeping it on-premises.

However, moving data to the cloud does not have to equal loss of control over data, or a decrease in its security, governance and privacy.

So how do you navigate the pillars of cloud data governance?

Todd Klindt: Cool Things I've Learned About Windows 10 Preview

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Man I talk a lot. But anyone who listens to my weekly podcasts already knows that.

For those of you who don't know me, I've been a professional computer nerd about 15 years. I've focused on SharePoint about the past eight.

My weekly SharePoint Podcasts air Mondays at 8:30 PM CT. They're brought to you by the folks at Rackspace.

You can find out about all the great SharePoint things we do at Rackspace, which happens to be my employer, by going to sharepoint.rackspace.com.

Anyway, I work from my home in Ames, Iowa, and I don't get a lot of adult interaction during the day. So I've made friends with some of the other tech nerds here in town. Once in a while, we go out and have lunch.

A month or so ago we're all having lunch and one of the guys starts talking about how I should get transcripts for my podcasts. And I'm like, "That's not valuable at all for anybody."

HP Sues to Recover $5.1B From Autonomy Deal

Hewlett-Packard Co. filed a suit in London’s High Court against Michael Lynch and a former colleague for about $5.1 billion for damages in connection with their management of Autonomy, the software company Lynch co-founded.

The suit, which HP filed yesterday but only confirmed today, also names Autonomy’s former Chief Financial Officer Sushovan Hussain. Both are accused of fraud in relation to the HP acquisition of Autonomy in 2011 for $ 10.1 billion.

Lynch and Hussain, in a statement issued through a PR agency, told Re/Code today they will countersue HP seeking at least $148 million in damages.

Businesses Committed to SharePoint, Despite Stalled Deployments

Since Microsoft unveiled SharePoint back in 2001, it has been one of the fastest growing products in the software giant's history. Along with billions of dollars in revenue, the platform now boasts 125 million users and counting.

Businesses first deployed SharePoint as a point solution for document sharing amongst project teams and as a stand in to files-shares. SharePoint proved a capable solution for these challenges and Microsoft has continually added to its capabilities.

But despite its scope, and as with many types of software, it suffers from a perceived lack of user commitment.

You Can't Create Digital Businesses Without E-Signatures

Two converging trends — the growth of the mobile workforce and digital business processes — are giving a big boost to the e-signature market.

That's the word from Michael Laurie, co-founder and VP of product strategy at Silanis, an electronic signature provider.

"Acceptance for e-signatures has been growing over the past years in terms of end user adoption," he said, noting that customer experience is a priority. If users don't like an e-signature solution, they won't use it, he said.

OpenText Takes Its Digital First Message to Paris #OTInnovate

OpenText has been beating the Digital First drum pretty loudly in North America. And this week it finally brought the message to France.

It didn't have any particular reason to beat the drum it in Paris, apart from it being a mighty fine city. It was just the latest stop on its Innovation Tour.

We Need Fewer Information Managers and More Business People

I recently gave a keynote presentation at a records management conference in Salt Lake City on how records managers need to evolve to meet the demands of the changing landscape of corporate information management.

The talk covered a wide range of subjects: from techniques for getting buy in, to the differences between records management and information management, to information management's centrality to front office operations, and how “justifying your existence” is critical for information managers.

But the key theme was to stop being information managers and start being business people.

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