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Document Management, Document Management Software

Where Document Management Went Wrong

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Ask anyone who works in an organization and they'll tell you: managing business information well is a struggle. This is true for structured data (like customer, product or transaction information in enterprise systems), but even more so for unstructured data, e.g., the innumerable documents to be found piling up everywhere in an organization. And no matter what new technological advances get introduced or governance frameworks get published or industry group gets created, managing documents well appears to be getting harder and harder and we seem to be getting worse and worse at it.

Dropbox's CloudOn Buy Isn't its Only News

Oh, please, that’s what we thought late last night when Dropbox pinged us to say that the CloudOn acquisition wasn’t its only news for the day. Mathew Jaffe, who oversees Microsoft-related projects for Dropbox, announced that Dropbox apps are now available for Windows phones and tablets.

While this might not have been all that newsworthy earlier in the week, based on the market’s reaction to Microsoft’s announcements today, it may suddenly matter a lot. Why? Because there’s suddenly a real chance that Windows 10 might become omnipresent in our lives. 

A Simple RACI Chart for File Share Clean Up

As you check off the tasks in the work breakdown structure of the file share clean-up project, certain persons within the organization will be quite vocal. One way to clarify the roles and their responsibilities is via the mechanism of a simple RACI chart. Remember: simple is elegant.

Dropbox Just Got Stickier in the Enterprise

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How does it feel to wake up a few days before your company’s IPO to discover your rival just made a smart acquisition? We don’t know, and Box co-founder and CEO Aaron Levie can’t tell us: He's in a quiet period mandated by the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), which prohibits him from making such comments.

But here’s the deal. Early this morning Dropbox announced that it now owns CloudOn, a top 10 workplace productivity app in 120 countries. CloudOn makes it easy for people to edit, create, organize and share docs on any platform.

This should yield big wins for Dropbox (and its 300 million users) for several reasons. First because CloudOn brings with it an attractive mobile UI for content creation and collaboration as well as the team of engineers who built it. And second because the 100,000 companies who use Dropbox for Business will be able to do more of their work in Dropbox without ever having to leave the platform. The win for the enterprise? Productivity.

Office 365 Gains Text Analytics With Equivio Buy

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Microsoft has bought text analytics provider Equivio — an acquisition that should both add another piece to the Office 365 puzzle and give Microsoft considerable traction in document-heavy enterprises like legal or financial firms.

While neither company would confirm the sales price, there is speculation the deal closed for about $200 million. If that's correct, Microsoft snapped up some pretty impressive text analytics for a relatively reasonable sum. In fact, the technology could end as a premium layer to Office 365 once Microsoft starts pulling it into its wider portfolio.

M-Files Eases Hybrid Cloud Computing With Metadata

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The only things everyone seems to agree about when it comes to hybrid cloud computing is that it’s going to be around for a long time to come — and many vendors have many ways of approaching it. For M-Files, the unique selling point is a system that can manage all your content without repositories.

That sounds like a big claim … and maybe it is. However, M-Files has been developing this for years, first in Europe and now in the US, and the proof of its claims are clear in its continued and staggering growth rates.

8 Companies Leading ECM Into 2015

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The enterprise content management (ECM) market looks set to change again. According to new research form Boston-based Nucleus Research, enterprises are taking to the idea of storing content on external servers.

ECM vendors have moved into agile mode and are now focusing on the development and simplification of their systems as well as automation and integration of new capabilities to generate value propositions for customers.

Kofax Simplifies E-Signature Capture, Processing

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Kofax has kicked off the New Year with the launch of a family of e-signature products that the company claims will enable organizations of all sizes to improve digital transaction management.

The new products from the Irvine, Calif.-based financial technology company include Kofax SignDoc Standard and Kofax SignDoc Enterprise, as well as integration with the Kofax TotalAgility process automation suite. What’s more, Kofax boasts it is offering the new products at prices that will make them universally accessible and disrupt the status of a very competitive market.

Microsoft Explains How It Will Fix OneDrive

If you’re using Microsoft OneDrive and thinking about moving to Dropbox so you can sync shared folders or sync selected files across your platforms, then you might want to hang on for a while. Microsoft announced in its roadmap for OneDrive that all users will have this functionality by the end of the year.

It has also promised both OneDrive, its consumer file sharing application, and OneDrive for Business will work off a single sync engine in an attempt to dispel the confusion over two products with the same name but different back ends and audiences.

Lexmark Believes ECM Is Good For Your Health

Lexmark moves slowly, but solidly. Its latest move is the acquisition of medical imaging technology provider Claron in an all cash deal worth $37 million.

Lexmark has also announced that once the deal is closed it will incorporate Claron’s medical content management technology into Perceptive, the enterprise content management vendor that Lexmark bought in 2010 for $280 million.

If this all appears to be a little marginal to the main ECM game plan, then think again.

New research by Dallas-based MarketsandMarkets has estimated that the medical document management systems market could be worth an estimated $425 million by 2019, up from $220 million this year. While that is a relatively small amount of money in the overall ECM scheme of things, there are few enough players in the market, making it a lucrative if specialized sweet spot.

Get Your Hands Dirty with Microsoft's New Office App

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Microsoft Office is about as sexy as _____. You fill in the blank. And you’ll probably have to strain your brain to think of something that’s dull enough. “Cardboard” comes to mind.

If there’s any good news around that, it’s that Microsoft gets it, and they seem to be thinking rather carefully about what to do about it.

Making big changes to Word or Excel could be disruptive, and in a bad way, because if we were asked to work with something radically different, we’d be likely to check-out non-Microsoft options too.

But what about PowerPoint? Do our presentations provide the same exceptional, modern experiences as tools like Prezi do? Are they as easy and enjoyable to use? Can we create and consume them equally as effectively on PC’s, tablets, phones?

Huddle Gets $51M to Prove Its Value is Collaboration, Not Files

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Huddle founders Andy McLoughlin and Alastair Mitchell have something that Box CEO Aaron Levie badly wants. And it’s not the $51 million in new funding they announced yesterday, a car with a steering wheel on the right side or even a British accent.

It’s having his company recognized as an Enterprise Content Collaboration platform provider or, in other words, a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) solution that goes beyond file sharing and not only gets the right information to the right people but also gives them the tools they need to achieve their goals, all in one place.

Levie didn’t tell us this, of course.  But Box, in its S-1, which was updated this week, calls itself an “a cloud-based, mobile-optimized Enterprise Content Collaboration platform that enables organizations of all sizes to easily and securely manage their content and collaborate internally and externally”. Ask the modern worker what Box is, and if they’re familiar with it, they’ll tell you it’s the Dropbox for business, which may be a whole other problem.

Dropbox + Office = Sticky

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Hey CIO — you know your employees are using Dropbox at work. And, yes, they know you don’t want them to, and that there are other tools available and all of that … but here’s the deal: they just want Dropbox. Anything else is like getting hot fudge covered chix stix when you want chicken fingers …interesting, maybe, but every day, no thanks.

Microsoft Soups Up Office Online with Contextual Search

2014-11-December-Tall-Bicycle.jpgNo one likes dumb anything, least of all technology companies. In a move to smarten-up Hangouts, Google added "smart" suggestions yesterday. Microsoft is on the case as well, making its Office Online app a lot smarter with the addition of contextualized Bing search into documents.

If that sounds complicated, it’s not. The new feature, called Insights for Office, lets users search for information from an inline search box inside a document. The answers include information scraped from Bing Snapshot, Bing Image Search and Wikipedia, among others.

3 Takes on the Future of Document Management

When you're choosing document management software (DMS) you have to look to the future. Whichever platform you select will impact the way you do business for the next five to 10 years at least — so don't  be shortsighted when making your decision.

Enterprise content resides on all web environments and so integrations between DMSs and Web CMSs are becoming crucial. So the importance of “future-proofing” document management was top of mind for me when I attended Amplexor’s Future of Document Management event in Belgium last week. Amplexor designs, builds and runs DMS projects for enterprises. With over a decade of experience in the Enterprise Content Management field, it knows who the visionaries in the field are. On Nov. 20 it got them all in one room.

Trending Features In Document Management

The paperless office is still to a large extent a dream. But the possibility of developing paperless processes is a very real opportunity, according to this year’s AIIM annual industry watch research.

The findings are contained in AIIM’s Paper Wars: An Update From The Battlefield. AIIM — the Association for Information and Image Management — is a global community of information professionals. The research is the result of a global survey of 336 AIIM members between September and October of this year.

According to Doug Miles, report author and director of market intelligence, paper documents are still clogging offices and stalling business processes even though office workers are mobile, computer literate and aware that paper-free processes improve productivity and lower costs. But the news isn't all bad.

The Paperless Office? Dream On

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The paperless office is only a dream, and we should be setting our sights a little bit lower.

That's how Doug Miles introduces this year’s AIIM Industry Watch report on document management, specifically on paper-free processes.

Even though office workers are mobile, computer literate and aware that paper-free processes improve productivity and lower costs, most organizations are still struggling against the tide of paper documents that clog offices and stall business processes.

AIIM — the Association for Information and Image Management — is a global community of information professionals.

Nitro: From Down Under to Over $15M

Document productivity company Nitro, originally founded in Melbourne, Australia, will beef up its San Francisco headquarters after raising $15M from Bay Area venture capitalists (VCs) in a bid to go after the big fish of document management, including Adobe and Citrix.

Nitro's products, including Nitro Pro and Nitro Cloud, enable document sharing in the enterprise. This includes the ability to sign and share documents and exchange them on mobile devices.

Cleaning Up File Shares: Bloody Footprints and Zombie Projects

2014-30-October-Zombie-Response.jpgFile share projects don’t culminate in casual review of file extensions. The fun is just beginning. The next steps should include “easy deletes,” baseline statistical capture and thoughtful project management.

With Acquisition, Citrix Aims for Lead in EFSS Market Race

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The Enterprise File Synchronization and Sharing (EFSS) market race doesn't expect to make its final lap any time soon.

And Citrix is confident it's taken a lead with its latest acquisition.

The Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based software giant announced yesterday it acquired RightSignature, the professional electronic document signing platform that marries Citrix's file storage, sync and sharing capabilities for businesses.

This isn't a new partnership but a solidifying of an existing one.

"We’ve been working together for the past year and have seen how our customers have benefited from, and happily embraced, the combination of easy e-signature and secure file sharing," Citrix's vice president and general manager of Documents Cloud, Jesse Lipson, said in a blog post. "It’s also a smart relationship: This acquisition supports our goal of helping our customers work better by improving critical document workflows."

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