Day Software, CQ5, CQ 5.2, DAM, Social Collaboration

Riding the CQ 5 and CRX momentum waves, Day Software (site, news) just released CQ 5.2 featuring new Social Collaboration (SoCo) and Digital Asset Management (DAM) applications.

While marrying web content management with social media, web 2.0 and DAM is hardly revolutionary -- nowadays, it’s more about execution than the idea itself.

Social Collaboration Blooming in CQ 5.2

Today’s enterprise customers may want Social Collab, but don’t necessarily know how to do it and how to manage a myriad of home-grown and third-party web 2.0 apps from all over the place. What Day did is interweaved Social Collaboration into their CQ5 WCM for easier management of all the fun activities like social profiling, blogs, wikis, calendaring, comments and rating, feeds, etc.

The integration comes with workflow integration that allows for moderation and permissions settings -- something many organizations may find very appealing.

Blogging and Wikis

While we do not agree with Day’s statement that “personal blogging is dead,” corporate blogging does hold some value. By wanting to address all the needs of enterprise bloggers, Day proposes WCM integration with workflow, SPAM and XSS protection capabilities. However, a blogger doesn’t actually need to interface with CQ5 WCM.

Enterprise wiki is where things are starting to get interesting. Day claims this is the first 100% JCR-based enterprise wiki. It runs on same platform as CQ5 WCM and can be integrated with your LDAP, while providing support WYSIWYG editing and wiki syntax. Using OSGi modules, you can extend the wiki to your heart’s content.

Calendaring, Feeds and Social Profiles

The new social calendaring tool is pretty standard by today’s standards. Personal, group and website calendars can be shared and integrated
through iCal (subscribe) and export (ICS and RSS feeds).

CQ5.2 also offers iGoogle integration with OpenSocial Container that can host your most beloved Google gadgets. Creation of additional OpenSocial gadgets is supported through CQ5’s RESTful API.

Social profiles are implemented with complete profile life cycle management in mind, allowing users to manage registration, moderation, permissions, etc. from the WCM system, as profile pages are actual CQ5 WCM pages and can be customized as any other content page.

Stencil API allows for bulk user profile management acting as a structure placeholder for all profile pages that can be filled with user-specific, actual data.

RSS & Atom feeds are handled with Feed API. Using the two default servlets -- *.entry.xml and *.feed.xml -- CQ 5.2 users can generate RSS entries and feeds. Podcasts’ generation can be accomplished automatically for nt:files.

The SoCo offering is topped with a built-in XSS Protection Library for all your Social Collab components and JSPs.

Reverse Replication Architecture

In what Day calls Reverse Replication architecture, content can be created in the author node, published and then accepted from Publisher for reviews. Alternatively, content can be created at Publisher as well, allowing to catch user-generated content and apply workflow and moderation to it. 

 

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CQ 5.2 Reverse Replication Architecture

 

DAM Fine DAM

Many WCM/ECM vendors attempt DAM, not many do it well. Day, actually, may be one of the exemplary few. The updated Day’s CQ 5.2 DAM is now web-based and integrated with the WCM bit.

It comes in two flavors: DAM Light and DAM Heavy.

Using the DAM Admin, admins can navigate the explorer-like view to do their job. If customizations are needed, let’s switch to WebDAV and CIFS that allows for customization, managing digital assets as files and folders, and a RESTful API for mashups creation.

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CQ 5.2 DAM Interface

DAM Finder is yet another interface that provides CQ5 template and components for use by end users, visitors and editors in a Google/Flickr-inspired view. Customizable, workflow-possible this view can be used for ingestion, extraction, rendering and publishing of assets.

Features like transcoding, resizing and cropping are included; as well as support for WebDAV and Windows Network bulk upload of digital assets.

Ah, SharePoint! Not providing a SharePoint connector is bad taste these days. With CQ 5.2, you can use the DAM Finder view to connect to third-party repositories like MOSS (where we know you store a bunch of digital assets).

Taxonomy and folksonomy administration works across DAM, WCM and Social Collab apps.

Most importantly, when it comes to DAM, let’s not forget about metadata. Day seems to do a good job in this field. Quick metadata editing and controls are possible and cover the following metadata encoding standards:

  • Dublin Core
  • IPTC
  • ID3
  • EXIF
  • XMP

What demos best is Day’s CQ 5.2 Lenses API. This feature allows you to create different views of your digital assets. Any collection of content -- search results, folder contents, lightboxes and single images – can be presented in different layouts (lenses), and users can switch between them on the fly.

Gallery, List and Detail views are provided out of the box. Feeling adventurous? Create your own views with JSPs.

Multi-Site Management With More Perks

The new Day CQ5.2 multi-site management tool is called Blueprint. The name rings a bell, doesn’t it?

It’s a wizard-driven site creation module that allows for inheritance of content from one site to another, including a set of roll-out rules, original version of site, live copy of the Blueprint, template and site structure.

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CQ 5.2 Site Creation

Other perks include synchronization, rollback, personalization and recommendation capabilities, and web 2.0 prebuilt widgets.

REST, JCR and JSP are the usual suspects on the backend.

Multilingual Content Management

Multilingual content management, as well as analytics and reporting tools are also part of the new and improved CQ5 (with drag & drop, of course, included).

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CQ 5.2 Multilingual Content Management

One of the useful features is the ability to trigger selective translation. We must note that there’s no translation memory system integration out of the box, though. However, we were told it is possible to create ways (using web services or the RESTful API) to export content from the CMS to external formats. Then, ship it to translation agencies and then import it back in a MS Word doc format, say, to update the CQ5 content repository.

So far, seven languages are supported in CQ 5.2 GUI out of the box. The semi-automatic translation can be workflow-supported and provides customers with an ability to start the initial, rough machine translation. Side-by-side view will show you all the changes from original to target language.

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Side-by-Side Translation Comparison in CQ 5.2

While this tool can certainly minimize the initial translation efforts, it’s not the answer to your globalization strategy. Human translation is the step no one has yet figured out how to skip.

All in All, It Was a Good Day

All in all, Day did fairly well with CQ 5.2. Next time there are questions about negative numbers on the balance sheet, the answer will (still) be simple: R&D and associated product launch costs (including time per day spent on Twitter with marketing efforts).

Check out http://www.day.com, and maybe you will luck out with an evaluation CQ 5.2 license.